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Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 3, Episode 35 · 1 year ago

Ep. 58 - Build-A-World

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week on Triple Advantage, we look at the difference between soft and hard worldbuilding in a campaign, complain about the inclusion of portcullises in the Dungeon Master's Guide, and discuss your hot D&D takes.

Welcome to episode fifty eight of triple advantage. On this episode we discuss hard versus soft world building and how that influences our stories. Then we dive into more dungeon topics, like what how? What is kind of like a door that needs its own explanation. Well, let's find out in this segment of divining the DMG. And lastly, we discuss why digital dice are exactly the same as real dice and this week's DND unpopular opinion. As a part of talk of the town, make sure you follow our social medias. That's where we post everything and we'll keep you up to date and, as always, enjoy the show. Welcome, members of the society, to yet another episode of Breeden. Remind me, this is episode fifty seven. That is entirely possible, Carlos. We are in the S. I have no concept of weeks anymore, so I stopped counting. We have been doing this for over a year now, though, so it is true. We didn't even do when your anniversary episode. No one did not. I'm times has lost all concept to anybody anymore, so I don't think there's a point. All right, maybe we'll do something specially for two year. It's episode of Fifty Eight. I was just looking at triple advantagude. Fifty seven was the last one we posted. Huh, I think it gets no, we'd definitely been doing this for longer too, because technically we've released down a section we start. Yeah, and we started this pretty covid so it's yeah, it happens for you. It was either January February, I think, that we started. I remember we tried to do like a right after, you know, New Year's thing. It was like a new content creation thing. I don't know, we thought it was cool to start around New Year's. I'll either way. There we are now, too long and I quite Oh, wow, well, there's a sound, but right there. You heard it first year, guys. Well, that's probably the most exciting thing that's happened on this show. It's up there. Well, let's get lower. That all right. Well, also, hid, we didn't say your name at the beginning and I feel like we've left you out somehow. But quickly moving on from that, today's echoes. I've been reading online about hard and soft world building. Now, to those listeners out there that I might already know what this is, well, I might entirely get this wrong and I'm going to summarize it extremely quickly, so don't expect much. But to those of you who haven't heard of what these methods of world building are, essentially the concept of like hard world building being a very well thought out and developed setting, where a soft world building is more adaptable, in the sense that maybe improvisation might take into place and the setting builds as your characters progress through it. And when I was reading it, it reminded me of what almost look at in this kind of game space and DD and whatnot. A very soft world building is almost like your procedurally generated game, right, a very true form of that, in both like performance and just like game, the game itself, whereas like herd world building is, you know, you have like your board, right, like the DM has, like this giant chess board of elements that can affect the party and the world, and lots of examples from were provided in the the many articles that are right about it. But in general, you kind of do you guys kind of understand what I'm talking about here? If you had heard or haven't heard about the subject, I had not heard before. You explain this to us and I think I'd. Yeah, I'm generally we are on what's going on. Yeah, I'm the same as Braden there where, you know, it kind of makes sense to me. I'm getting the VIBE that, like if we're talking Dand here, like I would say like explorers guide to wild mount is like a more I don't know whether it be a soft setting or like a hard setting, because it's hard in the fact that like there's, you know, all the towns are laid out, there's a bunch of like people, like important people, that are set up already for you in the world. There's like the Pantheon, like anything you can think of, essentially that you might need need made. But then like, obviously you can add on stuff, like in each town even...

...comes with like here's some a few suggestions on different quests that you can run in this town, but it's not like you know those are always happening or are always going to happen, whereas like a campaign module would be like well, the this is the quest, here's you know what is going to happen, or at least like a major portion of it. But I feel like in the campaign modules they don't set up the setting as much they're like yeah, no, this takes place in the forgotten realm setting, which means, like, you know, it's got this city, the city and this city in it. But, and that's all you really need to know the rest of the setting. You know, who cares kind of thing? You can make it up as you go right, yeah, and I think it does highlight the sort of ambiguity, that sort of national between like DM's in like tabletop games anyways, right, like you can, for example, run a Lord of the rings, seemed want, like adventure, and if you tie that directly into the world, right, that you could argue that, because you're doing that, it's a hard, you know, like some sort of like hard world building. Right, the world's already there for you. But if you're only really taking elements from the story as well, right, like even then I would say that that's still hard world building in the sense that we already have laur on the forgotten realms, right, like there is like that sort of extra stuff, maybe not to the depth of like Tolkien, right where, you know, you get into like custom languages and whatnot, and like there's always going to be a deeper pool, right, like in this in this kind of creativeness, like there's always going to be the person who's putting the more, more work into crafting at all. Right, but, like in general, I'm thinking of elements like when you get a DD module, you're taking your players through it, but realistically, everything that they can possibly experience is written in the module in the sense of like the areas that they can travel to, the characters that they'll be interacting with, the locations that they'll reach, all of that is going to be constrained by this story and because of that, I would actually say that that's more of like a hard world building element. But it's interesting that you mentioned the wild mount though, at least that's my opinion. I don't know it like anything. This isn't like like anything in DND, like just the topics that we've discussed. It's all art, it's all subjective. Right, they're there. They're definitely your clearer examples of it, right. But yeah, like I would say that in comparison, right, like a constrained game is almost that like hard set mode, whereas like a soft world building sort of experience would be more like, okay, I don't really have a location where the players are going to go to next and the players say, I want to get on this dragon and fly north. Well, now we got to build that. Now, we got to get to that and, you know, tie it into the story that they were just previously in. Right. So, yeah, with that in mind, though, I was actually going to say if you guys kind of understand these two topics now, if if you look personally how, if you know one hundred percent was hard world building and zero percent was soft world building, where would you guys kind of place yourselves in this scale? HMM, probably down towards the zero percent weight. Hang on, so you'd more like complete soft world building. Every every action that players takes more iterative and more improvised and you kind of develop the world as you go along. Oh No, sorry, the opposite. Okay, I've gone the wrong way with that. Close, close up to a hundred percent. I Jordan can at test because he's in my campaign and that I'm about to start. I put together, I built the world in its entirety and I put together a primer, but like here's what you would risk realistically know about the world and I gave it to all my players and then, on top of that, I have a ton of other notes for myself about stuff that they wouldn't necessarily know but that they can encounter in the world. So I have a list of all the locations and all the factions and for each location I have a list of all the relevant information and possible plot threads they can find at that place. So I I'm pretty good at this point at improving on the spot. My last campaign, unfortunately, fat a way of making me adapt to that, because no matter how much I wrote, they always found a way to make it not work out the way that I wrote. But for this one, like now that I've wrote, I've written, as suppose, everything out and it's there for me, I can kind of sit back and go, oh, okay, you want to do that? Let me...

