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Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 3, Episode 23 · 1 year ago

Ep. 47 - Candlekeep Theories

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this week's episode of Triple Advantage, the gang looks at Candlekeep Mysteries, the newest announced release from Wizards of the Coast, discuss how to create meaningful encounters, and look at their favorite third-party supplements used in-game.

On today's episode of Triple Advantage, we take you through the candlekeep mysteries, the newest book announced by Wizards of the coast. On divining, the DMG will discuss and counter creation, how to structure successes and failures for your party to drive a narrative. And finally, in talk of the town, we discuss our favorite third party modules. The society had lots to say this week. Stay tuned and roll the episode. Hello, members of the society, and on Today's echoes of the Oatlands we're going to be talking about candlekeep mysteries, the newest announced release from wizard of the coast and, as tradition, the onslought of advertisements and quite quite crafty content creation by your boy James Haig over at dnd beyond on today's segment. Fuck me, what am I going with this? Briton Jordan, have you to to put this? I mean, I've got the ADS for it, I haven't actually liked looked at it yet. I know that it's supposed to be about mysteries or something like that, I think, but that's about it. I got the email and was like Oh yeah, okay, there's this new cool thing coming out, I'll look at it another time, and then it just got lost a little bit. So I haven't actually looked at how a chance take a look at it yet. So I know it's also not yet released. It's been released later, right later this month, I think, or maybe next month. Yeah, yeah, I know it's supposed to be soon. Oh, March sixteen. There we go. I mean it's it's like one of these hit him hard with the ads and yea, is it everywhere for lease book, although like for what? For what? From what I'm seeing, like it's like seventeen short stories. The setting here takes place in the Library of candle keep, and from what I assume is that this you, you, all these stories are found within magical tones in the Library of candle keep. So, I mean it gives you a chance to incorporate this in almost any library setting in a city. And something that I notice as well is that part of their advertisement as well now includes a lot of the lore components for candlekeep. They just release the twenty minute video here explaining the background, and I think that this is something that I really like. The especially for like DD beyond to use is because it's sort of quickens the on ramping period for this kind of book like it kind of makes it seem like you can. You can definitely run adventures like this. You know so much of the lare already right. So the the settings then? Sorry. Is it takes place anywhere, or is it like set specifically in the forgotten realms kind of thing, or what exactly? Have they stated? that it takes place in the Great Library of candle keep, vasterpository of information, Mundane and magical, weird and worrisome. This is the greatest source of knowledge in the sorts coast, a source coast. Okay, cool, but I think, I think the whole thing is like essentially each one of these seventeen things is a story that you can find in the library. So you are essentially living out the story. That is really cool. To one of them. That's like a one shot just with the that's so cool. I'll keep mysteries with candle keep kind of as...

...a backing thing. So it's does say that they can be run. Is One shot games plugged into an existing forgotten realms campaign or adapted to other campaign settings. I don't think I necessarily have to run them as like a tale found in a book. I think they can just be. But like as far as the Lore for the the these stories is, they they are like tales within the library. Yeah, I'll keep right but like that's what I'm saying. Like you can like it's kind of like M it's kind of like the yawning portal, right, where it's the physical location takes place in water deep out the yawning portal tavern, but here the stories and stories in the yawning portal. Yeah, you will, you actually go to these locations? Yeah, yeah, anyways, so it's very similar in that matter and I do like that. I like that there is a lot of them, because that probably means that they're going to be shorter adventures. Like maybe I'm expecting that these are all going to be like two, three hours further to be seventeen in one book, which I was like exciting for me because I like that format more. Yeah, yeah, I've got it. I've got a small theory about this and I don't know if it's correct, but I wouldn't be surprised if it is, because this is following up pretty hot on the heels of Tasha's which introduced a stupid amount of new subclasses and class options and player creation options. So I'm wondering if they're following it up with a book of one shots so that you can actually try out all that stuff because of some tops her game design. But when you when you jump into like a long form campaign, you're probably playing one character for a long time. So if they released another campaign book, If you wanted to try out Tasha's new content, you're going to be trying out one of those yeahs for a long time. Versus this lets you try out a bunch of those things. If you were to run through each of these seventeen adventures, you could play each of them as a completely different character. You can try a bunch of different builds that you're thinking a bunch of new ideas that you want to incorporate. So I wouldn't patch is also purposefully Tasha's also has a bunch of like DM tools and stuff like that too. So I wonder if maybe some of the like new rules or things that they have specifically stated in there are going to be like a part of that one like wow, which would be really cool to kind of like test out those mechanics that it was talking about, you know, in a more, I guess contained way, if that makes sense. Yeah, that is very interesting also, and I said Carlos, very choppedier design. Yeah, well, I mean I think I think it's to be expected, like a you you're talking about a company that has literally made just games, and these kinds of game for like these Games with like interactions between people. So obviously they're going to factor that into their marketing strategies, that release schedules. I feel like that's very expected from wizards to the coast and actually welcomed. Right because like, for example, just like introducing the lore behind it and giving players a little bit of like early access to this kind of stuff right, obviously draws your attention further. It makes you more attached to the contents already and from a game perspective, right, like you have to spend less time teaching people where they are and what they can expect to do. I think it is, although you do mentioned that, at least it gives you a chance to try these characters written. These adventures are from levels one to sixteen, and so I mean, if you're going to be changing character and classes every two levels, or would you again just try to keep the same character? are kind of adventure, like it's are you sure that they are all like connected, all these? That's true? I don't think that's an assumption. I think that's an asumption. It's not like there's standalone like look like it could be. Yeah, that's fair, like...

