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Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 2, Episode 22 · 2 years ago

Ep. 28 - End Of An Era

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In our last episode of season 2, we discuss pacing in one-shots and long-form campaigns, look at the Plane of Air, and discuss whether when to break character as a DM.

Hello everybody, beautiful audience listeners of the Royal City societies podcast, triple advantage. We are on episode twenty eight for all of you, and stay guys. We come back with the established and strong structure of this podcast, which is general discussion followed by dividing the DMG, followed by critical thought. German, you're going to rock our world. Maybe we'll have to see, won't we actually stick around till the end of the episode to find out what is jiggling in his mind? But for now, guys, I actually just ran this session. It's the freshest that we're ever going to get this kind of podcast feature at. But I just finished running a brand new three shot, as I'm now getting used to calling and I think it ran great smallest party, sighs, I've ever ran with, by the way, only three people, which was interesting because combat felt so fun. I was able to run individual initiative on creatures instead of lumping creature types together as I normally do, which kind of gave an interesting dynamic when I, you know, had two bandits to go and grapple one of my PC's with, rather than like, Oh, what do I do with the horde? And I wanted to get your thoughts on a couple of the little implementations that I had just to make it a fun little one shot. So the biggest, I think, mechanic behind is is that I took one of the encounters that they posted on dd beyond for Iceland Mail, which involves the players going around and collecting parcels to deliver up in icepire peak. So what I did was I essentially made it to that the first portion of the session. The first encounter per se was a very RP, heavy social encounter in which the players, sort of unbeknown to them, get to choose three of ten possible packages to deliver, which affects the route that they'll take to accomplish their main quest. It was really fun designing the world behind this and immediately disappointing seeing seven other options that I know the players won't see anymore. But I wanted to get your guyss take on this. I know we talked about a lot of improvisation and how we generally like to keep ourselves organized to keep the flow of the story going, but is there any similarities to other campaigns and maybe some tips that you guys might have with how I could run this going forward. I mean in my head it seems pretty rudimentary, but I can't, you know, still say no if the players want to choose a different direction or a different path than I've sort of prescribed initially. HMM, it's a tough one, for sure. I would have to say like the biggest part is is keeping your players interested in doing it. So if so, for instance, in my last session I literally had one of my characters, one of the NPC's, throw a disease bottle at the group and three out of the five characters now have this disease which can only be cured in a specific place. So now they're kind of driven to that specific place because they got this thing. That happened. It couldn't it might not have worked out, but it did. It was awesome twist. My players all loved it because they're like it came out of nowhere and now we're kind of like rushed to try and do this thing...

...and they really care about that, like accomplishing that feat, that that task that I've kind of set up for them. So for the parcels, you know, it would be awesome if you could find a reason for them to care about those parcels or care about the person that they're delivering it to or something along those lines. That gives them like a good solid, like emotional like reason to pursue that path, because if they don't, then you're right, they could. They could go anywhere and they still can, even if they have that emotional attachment. But when they have that like drive for them, it's much more like it's much easier to just kind of predict where they're going to go and it makes the prep work a lot easier, at least from what I've found. And before that even happened in my campaign, I had opened up the world and and they had opportunity to kind of like get away from this whole thing if they want to do. They could have avoided the whole encounter that would have caused this to them, but they chose to go and get into this this fight. So you know, now they've kind of suffered the consequences of that. Yeah, so I mean that that would be my advice. Find some sort of emotional reason for them to continue forward or push forward towards whatever goal it is that you want them to push for. Yeah, it's definitely interesting because I'm starting to get really excited and really interested in these six hour type of stories. So just mechanically, it's been interest seen trying to design a mini game world right where choices are still free, but we can definitely end this in three two and a half hour sessions. It's been difficult because this is like the first time that I've really had to deal with pacing of a story, and I don't know if, like I'm sure you guys have like experienced this within your campaigns as well, but a lot of the times with home games it's easy enough to say, sure, you guys can stare at a door for an hour because of everybody's having fun here. Well then, great, yeah, it's worth it. Right, like that's happen, well spent. But on the same sense, if you're going onwards in a one shot and then all of a sudden you need to stretch it to a two shot and three shot, and how God, they keep just staring at doors like and like how, where's the limit? Right, like how do you add story beats to have them continually progress forward without it feeling like a total railroad? And it's definitely this is new to me and I've been reading a lot on like procedural, like design in general, just like how how to keep all these little paths possibly available, if dependent on choices. So kind of looks like it kind of a kind of ended up making like a progression tree, kind of like you would see and sieve or other smiliar games, which is like Oh, location encounter one unlocks like locations two and three and their respective encounters, and you go on words from there. Some things are dead ends but you know, they all somewhat weave back up to that main story thread. But I just wanted to tell you, guys, is really exciting. I think the session ran really well with only three players. Like I said, combat was super, super smooth and just in general, I think having a very arpy heavy session, one with new player, or not new players, but new players to each other,...