...check my note. Yep, that's in there. Here you go, here's the information on that. So I've kind of front loaded all the work so that in the moment I don't have to work as hard. I can just kind of rely on what I've already got. Yeah, I feel like I've just been given an Easter icure because I will be in that campaign and it is called the endless ocean, which is now apparently he's not the entirety of it. MMM, not so endless, is it braided? Yeah, I guess I'll have to find out, but I'd sounds like it's pretty finite. Well, it sounds like if you sail too far you might just fall off the flat planet. So be careful. Yeah, think about the what's IT Gout? The Library of Babble, that one. It's like the Internet library where it's just constantly writing itself. HMM, yes, I see, it'd be unless you got never have perhaps yet another east F egg, but I'm on board with Braden there too. I definitely prefer the hard book world building, just because I like to be prepared and I don't like to have to, you know, think of things like on the spot, especially things that can be written out ahead of time. So I don't want to have to think of a city name or a tavern name or a shopkeeper's name, you know, in the moment I want to be like, okay, well, in this place there is such and such a person, such and such a place that you can go and stay at, and you know you don't you can do whatever you want in this place, and if I need to make up stuff, then I will and I'll have like pregenerated names and things like that, that I can just be like, okay, here's my list and I will use that. But for the most part, if I can have it ahead of time, then I want that, like because the players are are going to do something different than you anticipate. For the story part, if the world is set up already, then it's a lot easier to adapt to what they're doing. Yeah, totally, and I think it does definitely makes sense, especially when you're when you're trying to and it goes actually hand in hand with the amount of detail that you put into a hard world game. You you would normally want to give more exposition to these elements because you know them all right, and it can provide a greater depth of understanding of the world to the players, which is really cool, and I think that that's something that definitely would increase your engagement in the game itself. To write. So on the other avenue that I'm trying to think of where soft world building is beneficial in dnd and I, and the only thing that I can think of is like wild stories, wild and crazy tales that kind of just snowball out of proportion. Right, are you the DM that likes to say, Oh, we ride the dragon and cool, all of a sudden the dragon is your ally right, right, and I'm like it gives it gets very excited because it given it. It makes me feel like it's a little bit more of like a like a kid's tale, kid brain kind of approach, like just always adding, always very like I don't know if you ever done any like Improv but it's like yes, and and just kind of like go, yeah, so I haven't actually like I I think we're now the point that we're kind of delivering a better and more consistent experience. As DM's right, I can definitely say that since the beginning I've wanted to work up to like hard world building, to understanding everything about the game. And now that I'm reading this and I'm thinking like Oh shit, like those kinds of stories would be kind of fun on the like the just let's roll with it. It's taking me a second to kind of break away from like how much do I need to develop of a world to run an effective like kind of like soft campaign, like let's go where you guys. You know what kind of key locations do develop and what kind of the differences in how you would like design the game itself. I guess you're not really designing the world at that point. You're kind of just like designing how you how your players kind of move across this ever expanding board. which is funny because you mentioned that you were running wild mountain, right, yes, and how you said that that was more of a softer approach, but it's it's I was leaning towards hard actually with with wild mountain terms of Oh, you were everything. Yeah, everything is already set there. It's like a got the cities, you got the people, you got, you know, even quests that you could potentially use there. In terms of like campaign, like they've got a few...

...beginner stuff, story stuff that you can you can throw in there, but it's not like after that, like after level three, it's like yeah, go do whatever you want in this world. All the stuff is there for you. You can just, you know, go and do stuff. So storytelling, why is? It's very soft. But yeah, the the hard like world, the world is set for you. I'd say it's a softer approach. Like if you if you like, a good way to use that might be if you were going into like limbo or the abyss or the astral sea or something like that that is like infinite. Yeah, maybe, and that would actually be an interesting miix right, having different, completely different feels to the environment that you're in as like a player character and completely changing the way the game plays for like an actual person. Maybe just feel like yeah, okay, at this point, literally, like reality is like shaping itself around you. That's how it works here. Yes. No. And it's interesting because, just because I was going to say a like Matt Mercer is definitely a hard world builder, like in both stories it's like inside and out, the factions, the motives, the the more little elements in his storytelling, the kind of like we've the reality of everything together. Yeah, and it's to the point where he can like bring you to whatever part of the world, right, whatever part of the world, and he's like Yep, okay, already have something there for you guys. Hmm, just really cool. So, anyways, my take away from this whole from reading about this and just generally watching a couple videos, was I want to try some sort of softwa approach to like playing, and I say software approach as if like I don't know if these like these this grammars translating between the concept of the hard and soft world building. But anyways, the my issue there is that I just have never really done it. Stepping back, not only like yollowing it right, because I don't feel like it's entirely just make everything up as you go. I've done I've done that for exactly one session and it was the second last session, third last session, third last session of my homebrew campaign. That wrapped up, and I had wrote like since I've been busy for a couple of weeks leading up to it, so I didn't like write as much as I've normally would, but I had wrote like what I thought was going to be a pretty solid session and then we got through everything that I wrote in the first twenty minutes and I was just like, Oh my God, that is all I had and I can't just be like all right, good twenty good twenty minute session, everybody, I'll see in three weeks agoin so even you just we just ended up and I ended up improving on the spot like a full combat encounter, a full random encounter, including like improving the creatures and the STAP blocks of these creatures as I went and I'd kind of describe them and I kind of had this cool idea in my head and I described them and I started throwing in like I had a good idea of what I wanted their health to be in, a good idea of what I wanted a couple of their attacks to be in a what I wanted their resistances to be. So and then somebody would ask something and clarify a question and I just kind of have to be like on the spot, like yes, you can do that to them or no, you cannot do that to them because of this, and it was honestly, it was a lot of fun. It was. It was weird. I would not ever want to do a full campaign like that because I do not know nearly enough about the game itself to be able to do that with any sense of coherency. But for like one isolated session it was actually a lot of fun. Yeah, like, I'm thinking back to when we were reading about the on the DMG about like episodic campaigns, right, like in that kind of element, right, like where maybe you kind of just take your players through key events in some timeline. Right, that could be more of like a soft world building kind of campaign. But then again, I like you like you're saying. It's like. It's not. It's not necessarily like, Oh, I'm making everything up on the spot as we go, like I've done that before. It's fun. It's also like, okay, like, hope I don't kill everybody. Have you ever done that Jordan, and how did it go? Improv monsters and or encounters? Yeah, no, no, no, nope, nope, I know now. Noope. I have chosen to you know, like create monsters and and like, you know, think about them ahead...