...yeah, one for Level One, one for level two, one for level three, etc. There's seventeen of them, right, so maybe there's just an extra level five or something like that, who knows? Or they're just split it up a little bit differently than that. Obviously. I guess it's because when I read the law, I kind of a kind of pictured this as like a cave of the eels type that I would be cool to run like an intrigue kind of campaign where like maybe these are like long lost magical tones and your parties wizard happens upon one of them and like, Oh my God, this book leads to another book and all of a sudden you're in this like right wizarding world of library that nobody know existed or something like that. And and it totally could just follow one party two. You're right, like that could be really interesting to where it's all about like this super detective e type team that like because they all have to do with like mystery, right, or the super at a Jumaji game. Right. Yeah, I would like to run like a stream or something for this, where somebody is like running for other people and they do all seventeen mysteries kind of separately. Yeah, yeah, but the the DM is less of like a DM and they're less of describing, like so you rule this investigation and now you find this. But I'd like to hear more of like they're almost like the Lord keeper and they're reading from the book and it's like they're they're narrating straight from the book. So as the players are doing something, it's like, Oh, Y, a, then vents ventured forth into the forest and there they found. So it's less of like this happens to you and more of like you're speaking and omnipresent third person, as if you're literally reading a book from candle keep. I see. Yes, I can't prefore, we're saying the little complicated. But yeah, I know there's there's many ways to read these books, I guess, and it'll be interesting to see what they do. I do expect, now that you mentioned I do expect them to be like just completely separate adventures with like an expected level range. That's so very similar to the way that the yawning portal of structured and I think it allows you to have that continuity if you want it to write, if you're just going from one to sixteen in order of the adventures with the same characters, or if you want to introduce these adventures at different times. But I guess I kind of talks into you're still like near our parties aren't running level sixteen short stories either, or level ten and above. So I wonder how many of these are early level adventures? Yeah, yeah, because if they are all like the early level adventures, it would be harder to can have that continuity, I think, right where it's the same party all across the board. Well, also, like you'd only have maybe like one or two level sixteen campaigns on because, yeah, experience was, yeah, I don't know, like the yeah, I mean it's hard enough to write levels like sixteen adventures anyway. So I doubt that they'll have a lot of level sixteen stuff in there because it's so difficult and the higher the levels are, the longer I can't a campaign will take, regardless of whether it's supposed to be a one shot or not, I think anyway. Or options. Yeah, players all like they have so many different options. They have like ways of getting around different things, so, so much differently than a lot of writers can imagine. Or they're because the players have so many different abilities that make them, you know, almost DM like sometimes in there in the way that they can go about doing things, they start to control the world almost at that point. So I wonder how they I wonder how they if, if it's something that they account for and how, if, if they do, yeah,...

...do that. I am gustarted to kind of read something like that just to see what that high adventure thing looks like. Well, I'm wondering just because, like, if you're if you're having this adventure happen, you know, in a oneshot environment, right, then you can obviously gear your characters accordingly. But if you're bringing in level sixteen characters that already have existing magical items, yeah, Yep, exactly. It's a I usually just depends on the tone of the book, right. I mean if they're directing it towards just a oneshoty type adventure, than they probably don't care about that at all. Yeah, these are mysteries to so, like I doubt that combat or, like you know, the combat type abilities are going to come into play here as like a major part of it. So I think it'll be more suited for like a roleplay type experience anyway. So maybe that's how they're kind of getting around it. I don't know, but we'll see, I guess. But anyways, I'm excited to see and read about some of these story backgrounds. It looks like they've they've used almost seventeen different writers. There's a lot of drafferent writers on this. Yeah, deventeen different writers for Seventeen Adventures. Yep, interesting, Yep, I won't lease. I want less all these names here, but you guys. Chris Perkins? Okay, yeah, it's the first one. There's a couple of them got us. I'm Amy Morple. Can't tell that Adam or something. I recognize her if it's just a geneer. They are, though, over on DD beyond, they have started doing not not walkthroughs per se, but like small teasers into some of them. So I know it sounds like the styles are kind of all over the place as well. So a me rpal is supposed to be kind of like off the walls bizarre. I can't remember the exact context for it, but it's supposed to be like a very, very strange, almost surrealist comedy type adventure versus. Some of them are going to be more intrigue themes, some of them are going to be more horror themed, right, also, then there could be entirely combat themed adventures. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, interesting. I guess I'll have to wait till the end of the month of figure. Yeah, exactly truly what's happening here, but I think from the from the looks of it, this is the be a good buy for almost any DM I mean, if you're looking for extraw adventures, this might just be the ticket, especially if you're starting to play the game. Yeah, might be one of their better sellers. I want that. I want that alternate cover. My God, it's yeah, it looks. It looks very it looks very like Derrington press. Yeah, it does. It's so pretty. It was. Okay, that's all. It's all the notice from the outside world that I got. All right then, so you saying it's time to start defining some some of the DMG. You know, that's what I'm saying. All right then. So everyone, we are going to jump into the dungeon master's guide. We've been reading through it, if you've been paying attention, we are. Now we're going to talk about creating encounters. So this is going to be a medi subject, so try to stick with me and hopefully we can gain some tips and things that we can use for our games. All right, so creating encounters. Encounters are the individual scenes in the larger story of your adventure, first and foremost, and encounter should...