...a new party. Oh my God, words are Hurd sometimes just having a new party entirely. It was good to get everybody to sort of RP and everybody got on the same wavelength on how to play. And now we're going to be moving on to, you know, session two, which is the next little chapter in this adventure. But how do you guys manage that development and that sort of exposition throughout your campaigns as dms, like you guys must be excited to get to new things right. So what are some creative moments that you guys have had to like spur your players on? I don't know if you guys can remember anything specific. I'll have Braden answer this one. Sure I'm I'm going to subvert that by saying that I don't think it's necessarily necessary if in a home game, speaking from that experience specifically, just because if players are really enjoying where they're at and there's enough reason for them to be where they're at and they keep finding new things where they're at, there's really no reason to switch rapidly shift to something else. Like if they're enjoy and, like you said, if they're enjoying Saren at doors for three hours, I'm not going to tell them not to. If they're enjoying the small little town that I'm made for them, and I've already if I've got like six other towns fleshed out, each with their own little side missions in side quest to find, but they're really enjoying the town that they're in, then I'm probably going to be more inspired to keep going back and writing for that place than to just keep forcing them along into some new path. Yeah, I guess it's a fine balance between your artistic pride in a sense, and how your parent, how your players are handling you know, you can hand them in a piece of artwork, but if they hang it upside down in their home, you know, it's up to them. I guess it's a bit of a stretch to call anything that I do in the DD world art, but yeah, it's a it's not always the easiest decision, but I think the important thing, and I've talked to several DM friends of mine about this, but I think the important thing at the end of the day is that like both you and your players are having fun. So if you're, if you're just keep like forcing them into the next thing that I see in the next thing because it's something you're super excited for them to get into. That doesn't mean that they're always going to be enjoying it. No, you're right, but I think that there are creative ways that you can kind of force them into things without them feeling like they're being forced into it. I think that there are ways of adding chance to certain events that that can make you feel like, oh my goodness, I need to get this done, I need to go and do this, is I must do this, I just I just have to and I think that adds a lot to a character. Had to have that drive to do something, because I do find that sometimes within homebrew games, if, if the world is too open, you almost end up feeling like you don't know what to do anymore. And so giving the players a little bit of a nudge, a little bit of a push from either random chance or emotional store, emotional connections is is great. Like, for instance, Braden, I know I'm kind of excited for for mats campaign coming up, specifically because we'll be going back into the town where your character is so pissed off at one of the other NPC's in that town and I have a feeling that we're going to meet him again because we've made that emotional connection with that person and it might push a bit of a story that way. And so I think that it would be a perfect thing...

...for Matt to use to push some sort of a story that he might want to present for that town and and it kind of like. I think that is completely acceptable and I think that the players really enjoy that. Correct me if I'm wrong here. We'll have to see. I've got a bit of an insight into what's into what's going forward in that particular campaign. I think you'd be surprised by what's going to happen. So I mean I keep you up an into as at the end. Now, he I'm know that's the DM. So I don't know how we say here. I'm calling shenanigans. Yeah, I want to go back as you said earlier, though, Burn, you said that you would not call your anything that you do in the dnd space art. What would you call it? Well, that, first and foremost, is what we like to call selfdepreciating humor. Trust me, I I just mean that like I'd I don't look at a campaign that I've created and think to myself like this is perfection. I'm layers. Second, I love this and they better love this because I made it. It's great. I'm very and I've become a little more cognizant of this recently, but I'm very aware that, like, especially my particularly arep heavy. DM style is not for every player. So I'm like, as a as a DM, I'm trying to be significantly more cognizant about just kind of moving things forward in a direction that still gets me an enjoyment of running this game but still allows my players to find the whatever they're looking for out of it. I'll try to factor that into the next couple of sessions that I have here. I am hard capping myself. I was trying to do this three shot thing before and they ended up running into like four or five adventures or for five sessions, which wasn't the plan. So you'll try to really lock it down for this one. I think the pacing is good. To keep you guys updated as we go along, but for now I think it's that time, my crazy it's a time that times one pm because because it's that time, but that time is the time for divining the DMG. Last week we started taking a look at the inner planes. We look speci typically at what they comprised of, and those are the four elemental planes of air, earth, fire and water, Avatar, but also the elemental chaos, this kind of swirling, cataclysmic force that surrounds and binds and brings them together but also keeps them apart. Today we're going to start by taking a look at the plane of air, the plane of air. I like that. It describes the essential nature of the plane of air. Movement, animation and inspiration. Airs the breath of life, the winds of change, the fresh breeze that clears away the fog of ignorance in the stiffness of old ideas. I like that. I like that it kind of it's not just are in the very literal sense of air, it's air in the very abstract sense of what are represents as an element. I find that a little bit ironic, based just solely based on again Avatar, where the air nomads are monks who kind of hold onto judic tradition. And so when it says, you know, the stiffness of old ideas, it's just yeah, I'm blowing away the stiffness of old ideas. I'm like, how I think it's an interesting analogy to make as well because, at least for me, the like when you started describing that, I just thought of the video of Bruce Lee describing how to move like water, how water shapes and flows around. So my idea of, you...