...of time, come up with different abilities for them, that kind of thing, and then throw them at the party. But it is always pregenerated and if there is a random encounter in the world, it will be because I rolled it and there's a real monster in the monster manual that I can go and turn to, or there is a homebrew one that is already pregenerated for me, because I would I don't like having to think of those kind of things on the spot. I'd rather be like okay, I can look down at my sheet. Oh, yes, they have this much HP. I can look back up my players and be like okay, so now, like describe to me what's going on. I'd rather keep them involved in that part, rather than have my brain like half listening to them and half trying to figure out what the heck is this thing? I don't even know. God, hurry up create something. That would be me in my head. Yeah, I mean crafting a creature on the spot is pretty impressive if you can do that. I mean I'm sure there's DMS with lots of experiences can I was generally more talking about like I don't really know where the players are going to go next. I'm going to roll d six amount of GOBLINS. Oh, I see. I mean, I might do that sometime in the future if I feel like the stories lulling or something like that, but usually I'm like it would be to push the story. But that's what it would be. For if if I felt like, you know, they're they're you know, they're feeling like they're wandering and they're not really like doing anything with purpose, then I would feel like, okay, well, let's throw something at them that they care about, you know, and and I would think about that. Okay, well, what is motivating these players right now? Okay, well, you know this person, you know has this kind of like dark, darker past and you know that it's related to this person as well, and so okay, well, this person could be here, so let's bring that guy over and have them talk and show up and then the WHOA, like suddenly it's you know, the players are like we're related to that. That's a thing that happened in my past. I got a fallow that, you know. So for me to just like throw a random combat at them, that would be more like, oh well, I've run out of things to do for this session and I don't know what I'm doing next, let's throw a combat in there, because that takes time. The reason I said to D six. Yeah, yeah, I've had that happened from a layer perspective. Never done that as a DM, but we had one session that our friend heather was running and she got to the end of the session and we had done mostly RP and hadn't done any combat whatsoever and everybody was kind of Itchy for combat. So she was like, all right, you guys want combat, fine, we're doing dire wolves now. So we fought dire wolves and almost died because we were very low level and that did not work out so well for us. So we got what we wanted almost at the cost of some characters. Yeah, and that's the other thing, like the the random, like encounters and stuff like that. I wouldn't even think of that on the spot. I would go to Zannathar's guide or there's some stuff in wild mount as well for specific areas that are random encounters that you can come across. So it wouldn't be like well, let me think of, you know, something I can throw at them. That would be cool, unless, like I was thinking of that before the session even started and was like, Oh, yes, I want to do this combat thing because I think it's cool. So it's I don't know, I always think things through beforehand and then if I need randomness, then I look at out their people's thought process. Is stuff that's been done before. So No, I'm not great at Improv it's kind of my downfall there. So well, I know how to have fun in your campaigns. Now you're Gonna's agree with me, I know. All right. Well, that about wraps up everything that I want to talk about this week, but before I toss it over to you, Jordan, I do have to get something off my chest. No pisses me off. What? Well, the other day I was playing a druid and the Baddie started running away, jumped on a boat and managed to sail off. My first instinct was, well, let me jump into the water, turn into a fish and chase after it. Duh. But apparently I'm only level too and I can't do that for some reason. Well, that's right. Whatever will you do, Carlos? Well, they will.

Now the circle of the deep subclass is now on DM skilled, made by our very own door guard. If you've ever wanted to interact with sea life, swim at level to what crazy and have almost very as like really kind of strong abilities up in the higher levels brain. If you want to detail on those, we can certainly have a nice little bonus action with you falling the design of this. But Oh my God, finally you can send a level two. I think that's all I have to say, guys. Let need any you know what, I could have left it at that and had nothing else in the class. Of people would still jump on that? Yeah, let me let me tell you. Well, make sure you guys go check that out on DM skilled, the circle of the deep. All right, Jordan, all right, thank you for that. Very professionally done. Add Carlos and we will follow that up with another professionally done the segment here on the Dungeon Masters Guide. Guys, we're in chapter five, on page a hundred and four. We just finished talking about walls and doors in dungeons and how they're very important for your campaign and how it's going to be run. Now we're going to talk about Portcullis has. I think that's how you pronounced that. You were OK, this is this is very important stuff here. Okay, and like wait, just let me just summarize as quickly. This is not anything like doors with what's correct. It's it's very different, Carlos, thank you for asking. You know, doors are very different from Portcullis has because they put a separate section in the book here for it to separate section for walls too. So let's let's not. Yeah, it's too much credit brick versus wooden. All Right, I'm exhaust Lee thinking about this. Okay, let's jump into it. Portcullis is a Portcullis is a set of vertical bars made of wood or iron, reinforced with one or more horizontal bands. It blocks a passage or Ark way until it is raised up into the ceiling by a winch and chain. The main benefit of a Portcullis is that it blocks a passage while still allowing guards to watch the area beyond and make range attacks or cast spells through it. winching a Portcullis up or down requires an action. If a character can't reach the winch, usually because it's on the other side of the Portcullis. Lifting the Portcullis or bending its bars far enough apart to pass through requires a successful strength check. That the DC of the check depends on the size and weight of the Portcullis or the thickness of its bars to determine appropriate DC. Then we got to go to chapter eight, guys. Yeah, chapter it's going to talk a lot about like different random stuff and how to set DC's sort. So yeah, HMM, but yes, this is very important for your dungeons. Don't forget to add this in and make sure you're paying attention to or whether the winch is on the inside or outside of it, or whether there's one on both. I guess, yes, okay, should have for decide to integrate this into a dungeon. I will make a twitch account and do for the Royal City of society and just do a full live stream event where I profusely apologize. Apologize for my next statements because this is the dumbest thing we have talked about on this podcast the date, and we've talked about some pretty stupid things in this podcast, but that is just there's so much stuff that I want to know about from the DMG and on none of those lists do the port colorses of my doors make an appearance. Not a single list. It's so funny. I don't know, like if they're just like trying to tell you like different things that you can put in the dungeon. Like, you know, you can't possibly think of a Portcullis without, you know, having it written in the book there for you. It's like these are medieval things. Yeah, it's not all doors, guys. There's metal greats that you can get through Dah, but sometimes there wouldn't car los, so you know, they might hand burn it down. Yeah, it's great, guys. It's great. All right. You know, the Port Collis, you know, there could be some really cool sequences there that they always have fun. You can have some range attacks through it. You can like have people lift the bars up,...