...be fun for the players. Second, it shouldn't be a burden for you to run beyond that. A well crafted encounter usually has a straightforward objective as well as some connection to the overarching story of your campaign, building on the encounters that precede it, while foreshadowing and counters that are yet to come. So an encounter has one of three possible outcomes. The characters succeed, the characters partly succeed or the characters fail. The encounter needs to account for all three possibilities and the outcome needs to have consequences so that the players feel like their successes and failures matter. So when you guys are building your encounters and stuff like that, is that something that you've kept in mind? I've never even really thought about like the partly succeed if I'm being honest. When I do like encounter building, I've always thought, okay, either they'll succeed here or they'll run away or they'll die or something like that. But usually it's success or failure. So I'm not really sure what partly succeed would look like. I mean the runaway. That would feel they succeed, they escape with their lives in an impossible encounter. That's pretty good. Or and like hey, Sab all these through, that is success. Or like what about save the villagers from the nasty killer? And right, you can't, but you get the nasty killer, you know. I guess so I would. Yeah, HMM, interesting. What if you're in encounter where you have to defeat a bad guy and save some of the villagers that he has kidnapped, but you show up and defeat the bad gavity's already killed the villagers because you took too long, because I guess I'm more direct. A more direct way to phrases would be like what kind of care? What kind of quests are you giving your players that have a component that could void the quest right. So in the sense, I don't know, like because for the most part, like in my campaigns, it's just been Oh, you guys kind of killed the the next trouble that you've sort of encountered. But it child's been really weird because Chiltz got like these separate little things everywhere and they don't really interact with one another because no one cares to go into the jungle. So it's like you hit these little spots, you defeat the baddies there and then you move on to the next spot and look and it rarely ever connects right, right, whereas in a quest line could be like well, if you don't say the villagers, then the army for some reason, or the army later in the campaign, you know, for some reason doesn't have as many forces and it influences later events. Right. I haven't had that, I haven't been able to have that in my campaigns yet. So I guess like for me it's been only passed, since I like pass and fail for the Christ as well. Yeah, which I think is the normal, almost normal. But there are you right, there are certain situations where partly succeed might come into play. I just hadn't really thought about it as a partly succeed I guess so, but it's like we didn't die. It's always a success. Yeah, exactly for you. So all right, so let's let's talk about some of the objectives here that you can have for encounters. So character objectives. When players don't know what they're supposed to do in a given encounter, anticipation and excitement can quickly turn to boredom and frustration. A transparent objective alleviates the risk of losing player interest. For example, if the overall story of your adventure involves a quest to deliver a crisis relic to a room remote monastery, each encounter along the way is an opportunity to introduce a smaller objective that moves the quest forward. Encounters during the trip might see the adventures accosted by enemies determined to steal the relic or by monsters that are cotton constantly threatening the...

...monastery. So some players create their own objectives, which is to be expected and encouraged. It is, after all, as much the players campaign as yours. For example, a character might try to bribe enemies rather than fight them, or chase after a fleeing enemy to see where it goes. Players who ignore objectives will have to deal with the consequences, which is another important facet of encounter design. So let's say the players decide to chase after a fleeing a fleeing enemy. How is that like? I've had this in a campaign before, where the enemies try to flee, and I hadn't really thought that the players would chase after it. But they they did to a certain extent, and I was like, Oh, I don't know where this person would like this. I know kind of where they're going, but I hadn't really like thought about that as being like a possibility that they would really try to do. What about you guys? Do you have that kind of issue where you haven't thought about like what the possible character objectives would be like, what they might think? I mean most of the time it's like, okay, they defeated the enemy or they're fleeing, so now they're going to continue on with their quest. But my players almost turn around and was like, Nope, there's this guy that's fleeing, let's go get a make sure he doesn't come back later, something like that. That is me sessions that I've ever run. Gotta have it. I kind of I tried not to dwell too long in the what are all of the possible things that my players could do, because it you can't keep up. Like I'd rather focus on like, how can you increase the possibility of events happening? Right? That's a more in my head. That's like a more robust way of designing the game, because otherwise it's just going to be like chaos. Yeah, yeah, there's no way to prepare for throwing dinosaurs to fight at your party and then, halfway through the fight to the party, deciding that they're going to stop fighting and tame the dinosaurs. That does not that's not something that goes through your head when you're designing a fight. The biggest thing for stuff like that is to just have have a good knowledge of what you think your how you think your world would react to that kind of a situation. If you kind of plan a fully fleshed out and pc or villain or character that they're interacting with, even if you don't script everything that they're doing, if you have a good idea of roughly what they are and what they stand for, then you should be able to kind of spin off from there and kind of Improv yourself into the situation. Right. Yeah, it's just it's it's a worry for me, I guess, like if, especially if I'm starting a session off with like, okay, last time we left off, you guys were about to face off against this encounter and then they go into the encounter, it gets finished real quickly and they start to, you know, do something that deviates from what I thought they would originally do. Then I start to go, okay, well, I'm moving into Improv here, and the stuff that I had planned I just kind of like have to like move around in my head. I'm like, oh no, this is going to get a lot more complicated real fast, and so I just I always feel like I'm somehow letting the players down, but maybe that's just me being too, too much of a perfectionist. So I mean, I guess on that note, like I've never really found the difference in my game between like a prep aspect and like an Improv aspect, because almost always all introduce a scene and immediately it is like you guys will interact with it in a completely different manner than the past. Right, like sometimes you guys just start touching things all the...