...you know, while others passed through underneath it and that kind of thing. So could, you know, be an interesting segment, but like, it's not like I couldn't have thought of that. Yeah, did. It ran its own section, its own shading in the DM G. my votes for no stick. Yeah, foot note on the door section. I don't need a full extra. I'm mad. It's great. It's great. Unnecessarily Mad. There's no reason I should be really upset about. I mean, they have, they have so many tables for literally like everything else. They couldn't just make a table of possible entrances? Yeah, yeah, possible doorways, possible blockads and like just leave it for the DM to figure it out. Types of walls, of walls. Well, like, I mean I could definitely see that in being needed if there was like a mechanical difference. Like okay, like wooden walls, you can kick down any wooden wall with like DC ten strength whatever, right, like that's completely different than like a stone wall, where you can't kick it down right right. It's like you can't escape this dungeon versus you can just walk right through a house. Yeah, but like why? But at least it does sound like that. Yeah, that in Chapter Eight, which makes me exactly. Why is it also here? Yeah, yeah, because the important part is actually the DC's of of things really, because that's what I need to know. I know what a wall looks like. You know, I'm pretty sure the rest of you all know what a wall looks like, and I don't need different types of it to be described to me. What I need is how does that wall interact, sposit like, mechanically with my players? You know, can they break it down? What does that look like? How much does it require for you to be able to break this down or push it over or whatever, you know, that kind of thing. That that is the important part, not what it looks like. So I agree with I'm making an open concept dungeon just so I don't have to use any of these rules. No walls, no doors. It's more of an open space. The only blockages that are in they're are ones that you shot there for yourself. This sid you know, why does it for either? You know what? You got to make it like an infinite void. Yes, that that that's your new yeah, Yep, it's great. Then you don't have to worry about the next section either here, Braden, which is darkness and lightness. Yes, darkness is the default condition in an underground complex or in the interior of above ground ruins. But in inhabited dungeon might have light, light sources. So in subterranean settlements, even races that have dark vision use fire for warmth, cooking and defense. But many creatures have no need of warmth or light. Adventures must bring their own sources of light into dusty tombs where only undead stand guard, abandoned ruins teeming with predatory monsters and uses and natural caverns where sightless creatures hunt. A light. The light of a torch or lantern helps the characters see over a short distance, but other creatures can see that light from light source, from far away. Right light in an environment of total darkness can be visible for miles, though a clear line of sight over such a distance is rare underground. Even so, adventures using light sources in a dungeon often attract monsters. Just says Dungeon. Features that shed light, from foster is fungi to the glow of magical portals can draw adventures attention. So you know, darkness and light is a thing. Yes, that goes through the pork collis sometimes. Yeah, I guess it's just trying to say, you know, think about whether you're dungeon has light or not and, if so, make sure the creatures have the sights required to see in that environment. So, HMM, guys, are quality is another thing that we have to talk about here. Subterranean tuttles above and above ground ruins are often in close spaces with little air flow. Though it's rare for a dungeon to be sealed so tightly that adventures have trouble breathing, the atmosphere is often stifling and oppressive. What's more, Odor's linger in a dungeon and can be magnified by the stillness of the atmosphere. That's very important for your campaign. It's probably going to change everything about your campaign and and how it goes forward because of this illness of the atmosphere and in a dungeon. Admittedly, this is actually a section that I don't mind because, like this, this leads to you thinking about things like like how, when we wrote the fires below, we had...

...a whole section dedicated specifically to the air, because the air is polluted with smoke, right, because the air actually becomes a hazard. So this is even if it doesn't, maybe you're not done the second, but even if it doesn't necessarily go in that direction, that, at least to me, is on the same wavelength of starting to think about okay, well, the air can be different things. Is it hard to breathe? Is Right, pleasant to walk into? I've got a DC check in deeper than the I can see just to enter a room because this sensh is so overpowering bad. Yes, so stuff like that I can actually see being, Mechanna, sure, important, as opposed colors, which is still making me angry, right, but I will I will point out that in here it literally does not talk about any of the stuff that you mentioned, any of the traps or hazards or potential ways of using DC's or constitution checks because of ODS. It literally just says there could be odors here and also there is usually air for them to breathe. You're welcome. Yeah, so it's a little less descriptive than I would like, but at least because me like thinking about are yes a potential use? Yes, what does the best colors make me think about port colors? Thank yeah, all right, let's see what you think of the last section here. Of of these things that are needed in a dungeon sounds. So a dungeons and enclosed geography helps channel sound. The groaning creak of an opening door can echo down hundreds of feet of a passage away. Louder noises, such as the clanging hammers of a forge or the didn't of battle can, ever, beat or reverbate, reverberate, that's it, through an entire dungeon. Many creatures that live underground use such sounds as a way of locating prey or go on alert at any sound of an adventure ring parties intrusion. So yeah, stealth checks. I like that. It's unrealistic for people to think they can just kind of bash their way through something and nobody's getting react in the slightest right. And I've had that. It's like people are like having huge fights and I'm like yeah, and then the people that are in the next room over commit. They're like what do you mean? It's like what do you mean? What Young? You're all like screaming and character talk about yeah, letting it, like all these godural war cries, like of course the guy for the next room over is going to come and see what the heck's going on. Yep, exactly, and it also is useful for like, Oh, well, you can hear the din of, you know, a forge, you know the hammer being brought down on, you know, metal in the you know, fruit a few rooms down or something like that. In avengers go oh, what's that? I'm going to follow that sound. You know, could be good, could be bad, who knows? Yeah, I gives the bit of a hook, gives them a reason to keep going, gives them a designation. HMM, all right. Let's jump into the next section. Here the the hazards, dungeon hazards. So the hazards described here are but a few examples of the environment dangers that can be found underground and in other dark places. Dungeon hazards are functionally similar to traps, which are described at the end of this chapter. So detecting a hazard. No ability check is required to spot a hazard unless it is hidden. A hazard that resembles something benign, such as a patch of slime or mold, can can be correctly identified with a successful intelligence nature check. Use Guidelines in chapter eight to set an appropriate DC for any check made to spot or recognize a hazard. Chapter Eight's going to be important, I feel like skip it. Yeah, or causes part two. That's right, guys. I don't think we talked about it enough, so they definitely are going to bring it up again. Hazard severity. So to determine a hazard's deadliness relative to the characters, think of a head of the hazard as a trap and compare the damage it deals with the parties level using the damage severity by level table later in this chapter. The table also appears in Chapter Eight. I am glad that it shows up in this chapter as part of like the Dungeon Hazard Section, although chapter eight seems to have a lot of the like DC's and stuff like that, so I can see why they would put it there too. So it will be nice to just kind of go back to chapter eight all the time for all the stuff that I really need to know about my dungeons. Yeah, so I think it goes in here now to describe a few different potential hazards that you can find here. They got...

Brown old. So Brown old feeds on warmth, drawing heat from anything around it. A patch of Brown mold typically covers a ten foot a square area and the temperature within thirty feet of it is always frigid. Interesting when a creature moves to within five feet of the mold for the first time on a turn or starts its turn there, it must make a DC twelve constitution saving throw, taking twenty two or d ten cold damage on a failed safe or half as much on a successful one. My goodness, that is a lot Chalton mold. Oh, like, that's that's that's a lot like. I mean especially for like something that's like. Okay, I'm moving closer to this thing. Oh, the air's a little bit colder. Okay, I'm going to walk a little bit closer to this thing. Oh now I take twenty two points of cold damage. Great, glad, I move closer to this thing. Didn't even have to step in it. That's interesting to me. All right, Brown mold is immune to fire, and any source of fire brought within five feet of a patch causes it to instantly expand outward in the direction of the fire. Oh, that's awesome, covering a ten foot square area with the source of the fire at the center of the area. So a patch of brown mold expose to an effect that deals cold damage is instantly destroyed. So the thing that does cold damage to people is instantly destroyed. By cold damage, but fire it is immune to and will in fact attack anything with fire that is or any sources of fire near it. That's really interesting, super cool. I like it. I'm gonna bring that in. Some time before warned party, moved party of wild mount all right, green slime, green slimes. Another guy here that you know. Another hazard. So this is CIDIC slime. Devours Flesh, organic material and metal on contact. Bright Green, wet and sticky. It clings to walls, floors and and ceilings in patches. That's why we talked about walls and floors earlier. MMM. A patch of green slime covers a five foot square, has blind sight out to a range of thirty feet and drops from walls and ceilings when it detects movement below. Beyond that it has no ability to move. A creature aware of the slime presence can avoid being struck by it with a successful DC ten dexterity saving through. Otherwise, the slime can't be avoided as it drops. A creature that comes into contact with with the slime takes five one D ten acid damage. The creature takes the damage again at the start of each of its turns until the slime is scraped off or destroyed. Against Wood or metal, green slime deals eleven, or to be ten, acid damage each ground or any non magical wood or metal or tool used to scrape it off, the slime is effectively destroyed. Okay, well, slim boode. HMM, sunlight, any effect that cures disease and any effect that deals cold, fire or radiant damage destroys a patch of green slime. So definitely not as deadly as the brown mold, but green slime could be very interesting as well. I am liking that they're adding in like the DC's and the damage that it deals in that kind of thing right here in this part so that I know and I don't have to go and look it up in a different section. It's very still. How do you guys deal with this kind of information in your games, like if that's like, let's say you have adventures, is sort of like knowledge of Climb Green Times and Brown mold does do to the characters. Immediately recognize it and like a nature check or something. I was gonna say that might well probably be some kind of a nature check for me, but would you prompt the nature check or without yeah them? If they said something along the lines of life. Do I know what this is and really make any if they're just like Oh, yeah, there's I'm deriving from the ceiling and it looks like it's dangerous and that's all that. They take it out of face value, then that's probably like I guess. I guess the question is more so like do you let the player know based on what his character would already know? Because, like, if you have somebody that's would immediately recognize that, but just because the player didn't ask, Hey, is that dangerous? Yeah, I mean I'm also that a couple times. Like I'm more like a passive like a passive type of with some characters. I'll be like like if I know that they specifically would know, and not just in the situation like we have. I have a wizard character...

...in one campaign and so he's a little bit shy on being like, Oh, you know what I know about this. So, especially if they're like in a library or something and it's like our connor related, I'll be like you making this kind of check right now, because you're the kind of person that would know exactly what this is. What, or at least he has the most likelihood out of the party to have any kind of clue. HMM. But I would say, like for Dungeon Hazards in general, like I think the idea is that most of them should be like just starting out their adventuring career and so might have heard of these hazards potentially, but you know, seeing them and hearing of them are two completely different things. So that's why I think it's like no ability check is required to spot the hazard, as it talks about earlier, in detecting a hazard, but it will resemble something benign. So, like it's like a patch of slime or patch of mold, isn't necessarily going to be like Whoa, I should definitely destroy that thing as quickly as possible. It's more likely going to be like, all right, well, let's get closer and figure out what it is, kind of thing. You know, if they decide I'm just going to ignore it, then maybe that's when they get hit by these hazards. But then they do have the you know, you can make an an intelligent nature check to kind of like decide what these things are, and that might give you some information on what the what it is. So yeah, and I would say like unless, like, the character like explicitly talked about how they had encountered green slime in their past before, I'd say they probably haven't like encountered it before. So they do need to make that check in the future. If there's green slime all over the place, you know, they probably already know what it is after encountering it at one time. Right, well, what think? I would hopefully, if they've done that, then you don't need to prompt anything because the player remember exactly exactly, which would be then in character as well, because the character should also remember that one time that they got hit by a slim that dropped from the ceiling. Kind of thing. Passage check should be more common. Yes, I mean like information that the DM just dival just the party based on their skill sets. Yeah, for sure, but this is hazard. So you don't want to just like throw in a hazard and be like Oh, yeah, by the way, you already know what this is and so you can completely avoid it if you want to. Yeah, guess, I guess, but like, but that's like, well, why did you even put the hazard in then? Right, yeah, but like someone with a high survival would like that would tell me that that character would know how to survive more, which means know in general threats, know in general whatever. And then therefore, you know, maybe something that's green slime is. Yeah, they might know like, Oh, you probably shouldn't touch it, that that might be some information I would devulge to that keut type of a person, but I wouldn't necessarily say that they know what it is or what it can do. I guess I guess about like why not? Why would you keep information from the players that they might know? Well then, why is it in the like? Then I would wonder why you included as part of the encounter, because then it's just this extra flavor that's you know, they're but they're just going to go around it anyway. So I mean, unless they're planning on like using it to like, you know, as a trap for enemies. You know, I guess that's a potential but yeah, I don't know. I I guess it depends on the situation. All right, let's get through the last two here and then I'll hand it over to Braden. So there's webs, so giant spiders. We've thick, sticky webs across passages and at the bottom of pits to snare prey. These web filled areas are difficult terrain. Moreover, a creature entering a webbed area for the first time on a turn or starting its turn there must succeed on a DC twelve dexterity saving throw or become restrained by the webs. A restrained a restrained creature can use its action to try and escape, doing so with as sick, successful DC twelve strength athletics or dexterity acrobatics. Check. Each ten foot cube of giant webs has an AC of ten fifteen hit points, is vulnerable to fire and immune. Has Immunity to bludgeoning, piercing and slat psychic damage. Sorry, not slashing. It is still you are able to hit. It was slashing. That's cool. I like that that there's a difference between the Bludston, piercing slashing stuff. Yellow Mold. Yellow mold grows in dark places and one patch covers a five foot square. If touch, the mold ejects a cloud of spores that fills a ten foot cube. Originating from the mold. Any creature in the area must succeed on a DC fifteen constitution saving throw or take two D ten poison damage.