...time. Right. Sometimes you are extremely apprehensive about doors. For some reason, doors are scary many ever him that doors it's just too much. So, like, I don't know, I guess, like to what you said, it's a little weird that you flip between like you you go between like, Oh, this is a planned moment, to Oh, this is Improv when I like, I guess that when I see the game, it's like it's mostly all Improv with some general structure. Right, it's like you Improv Yourself, you Improv in a maze, but like the maze doesn't change. I guess. Yeah, I mean, like to me it's like, I guess it's just if there's like a third if the maze had a hole in it kind of thing. That's that's sometimes how the magic names right, right, that's right. That's where magical items and that's where magic comes into the game. HMM, it's like there's a hole in amazing. My players have just gone through it and they've exited outside of the maze and so now I'm like, okay, they're outside of this structure that I had for them that had multiple different pathways that they could take, but they found another one. So now I'm like in the Improv Zone. So I'm like, okay, my men maize starts to like build outward from there to try and like encompass them again and bring them back into some sort of as semblance of story, I guess right. So I don't know. That's that's me. It's weird. I know I should I'm obay with it. Roll what I would sugect but yeah, what I would space is that maybe, like yeah, I would sug just maybe than just like accounting for that, right, like if you have like if like you're you're if those moments for you're like okay, like, I've prep this one particular dungeon right, like kind of prep a case for what if they are not in this dungeon? That's yes, yeah, I mean I do. I honestly I have like multiple different contingency plans, like in case, and I'm try to plan a few sessions like in advance with like encounters and stuff like that, because I have had it where a party decides they've, you know, been through half the dungeon and another going to exit and I was like, okay, well, I had this thing planned for them. For once. They exited this thing and it's not like maybe it wasn't fully fleshed out yet, but it's there and I have this idea, rough idea, of where they're going to go and or maybe it's like, okay, this is it. Just I try to plan a few sessions in a head ahead with multiple different threads that they can pull on that all lead towards some sort of a story or multiple different story lines that are going on at the same time, but it becomes a lot of a lot of prep work, and so I'm trying to like figure out a way to, I guess, combine that into one and make it more simple for me. But we'll see. Maybe, maybe this dungeon master's guide will help with that. Let's continue on here, because I felt like we have gone on a larger tangent. They're sorry, the only the Dundon masters God helps us, but at the rate that we're reading it, I know right for it's in ten years exactly. So okay, sample objectives. So the following objectives can be used as foundations for encounters. Although these objectives focused on a single encounter during an adventure, using the same objective in multiple encounters allows these encounters into a larger obstacle or problem that the adventures must overcome. So the sample objectives that they give are make peace, protect an MPC or object, retrieve an object, run a gauntlet, sneak in, stop a ritual or take out a single target. So, for makepeace, obviously you're trying to get the too two groups or their leaders to end a conflict that's embroiling as a complication that they suggest. The characters might have enemies on one or both...

...of the opposing sides, or some of the group or individuals might be instigating the conflict to further their own ends. For protecting NPCs are objects, obviously there will be some sort of you're acting as bodyguards here or escorts. And then, for complications, they've got things like you might the party might be the NPC might be cursed or diseased or prone to panic attacks, or too young or old to fight or apt to risk the lives of the adventures through dubious decisions. The objects the adventures have sworn to protect might be sentient or cursed or difficult to transport. All of these things are actually very good base ideas for an encounter. I guess let's say, some of these things like an escorting question of video game. Yeah, you know how frustrating it gets with the NPC's just completely useless and you basically just have to throw yourself on them to keep them from dying and walking into death in every single circumstance. Don't do that. What? Don't do what? I thought players love that run, that kind of protection encounter. Don't give your MPC something, give your a fun part is that they can do. The fun part is you make one of the success criteria for that quest the wellbeing of the MPC. Yeah, exactly, exactly. Oh, please, you must take my son to the school. And water deep. No, yeah, every time he finds a river he tries to drown himself or something every time. But yeah, curse, it's encasings. Okay, it's a curse. Narcissism. D D. Let's take my son, narcissist to the school. Ya, Haha, nice, this is stare at the water, all right. Yeah, retrieve an object is another one here. So the adventures was gain possession of a specific object in the area of the encounter, preferably before combat finished. His as a complication, enemies might desire the object as much as the adventures do, forcing both parties to fight for it. Fairly Standard. Easy enough. For complications. I probably throw in some sort of environmental effects that would make it difficult to collect this object. Throwing an object effect the object does something that you don't want it to do. Yeah, Yep, that to curses. Pretty easy to do. Run A gauntlet. So the adventures must pass through a dangerous area. The objective is similar to retrieving an object in so far as reaching the exit is a higher priority than killing opponents in the area. A time limit adds a complication, as does a decision point that might lead characters a straight other complications might include traps, hazards, are monsters. These are always fun. I always like this is almost like after you've retrieved the object, now you got to get out of this building that's falling apart. It's in Indiana Jones scene with the boulder chasing him, you know kind of thing. Yeah, that's the great, great opportunity to orn skille checks to for escaping a yeah, exactly. Saving that stops a bunch of like, yes, skill challenges along the way that like add towards their success or failure as they move forward. Could end and to TPK. Those will be careful. People don't use still challenges enough, though honestly needs to. The Suns of a thing. They're a really good way to expedite story, like if you if you've gone to the end of the dragons layer and you've destroyed the Dragon. Like okay, players, we either tp out or, you know, have like a fun little you might time moment. Who you...