And become poisoned for one minute. While poisoned in this way, the creature takes five, one, D ten poison damage. At the start of each of its turns. The creature can repeat the saving throw at the end of each of its turns. Any the effect on it success, on itself, on a successful safe sunlight or any amount of fire damage instantly destroys one patch of yellow mold. Easy. There we go. So fire, bring fire. When going in to our actually bring fire and cold. We're going into dungeons, it's important always carry a wizard. Yes, but that's all for me, braiden. All Right, actually, do we have a thing? That'll depends on what the heck you're talking about. I don't know. And add is there an ad now? Is that? Is that the thing? Well, yes, and, as I was about to say, let's take a second to to your word from our, you know, sponsors. That's right. Okay, so it's time for some talk of the town. Is that segment where we ask you the Society of question and then we answer that question ourselves, and that we respond to your answers to that questions. Then sometimes we've respond to the answers of the answers of our questions, which doesn't happen often, but it's a great yeah, I don't like getting monger. It doesn't get shorter. I mean before, before we run away from this too far, but you do know that in the last couple of episodes, every time you say we're going to get a word from our sponsors, it just goes to you saying, okay, I don't because I have been in serving every that's interesting. That's something to take up with a YO. Yeah, I've been. I've been meaning to fuck this for a while. Those of you that follow us, let us know what you think of the ADS and if we're having problems with the adds, and also we don't get to see what's getting advertised on our channel, the APP, I suppose, the moment. Nothing. Well, well, the service that we use, do we have stuff before and after? Doesn't seem like yees. Okay, I don't know if it's just like a spot for people to put in ads. Maybe we just misunderstood how where that's that's entirely possible. Yeah, that that spot should be filled with ads. If like, we can't see what's being advertised there. So if you have a problem with stuff that's being advertised on our channel. It's all pretty screen, but if you see anything problematic, please let us know. A Sup. I just keep forgetting to pluck that, but that is important to note. So back onto I don't even know what my segment is anymore. That one. This week's question. The talk of the town is and it's it's it is a talk, it is a talk and this is the town. I don't know. What is your favorites unpopular DD opinion? What opinion do you hold about dd that you know is not widely received, and this got a lot of attention online. So I'm very excited to talk about this. Who wants to go first? Sure, I gave my two answers. Someone we tell you real than sure. Sure, all right, so I've got a coup boy. I guess that I can think of, you know, like I know there's my players by actually know more about my like unpopular dand opinions. But here's what I could come up with. I used to hold hard to the racial like ability score bonuses when people were creating their characters. I like to think of it as like it was a genetic, you know, disposition that they were given, like okay, here's your you know, you are an ORC and so you're stronger than most people. But ever since Hashes came out, I was I was like, okay, now there's roles in there that, you know, kind of say that's kind of like, you know, out the window. And and so I've just kind of been seeing it. Now is like, okay, well, this is now just training. It's like class stuff, like what makes your person a person kind of thing, as opposed to a racial bonus. It's no longer that really, but it does like raise the question of like, okay, if I choose the Dwarf, the Mountain Dwarf specifically, which gets a plus two to strength and a plus two to Constitution, does that mean I get to, you know, play with those with all four points there it comparatively to the three that most classes are, most races get, because that could be pretty pretty interesting, pretty powerful if, if it could be maybe a little bit abused, but I I have yet seen it, see it, so maybe it's not that it's at anyways, if there's already four points available to you, than that's already stretching the limits of...

...what you can write that class. So I don't know. If it's abuse so much as you're just using what's already yeah, yeah, I get that. It's just that it's four points that are in specific stats. So it's limits what you can do with it. Now this person could, you know, do Tu in constitution into in wisdom, let's say, if the planet cleric, you know, or you know, I don't know. Like they could put it in four different stats too, and so you only have to spend five points if you're using stat point by system, to bump four different stats up to a teen. Yeah, so, I mean, yeah, I don't know. I haven't actually done the work to like figure out whether it's that powerful or not. It was just the thought that I was like, that's interesting. That's one of the only classes that gets you, you know, four points. Oh, also the human could I like put six points into a single stat or they I don't think. I don't. Certainly can have twenty strength and nine dexterity, nine constitution and just die. I guess rests everything else. But like no, those are like the ratio bonuses. That doesn't include the point by stuff. So you could put six points into something and then that's just like you could have a twenty score by spending seven out of your twenty. Seven points that you can spend in the point by stuff. So you have another twenty points that can put into the other stats. It's food for thought. I don't I wouldn't run it that way. I probably say humans just get everything already. So just that you get one and everything, period, kind of thing. But yeah, humans are the best race in DD they're the most yeah, yeah, it's well, I like it because you can get feats. It's fun. Feazzare Fun and you can choose them very into human it's so much fun because you can choose what your character is good at instead of having, you know, like, okay, well, my ORC gets, you know, relentless endurance. Well, okay, that's that's a good ability. But like, is it as good as him having great weapon master right at the beginning? Maybe not. You know, who knows? It could be, could could not be. Depends how you're playing. So it's fun that way. The other thing that the super the real unpopular thing that I was going to talk about, though, was alignment chart. Is Important and we talked about this before, so I'm not going to go into the reasons, but it's important that, needless to say. I over sort of. Yeah, it's important to the one percent of players. That's right as right. So there's your own popular opinion. You're right, that's unpopular. Correct, I think, Carlos, you want me to get into yours. When we talk about the dist go for know. You haven't. I don't want to repeat them. That's fine. I'll plug mine quickly, and that's that. Multi Classic Sucks. I know that is a pot because I have multi class. I like it for flavor. I hate it as a mechanic. I don't find it. I find that if you're multi classing, it's just for flavor and you end up kneecapping yourself in terms of the actual performance. Yeah, you all. It's called a dip, you know. Yeah, tip and power for the flavor, potential, versatility. So you are definitely kneecapping your yeah, it is. That is correct, airs, which is why I kind of like these new subclasses that are kind of shifting themselves towards like not having a need to multi class like a lot of them have. Here the cool feats. You're the cool conteen class. Just don't level into it. Yeah, exactly. Yeah, like here's the stuff that you need to run exactly the kind of flavor base character that you want without actually having to destroy which all the way over us. Yeah, yeah, I agree. Now I have also done it. If hear those, if they had like a sacking mechanic to these heats, like, let's say, you could get like sneak attack from a feat and then if you find you leveled into rogue, you can get like improved sneak attack damage. Then maybe there's a conversation there, but otherwise a lot of there's a lot of stuff to starts tracking. As soon as you do that, I will I will agree with you and saying that multi class generally will suck for your character. Maybe that's not as unpopular as I thought, but I brought that up to several people and people really like moll the passing. So but then what matters is that you're wrong. Currently, I mean, people enjoy multi classing because they like trying out the different abilities and because they like the flavor of it. So I only multi class. I only multi class because there was, you know, an opportunity for me to become...