...know? Yeah, like that exactly. It is pretty cool. I like it. I'm definitely gonna run a few of those, I think, in my campaign, because those they're always fun. I think players really enjoy them too, because it gives them a sense of like something bad by happen. We have to move fast. What is that like? Indiana Jones moment, it's like think fast. Exactly. What can I do on my fever right now to escape this? Yes, it is cool. So, all right. Next thing here sneak in. So the adventures need to move through an encounter area without making their enemies aware of their pre presence. Complications might ensue if they are detected. So intrigue related more it. I always find I the sneaking in as a is difficult to run. I don't know about you guys, because line of sight becomes a thing, how to sneak work. It becomes complicated that way, but it can be really cool if you do have those assassin type characters. It's also interesting. I would throw in different complications for like if people find bodies and things like that. I I'd love to like kind of come up with a system for that. I'll have to think about that more. It's scare room stuff, the guttery. The guards know you're there, but even if they can see you, they don't know you're there. Yeah, exactly. I'm sure it's nothing. Must have been the wind. I was listening to a podcast on is like a red dead redemption developer talking, and she was saying how they were having issues with some of the the behaviors in the game with regardss like npcas and quest givers. They are finding like a lot of players would go up to quest givers and the quest givers would like immediately be aggressive towards the mpcs. Well, apparently it was because the the the characters react on like an AI engine, right, and they ai engine pulls from like the threat of of the area around them. So the same sense, like in star rim. If the if the guards are fighting the player, they're not going to talk to you. All right, but what was happening is that they had rattlesnakes spawning in bushes. That generated a lot of threat, which was causing a random quest givers to be super uppriensive towards players. That's funny. No, and the difficulty in trouble shooting was that they didn't know where somethings rattlesnakes spond or not, because they weren't being bushes. It's awesome to consider. Yes, do your MP Season Game Pick? Understand level? Yeah, all right. Stopping a ritual is another sample objective here. So the plots of the evil cult leaders and malevolent warlocks and powerful fiends often involved rituals that must be foiled. Characters engaged in stopping a ritual must typically fight their way through evil minions before attempting to disrupt their rituals. Powerful magic as a complication, the ritual might be closed, might be close to completion when the characters arrived. Imposing a time limit, depending on the ritual it's completion might have immediate consequences as well. Always Fun to have a time limit type battle or a time limit type thing where you got to steal something or whatever. I find time limits do put a lot of the pressure on the players and they understand that there will be consequences or that kind of thing. M Yeah, I'd before throwing in like a stop a ritual type thing, I might throw in like the retreet of objects kind of things and see if the players succeed in taking objects that are needed for the rituals and things like that, because I'm not maybe maybe the yeah, I guess the colts could be like sneaky enough that they can start the ritual without the players, but I've always been kind of like, oh,...

...the players just happened to walk in at the exact time that they're performing a ritual, unless it's like a weeklong adventure and then throwing in a time when it just feels like all right, you know, they just happen to come at the very end, it feels. It feels very like cliche movie type thing, I guess, where it's like Yep, the players show up right at the very end, last possible minute and save the day kind of thing, which can be fun, but I've always found it more cliche. So I'd like to find a different way of doing kind of a nasty dm if you're like a player showed up but the master plan is already in ration. We did you lose? I mean I mean the entire if you want to like really stretch it, about the entire tyranny of dragons campaign from wizards is just a stop ritual campaign. Yeah, with a bunch of other stuff along the way. That's you're trying to stop the ritual before the ritual even starts. Yes, yeah, so see, I'd if I were to do a stop for a ritual type thing, I'd have it as like a long form thing where it's like, okay, this ritual is going to happen in one month, guaranteed. The players have that amount of time to be able to figure out what's going on and then show up and stop them before then. Kind of thing. But it doesn't give you that same feeling of Oh, there's a time limit before bad things happen, you know. So I just it's hard to get that balance of adding that time limit in and also not just being total cliche. They show up, of course, right before so I don't know, it's different. I'd maybe I'll run both. Try and run both of them, see what feels better and then work from there and knows, an interesting way. A calendar is like such a balancing thing for a game and I think it's so necessary just because that way you, the DM, can keep track of when things are happening right and like the thing is like. Obviously, as a DM you get to be really wishy washy with how long certain things take, but at least you get to time everything. Yes, it's a make sense. HMM, an interesting way kind of around the Cliche, I find, but still keeping in line with the CLICHE, is to make it so that the ritual can't even happen until the players get there. So make it like there's something that the players have that, Yep, is needed by the cult or they like the players themselves are essentially going to be the sacrifice for this. Yet so like that, I read from movie cliche to Anime Cliche. Well, Iran am, I read a one shot at one point where players are investigating this sunken city and they essentially their guide went missing, and so they're searching on the city trying to find them, and then they find the guide and he's like on a sacrificial table about to be a sacrifice. So it turns into a stop ritual, but they didn't even know it was a stop ritual campaign. It Times into that at the very end because they had essentially delivered what they needed, which was a sacrifice. Right. Yes, I yeah, I would love to do yeah, that does sound better. And I throw it in with like a retrieve an object type quest before then, where it's like, if the adventure succeed in taking this item, then the cults is going to try and find a way to trick the players into finding them and coming with the object that they need. So I that that would be that would be good. All right. Last one here. Take out a single target. So the villain is surrounded by minions powerful enough to kill the adventures. The characters can flee and hope to confront the villain another day, or they can try to fight their way through the minions and take out their target. As a complication,...

...the minions might be the innocent creatures under the villains control. Killing the viney the villain means breaking that control, but the adventures must endure the minions attacks until they do. This feels like a mind flayer type campaign where you know, there's my mind flayer trying to take over the world and or having a bunch of just random NPC's and people, maybe NPC's that are important to the characters being under the influence of the villain here. And so if they kill these NPC's or people, then you know they're doing a bad thing. But also if they kill the villain, then they stop more bad things from happening in the future. So do the ends justify the means? That would knows. It's really it's really any any powerful individual would make a good single target kill campaign. Corrupt King, Mafia boss, even a dragon. If you can find a sick, sufficiently powerful dragon, it's attracted a lot of people to its side. Yes, vampire vampires a good one for this. Oh yeah, with all their thralls and things like that. Secondly, throw up things that are not necessarily of their right mind to say that they're village exactly. HMM. All right, so those are the objectives that they give as options. I think I have kind of run out of time here, which is unfortunate. I really wanted to move into the combat and counter stuff, but it's a big enough section that I think I'll hold off onto it on it until next time. Yeah, we can probably do the whole style Chot next time. Yeah, all right, so I will let Brit and take over from here. So what do you got for us? Well, first of all, I've got our sponsorship, quote unquote sponsorship, because we don't get paid for this. But this episode of triple advantage is brought to you by the wasting disease, one of the newest modules from the Royal City Society, featuring a full three shot, as we like to call them around here, much to Carlos is Chagrin, multiple factions that you can align with a thrilling story about disease set in the city of water, deep topical. It is available right now on DM's guilt. I think it's one dollar ish for the module, the first one that we've ever released for a fixed amount. And also, hopefully, we will have some new stuff for you soon. We're are hard it work behind the scenes cooking up some new stuff from the real city society for you, so look for that soon. Not next week, soon, I don't think, but soon enough. But for now it's time to move into talk of the town, which is the segment where we ask you, the society, a question, and that we answer that question and talk about your answers to that question in this segment right now, right here in the question of the week is, as a DM, do you have any third party supplements that you use to enhance the experience of your campaign? So something that is not necessarily tied to the campaign that you are running, if you're running a prewritten campaign, or something that you've got from a source like DM's guild or someone like us, that you use to change up your change up your home rules and change up what the players can do. Interesting curiosity. Would alcohol technically fall under this category? Nope, nice, rather so. I mean I use homebrew rules. I mean I think most people do. I've taken a few from Matt. I've taken a few from Matt Mercer's videos that I've watched in the past. I've taken a few...

...from other videos that I've seen as well, just to like add some player to the game, but nothing like that I've written down as like, Oh, this is for sure like a source material type thing. Other than I will say Madam Mensel's, I love using that stuff because it's a really cool thing which you created, Braden, and I'm really impressed with it. It's it adds a whole new flavor to rogues and to darker, sneakier type characters that I love seeing in in the game. So I have included that. My players have not yet interacted with it because they're not those type of players, but I will eventually introduce them to characters that might have that kind of stuff. So I'm excited to bring that out. Yeah, shut up, that a mentals. I've actually included that one in both of my campaigns that I'm running right now and it is I just I like we talked last week about how much I like shopping, so any chance I get to yeah, new shops and now an adventures really nice for me. Yeah, I said that. I've I've really enjoyed using character generators, especially the ones I give you a little bit of like character backgrounds and like some personality traits, because it really gives you a quick way to like jump into an RP of some new person if you have more information on them. So, like there's some really good ones online. Use that for INPCAS them. Yeah, especially like when when in cities and players get to interact with a lot of different people. Yeah, those always come in clutch. It is so hard to just like randomly generate those kind of characters, right. Yeah, well, like I mean and feel like they are supposed to be part of the world. Yeah, I think we're out spending hours and hours on beforehand, like figuring out every person's, you know, individual personalities and stuff. I do, I do agree and I think that it's a really, really useful tool, one that I should probably use myself, because I'm often cut with my pants down whenever somebody wants to talk to a new MPC. But at the same time, I don't feel like every single NPC that's encountered in any given scenario needs to be this really quirky, memorable person, you know, like a lot of them can just cuss be like their own person but still kind of generic. That's always dependent on how much your players interact with them. Yeah, because there I've definitely had moments where I'm like this is a nobody in this world and all of a sudden the players are like talking, like trying to find out the deepest sarcod secrets. So if that's already there with a character generator, yeah, easy enough. Well, I know, like, for example, when your party went shopping in my tier name of dragons campaign. Carlos, the last time you were in water deep, I was like I had fenric picked out this guy that deals in kind of like crafting weapons and stuff out of exotic creatures like dragons and deals in the buying of their slain parts, because I knew that you would be doing that, and I had Daub, the magic good salesman, crafted out because I knew that you guys were looking for some specific magic items. So because of that, I knew that those two interactions would be decently lengthy. So I wanted to put some more time into those particular and PC's versus. If you needed arrows and you just kind of thought of that on the flight, you're probably just going to come up against a room of the mill kindly Arrow salesman right, not going to buy some guy with some intricate backstory that I put a lot of time into. Okay, but what about like, for instance, the Blacksmith and port cane in your campaign? There, because we use we we stayed in port cane for quite some time. We use the blacksmith fairly often and the character became a bit of a patron of ours for a short period of time at our at the bar establishment, that we ended up buying there as...