...like a warlock type character and I was like this makes sense for my character. Is it going to suck for stats. For sure, like it did not help me mechanically, not a whole lot anyway. So, but it was fun to like have that whole flavor part and story element of it. So, yeah, I would agree. Mechanically sucks. Yeah, all right, so I'll do our glugs from online and then get to Carlos as well, who's in there? Because well, first of all let me talk about our instagram before we get into the other half of what we did this week. Because of our instagram we have our manage one hundred and one. It's been a while, dude, haven't heard from you. It's has to hear from you again. Says that there doesn't have to be a lot of combat with the quest to be fun and exciting. Big Agree, big agree. I really like that. I don't as somebody who primarily likes RP versus combat. It doesn't it's not necessary, it's nice, it's good, it's good to have. I'm not saying that you shouldn't have combat, but it's not like a die hard rule that every session has to have combat, especially especially if you just plugging it just so you have combat in the session. Yeah, I think it's like almost an expectation. You know that it's like dd is about the combat. So if we don't have combat in a session, that it's like what are we even playing dd any here? Well, yes, we're playing DD. It's a role play game. Not, you know, you want nonstop hack out tags every stapy more. Yeah, table type or gaming. HMM. Now, I thoroughly enjoy combat. So if they're if I go like three, three sessions for sessions without combat, I start to get a little bit of Anti Oh see, I can go sessions at a time with no combat with no problem. Yeah, yeah, I just enjoy the combat element of it and so I like having it there at some point. It doesn't need to be there for most sessions. Like one, two, three sessions would be like my like all right, you know, let's do something. Now it's like what, what are we doing here? So I but yeah, overall I would agree. All right, let's take a look over at our community to discord, because I I started asking questions on here and I started a war, which is fun. Never ASK PEOPLE'S UNPOPULAR DD opinions in an open forum like our community to Scorp. It leads to hilarity. So we got our main man and frequent contributor, dcups responding, and I knew this about him and I got to say I agree with him on this. I've been using it a lot in my brew campaigns, especially another we're online. Distances and ranges in squares or feet are dumb and create road blocks for fun engaging creative combat. Hashtag abolish ranges, he says. He means that in both weapons spell ranges and movement distance. So we had a follow up question. Where's I'm scrolling out. Our user, Blue Basle, responded. What are you curious about this? Like what do you mean? Like does that mean like infinite range? Like how do you mean? And D gaffs responded with his motto, which he said a couple times before, is close is close enough and far as too far away. So he tends to not think in feet, in inches. He sends to think about like it in this situation that we're playing in my theater of mind game. Can I do this? Yes, you can. You are within range that you can use your movement to do that. Or know you are not in range, that you can use your movement to do that. You're like a hundred feet away. No, you can't run up in MELEA somebody if you're like thirty five to forty feet away, he's probably going to let you move up to the enemy and clock it, because that's going to be more creative, more fun, and it's not going to be like Oh, I'm ten feet short, I guess I'll just keep moving in the next six seconds. Yeah, but there was another side to that. I believe that. I mean, I mean you said you started a war. Well then, not, not about this one specifically. The other side to that is our man Hex, you just said. Can't confirm that. Opinion. Is Unpopular and I disagree wildly, but that's kind of where that one ended. Yeah, I mean, I'm kind of with hext here, to be honest, but that's the strategy gamer coming out in me. More than anything. I like being able to move a certain number of feet and knowing, okay, well, this person can also only move this many feet, so now I can calculate, okay, this would be a safe distance for me to stand...

...in order to fire at this person without having to worry about them coming up and attacking me for this turn, you know. But, and we got that getting into the conversation of if that's Meta, because it's not really like your character standing in the fight wouldn't be like, all right, I'm exactly thirty feet away, so the spells going to stop short. Well, my face like that's not that's your right, stick, but you're right. But an archer who's standing, you know, forty feet away, probably thinks, okay, I'm forty feet away, I can probably shoot at this person without them, you know, being able to run up to me within a second and be able to attack me and melee without me first being able to run away. You know. You know distance already is a little bit funky in D and D in general. But an archer would have a general idea as to how fast a person can move and would keep pace as much as they can with that person to stay away from them and make firing like shots at them from distance so that the melee person can't get up there. Sure, but that's how I lively do that, without literally accounting for every square foot that everybody is. That's not that's not necessary to do what. Yeah, but it gets it gets difficult in so far as like then you're saying, well, okay, I stand far enough away that I think he won't be able to reach me, but also close enough that I can fire, and then also I would like to then run away next turn, far enough away that he can't catch up to me, but also close enough that I can fire. And it to me. I'm just like, well, I've got thirty feet of movement. I just move thirty feet. Okay, there we go, done, end of turn. Or I dash or, you know, I take the dodge action this turn and try and catch up to them next turn, kind of thing, or corner them or find ways of using the environment to my advantage based on the you know, the the grid system, which becomes part of my strategy in that, you know, I can corral the person, which has a little bit more won key when you're just kind of being like yes, I'm in this room and he is also in this room and we're close enough. So I mean, it can be run that way and it is. It could be fun. I am just a strategy person and I like my strategy. So we're going to hate. That's coming campaign. I mean I expect it for your campaign and I am at peace with it. So, you know, it's totally cool. I can run with it. It's just my preference. If I had a choice is the grid system. That's that's just me and I know lots of other people would disagree with that, and you know they you know, it's totally totally fun either way. I just prefer the grid. That's all all right. Well, that we that. We have Carlos coming through with some extremely hot takes. Yeah, which is the first? Is that each players should only have six seconds, I are real, to decide what to do each term. D gups agrees, says it's too generous. All players need to do need to say what they're doing simultaneously, and then he hits the swords in real life. YEA, getting to Laur pingdcups. It's a lot of fun. Can confirm it's basically mat what you describe right now, those six weet yeah, into virtual yeah, I don't reality, laughing, yes, virtual rob yeah, awesome. Then Carlos came through with my real answer, is that inventory should be tracked, which got some push back, but I don't disagree with that. Oh, I mean, maybe some things, but I wouldn't. Well, okay, like I've been trying. Let me pick away at that for a second, Dan, that the DM should be tracking their players imagery, or do you mean that the player should have an idea of what they have on them, or do you mean that like waiting carrying capacity should be tracked? I mean both. Yeah, DM's should keep track of their players inventories, for sure, and players should generally know what they have available to them. Encumber into something that I that's not necessarily part of like inventory management, and encumbrance is more of like a do you want to make the gold in your world a little bit more scarce, because, like, the reason encumbrance makes sense is because otherwise everybody kind of has a portable hole. If you don't, yeah, so that's okay with you, then that's fine, but they should still have an idea of what's in that portable hole. If that is the case, I've ruled this. I ruled this a little bit Lucy Goosey. So I agree that the DM should have a good idea what their players have. A players should have a good idea of what they themselves have. I'm not wild on incumbrance as it's written, especially when...