...well. So well, that's that's again wiring. That's again like I put a lot of work into pretty much all of the NPCAS in port can, because I knew you guys were going to stand upwards of like fifteen sessions at least in this right town. So I was like, yeah, I want to have these experiences that you guys can delve into and figure out for yourselves. Yeah, so the like you said, like a getting arrows and stuff like that isn't a big deal until you, know, you start using the same NPC to buy arrows from all the time, right, which in a city like water deep, you probably won't. You'll probably just try and find who whatever's closest versus if you're looking for a magic item supplier. Right, somebody has deals in buying dragon parts. That's a bit pretty niche thing to the point where I can pretty much pinpoint. There's like two of these people that you know of. Yeah, yeah, I like that. Sorry, we got way sidetrack from that, but I like the I like the I like the idea of Carlos. I think that's a really good good tool for a DM. What did the people say? Let me get to mind for slow your role cant yeah, come on, because I've got it. I've got a Gota, gotta Gota. Got A shout out Hammond's harvesters handbook, which is pretty much I think it was like ten when I bought it. It might have been less. I don't want to say that they're charging something that they're not. I bought it at full price at the time and I don't regret a single scent of that purchase because it's the most fun that I've ever had using a third party mudule in my campaign. So what it is is essentially it's a book that has a list of every monster in the player's handbook, and the author behind this is also reased a volume two in a volume three that includes monsters from Volos and morning kinds respectively. And what it is is essentially the idea that, you know, monsters don't usually have like loot on them, like you can't really pick their pockets, but they themselves are loot to some people. There are people that will pay top dollar for dragon skills. There are people that will pay tons of money for vampire's teeth, so it includes a list of pretty much everything they can be harvested from a special civic creature and he's got like every creature in this thing. It includes the DC that you would have to roll in order to dissect these things. So if you roll like a ten, maybe we're only getting like a couple of dragon teeth on a dragon. But if you roll a fifty, now you got some teeth and some scales keep going up. Maybe you getting yourself some wings or a horn. Cool, and it also includes a laundry list of home brewed items that can be crafted out of all of these different things that have been collected. So I know in my tyranny of dragons campaign, the players have outfit of themselves as like dragon slayers because that's what they've been doing for a while. They've been dragged down and killing dragons as they cause trouble, and now they've they've they've harvested a couple of these and they brought the gear back and now they're like kidded out like as dragon slayers because they've got all this stuff made out of slain dragons. So it's super interested in so much very shout out to shout out to Hammonds for pimping our party out. Yeah, yeah, it's been it's been so much fun. We've got like one of I think our druid right now has a cloak that she can like speak a command word and then she just gets wings for eight hours because it was crafted from dragon wing leather. It's pretty sage. It's I recommend this module to literally everybody. Yeah, I mean like that would have been a lot of work too for the guy to Oh, it's a lotte, it's a Ludic Chris amount of work. There's so much work that's been put into this particular model. Makes it so much easier on the DM because I honestly it is something that the players will do all the time. You'll...

...be like, Oh, what can I harvest from this monster? DM He question mark. How much is that worth? I don't know about that. Yeah, there's an there's a price point and everything for every item as well, which is beautiful. I yeah, I'm using that heavily in my Tiany of dragons. I intend I'm already homebrewing a new campaign at the moment for when my other campaign is over, and I intend to introduce that in session zero as an option and hope that they're a little bit selective about it, but probably not. We'll see. But speaking of will see, let's see what the society had to say and I got to say our discords been popping recently. If you are, if you are not on our community discord and you are listening, join our community discord because we've had, we've been having some great conversations over there about a lot of stuff, and this particular one I've got a couple of answers from here about these third party supplements that people use. Are Good. Buddy he gipps says that he uses the critical hit tables from dark heresy. So dark heresy, I looked up, is a TT RPG that's set in the war hammer forty cavers. These tables are very much something that you are clearly borne out of the war himm Er forty cavers, because essentially what you would do is every time you crit in addition to doing the double damage, you do some kind of a terrible effect to this person. So you would roll I'm not entirely sure if it's a d one hundred or if it's it looks like it's a d twenty, but depending on the type of damage that you're doing, you roll on this critical table to determine what extra happens to the person that you're hitting. So there's one for like piercing, slashing, bludgeoning. He's he's homebrewed this a little bit because it was kind of a sci fi setting previously and he's kind of adapted it towards the DD verse. But one of the ones that he introduces, like if you do like heat or fire damage, he is posted a little a little snippet of the specific thing and the if you roll a seven on this critical hit table, with a terrible snapping sound, the heat of the attack boils the marrow in the targets arm, causing it to shatter. The targets arm is broken and until it is repaired, the target counts as having only one arm there stunned for one around and also take one d five levels of fatigue, which I believe is a yeah, k like exhausted. I don't know if it's a onetone translation. I'd be interested to see, however, or if he just remove the fatigue and maybe it's just the arm exploding, which is horrific enough to be honest. Yeah, yeah, that kind of tough is always interesting to throw in because it just adds like another level of like realism, but also like, you know, it's got to be something that the players can overcome at the same time and you don't want to completely debilitate them either. Ye, it's a hard like balance to come up with. And then he went on to say that there's a bunch of tables that are from dark heresy and I don't think he uses all of them, but he's talking about how, you know, there's rolling to see how hard blood splatters when you when you strike a critic hit. There's rolling to see how far the head travels when you decapitate someone. Oh my gosh, so specific. Yeah, but the other good answer that I want to talk about is from our good buddy hext shadowed text, who is a huge fan of wild magic and wild magic sorcerers, and I missread this. I thought that he had found a onezero results table for wild magic search and I was like man, that's a lot of that's a lot of wild magic. Now it is...