...it comes I don't I don't use a cumbers and when it comes to money I'm pretty lenient, especially. But the one thing, like I had one player that tried to loot twenty. He was a gun slinger who tried to loot twenty pistols off of dead bodies and just keep them. He's like I have the I can carry them, I've got the encumberts. I'm like that's fine. Where you going to put them? Because your backpack is a finite space. It would not fit these twenty guns on top of the ridiculous amount of crap you've already gotten your backpack. So he literally like he had to walk around with just guns strapped all over his body. You can say about anything else, right. Adams like I just want to buy three hundred arrows so I don't have to buy arrows again. It's like, well, yeah, unless you have a bag of holding, can only realistically have like twenty. Yet that's where I try and sell them on the I think. I don't know, I don't think it's called the quiver of holding, but it's like that. It's the same thing as like a quever writhing spend. It exactly quiver with like the dimensions. Well, do you that? Well, like, I mean in part, though. In part. The reason why it's important to me is because, like, now that we're mentioning quivers. It's like when you're playing those other games when you get a bigger bag of bombs or a bigger quiver or even like a big Rupie Pouch, like you get excited for that, something to work towards in the game. That's not like a campaign element, right, it's I want to get that fucking rude like I want to get that extra touch, you know, so I can carry more arrows, I can do more damage. It's like, Oh, cool, you just leveled up, you can fire more arrows, you know, faster, but you're running out faster, you know like that, like those are the kinds of like little goals in game that I think can only be like you gotta track it get out. Yeah, that's my it's the RPG Gamer in you. Yeah, that's like, yeah, we gotta upgrade these things and get that stuff. I think I was listening to, or you watching a video recently on on the critical role cast and I think it was like Laura had bought like a thousand arrows or something like that, but basically she just like was like here's, you know, the coin that I would need in order to spend and anytime she goes into town she picks up enough automatically, essentially, to be able to continue realistically on the on to the next area without having to worry about running out of air. I like that. But just the like this. Yeah, it makes things a little bit less complicated, but it also like if you do have an extended dungeon, you know, when do you then say, well, now you're out of arrows because you fired fifty of them already, you know, or something like that were going on and extended Dune journals at least that there was a trend of them going on an extended journey, then presumably they would would have more for thought to pick up. Yeah, lot, especially considering, I think, that Matt's at at one point that like they got the bag of holding, so it was realistic for them to just buy mass quantities of Arrow at a time and just dump them right egg and take them out. is needed. Yeah, it's just it does. It does like part of that strategy element is to a certain extent lost when you do that kind of thing right. But I think it makes the game cleaner and easier. It makes some more so, which is the thing. Like I'm all for that. Yeah, if there's one less thing that you have to keep track of, like that's tedious and that's straight up getting in the way of you having a good time, then I'm all for it. Yes, now, mind you, it can be. It could be really cool if a person like you know doesn't have access to their arrows for something, you know, and normally they fire arrows. But if I maybe, if I want to do that, I'll add some sort of story element that's like well, you know, you got captured in your weapons were taken away or something like that, and then they have to find their way out and get their items again, kind of thing. I don't know, but it could be. It could be really interesting to have an extended dungeon where they do run out of certain materials and they have to really work on that resource management part. But that's only for certain players that you know. It would depend on the people you're playing with. Most of the time I think it's it's for the most part tedious, and so people would just like Nah, just you, you have stuff, your fine, you fire, you can eat your rations and you're not going to run out. You know, it's fine, you're good. Yes, you can game and hunt and whatever. It's easy and Apia and then the final thing that we have coming from Carlos is that digital dice is just as good as real dice, and I'm not even gonna acknowledge that. That's wrong. You're wrong, just absolute heresy, as you said. Feel bad for even thinking those thoughts. That's right out of here. Times that I've just been like shit, I need to set up for DD, whip out my like phone, my ipad. I can just jump right into a game with no worries. Don't. I'm is it that hards just same said of dice, the same way you take your phone in an IPAD. No,...

...it's not. It's about the same difficulty. But I can play DD without dice on my ipad anywhere. Are On my phone anywhere and it's just easy because I just carry my headphones, jump into the discord chat and start playing. See. But you don't see. You don't see the upsides of not being table locked. My God, but you I mean like it really depends where you're trying to go, because I mean the mic have a Coleg wherever I want. It's going on in the scenario I'm just saying, I can go outside. I could be playing on a train, possibly in a hypothetical scenario that it's a much more versatile than real dice are, although I love a real dice. My statement is they are the same, but they feel this not can't believe you, Carlos, is my good and I feel like like when you're in kindergarten and then it's like you guys don't even know. I've been using digital dice for my last couple of campaigns and no one knows. I feel like when it's like yeah, come on, there's no such thing as a dumb question, and then somebody says something and it's like, no, I was wrong, that's a dumb question. This is this is the DD unpopular equivalent of that, like, you can't be that. I'm yopular note weed can be and it is NA statement. Absolutely. I'm sure that someone somewhere I agrees, and they do and they're wrong. That's right. So that's going to do your like society, we're wrong together. That's going to do it for this week's triple advantage. If you like what you hear, if you want to be part of the conversation, follow us on our socials. That's at Royal City Society on Instagram at real city social on twitter. Links to the community discord are in both. As Carlos mentioned, we have new projects that are constantly coming out. We have one that just came out, we have more that are coming out very soon. Jordan spearheading the next one. It's going to be really good. I'm super excited for that. And aside from that, stay tuned for new episodes of triple advantage every single Monday, except for this Monday because we screwed up. We'll see you next time.

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