...a tenzero result table for wild magic search. What so you would roll a D Tenzero, which I assume only exists in the virtual world. I don't think there is a physically constructed dtenzero anywhere out there, but he wanted to explain that with the wild magic he is altered it a little bit from the the Vanilla Wild magic that you would find on the player's hand book. We're essentially, instead of like every time you what you Carlos, you've run a wild county sorcer, is it to like on a Gnat one or not twenty or something, it causes a surge and the thing is that it doesn't happen that often. So well, he's like he's altered it here so that it may trigger on any spell cast and you essentially you have to make a DC ten plus spell level check using your spell casting modifier. If you get above that check, you're good. If you do not meet that check, then your wild magic surges and you have to roll a D Tenzero, which again is a thin I play. I played a campaign and I stole from and I still a home rule from somebody, but essentially having it so that every time the source for cast is spell, the wild magic table triggers on a twenty. The first time you were you roll a die after you cast a spell. Then the next time it triggers on nineteen and above, then eighteen and above, so it kind of like forces the wild magic to occur at some point, resetting back to twenty. Yeah, and that was really fun to do because at least like the wild magic sorcer gets to at least hit wild magic. Well, my predictably the the Oh well, semi, I mean the other way you do it is use the tides of chaos ability that the sorcerer has right, which is first level ability, gains you advantage on an attack roll or saving throw, our ability to check, and then you can only do that once for long rest. And then automatically the DM can have the wild marge magic searge table happen anytime after that when you cast a spell a first level. And then you get to regain the use of the tides of chaos feature if the wild magic surge goes off. So all theme a little bit like in the sense that you can choose when it occurs. It's no longer wild. The DM gets it, gets to choose and he can have you do it right. So you gain advantage. And then there's like the DM can decide, okay, yes, this time the wild magic searge table happens. I was kind of like that takes the randomness out of it. I feel like that with the with the roll of the dice, like there's a literal chance in the fact that it's wild and it's unpredictable. It's not DM just saying hey, this happens to you now. I mean the wild and unpredictable part would be which effect you get, because it might just completely, you know, screw up the spell you just cast or gained advantage on or whatever. And that's the other thing is it can happen on ability checks and saving throws now to oh well, no, I guess you still have to cast a spell after that. So it's after you cast a spell, but you can use the advantage for anything you want. Right. So, I don't know, it's interesting, but my favorite ruling. But I could see the appeal person yeah, I mean definitely lets you drive the story element like further, right, like oh now you're wild magic trigger, isn't it could possibly save the party in a situation or some scenario like that. Right. Yeah. So, so hex linked us this table on our discord. He linked the most up to date version and he was very impressed with the fact that this new version lets you now control f which implies that the last one did not let you search, which meant you just had to...

...scroll through tenzero entries to find the one that you rule know, which is no upsetting. So I took it. I took a quickly through at the two that I really enjoyed was I can't remember the numbers of them, but one of them was a castor grows one additional finger each week and castor now enjoys the taste of fire. I just like that. I just looked at a round one. It says any attempt to change the shape will turn the castor into a shrubbery Nice. So, with with this in mind, our lovely admin for our discord through in a robot for us to play around, which which is something that we should have done a while ago but is now dumb. So anybody can just roll on this. So hex rolled and got a entry nine thousand and ninety six, which you copied over for one d ten rounds all would within fifty feet. Is Water Soluble, but you then pointed out would suck if you were on a boat. So there's some there's some interesting entries in here. That's that's such an odd thing. I love it. That's so funny to think about. I want to know how this person decided this. Like tenzero. That's a lot of stuff right now. Hear me out, guys. What if would just melts all right. So that concludes our segment and thereby our podcast for today. And if you like what you here, be sure to check us out and give us a follow. Honor socials. That's at roal city social on twitter at row city society on Instagram. The links to our community discord are found on both. Check out our stuff on DM skilled if you've got the time. I think you'll like what you find and, besides that, keep it locked for new episodes of triple advantage, hopefully every week. We'll see you next up.

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