...know, an element that's you know all the change in progression would have been water. Yeah, not, I'll have to see what a, what water does represents, once we once we get to that. But I like, I like what it says here, and this is already got me curious as to what history I don't know about these planes already, because it talks about just a it's a large open expanse filled with like different guests. Talks about there being like clouds that have been magically reinforced in order to hold full cities, but it also talks about they're being chunks of earth just kind of drifting in and a specifies that they are remnants of failed invasions by denizens of the plane of earth and, first of all, Avatar. I think that that connection is going to be present for the next like four weeks as we discuss these planes. But just the idea that these planes do occasionally overlap and that there is conflict between the different elements and the people that live within these elements is just incredibly fascinating to me. But it begins to talk about storms being increasingly frequent, air being mild, except near the plane of water, where it's freezing, and near the play and a fire, where it's boiling. HMM, only rain and snow kind of storms near the plane of water. It talks about most of the plane being a complex web of air streams, currents and winds called the labyrinth winds, which is I like the concept of it. It almost seems like there's there's definitely been some kind of side scrolling type platformers where you're like catching different guests of wind and those make you go faster, kind of thing. It reminds me of all over the place too. Yeah, if you hit the wrong one, you're not going somewhere you want to go. It's all right. It kind of reminds me of that to a certain extent. The idea that you do need to have this kind of intricate, almost GPS type knowledge of exactly when to turn off, kind of like a road map if you had like Google maps, to navigate the the plane of air, just because there's these constant currents and taking the wrong one is not going to take you to where you want to go. Let's see how the wind won yes, wind wigger here and they're among the labyrinth winds, are hidden realms reachable by only following a particular sequence of flowing winds. So this could definitely be its own setting period. Like I feel like you could just run a full campaign plane of air, full stop outside the material plane want to start Rome being the abled Aqua, which not spelled like aqua the water and apparently having nothing to do with that at all, and shining domain of silver spires, invertant gardens atop of fertile Earth Moat. And it talks about the Dukes that live there being dedicated to the law, being dedicated to goodness and being dedicated towards stopping the incoming forces of the elemental chaos as they continue to surround the plane served by Eric Ocra and a little known race known as the Vati. I don't think we've ever encountered thought tea in anything now doesn't ring a bell. I was expecting Gennacy, but I don't think that they're there. Their plane touched right or not? Feel like I've heard the name body before, but I don't remember. Actually, yeah, train them, maybe we'll see through the monster manual at one point being like Oh, these are interesting. Body, if I remember correctly, was the character in minish cat in the legend of elda. Never I don't think I...

...played it. No, and I think I think it also sounds very similar to like bawtu being yeah, yeah, right, fairly mad. Need to watch Cora again. The original plane off are nearest the great conflagration, is known as the SIROCCO streets. We're hot, dry winds are raking across large chunks of Rock and earth that are, I guess again, left over from this apparent war or attempted invasion from the plane of Earth. This is it sounds like it's a staging ground, almost like this area where they're able to cross over from the plane of earth and Mount and prepare attacks against the rest of the the plane of air, which is that would be an interesting thing for a like a reconnaissance type mission. HMM, we need you to head over to the SIROCCO Straits and see what they're cooking up, because they're all they're coming, they're waiting, they're coming. Yep, but you're right. This whole set, like this whole plane, just feels like you could run so many different low settings off of it. It really does, and I would, I would love to run like a higher level campaign than just exists on one of the one of the elemental planes, or even all of them, but like starting in one and really specifying, yes, sacking into one of them completely. But honestly, like, wouldn't it just be so weird to like, I don't know, to start trapped, like how do you even get a character like into that plane and then just be like okay, now go forth. You know nothing about the plane of air. Well, now, it would definitely be ire. In these yelling winds, there are from this profiting you everywhere and you have no idea where to go. But Luckily we have writing tools that are called and DC's you alternative. I'm GETTA. I'm going to finish this section and then I'm going to pitch this campaign. Sure, got an idea for namis is a good work. Could be fun between the Sea of fire on the plane of fire and the Sorocca Straits, a towering firestorm known as the Glat, the great conflagration. This bugs me irrationally just because this was referenced in the last paragraph and only now are they explaining it so like that. The the English student in me is feeling like somebody really screwed up the order that these paragraphs were supposed to go in, and it's driving me nuts. Sometimes known as the plane of Ash. So it's essentially where the plane of fire in the plane of air are coming together and forming, just like cinder storms, this endless storm front of like smoke and ash and just like you can't see in front of you because it's so smoke choked all the time, where outlaws and fugitives take refuge. It sounds like a literal wild west, right down to the dust, constantly blowing. Awesome, maybe awesome starting point for hey, you find yourself in a tavern in the great conflagration, it seems a great leg mad mask, Mad Max, like sitting down the ash planes. That would be really neat. You're riding around on like a rickety, like I don't know, like windsurfing, sales and shit, yes, but also, guys, what kind of outlaws and fugitives? Like a maiden in this kind of place, celestial fugitives, like, yeah, that's what we're talking about here, like this isn't like, Oh yeah, there is that bandit the other day and he accidentally ended up in the, you know, the the plane of Ash. No, he wouldn't survive. They're like took a demon that he didn't keep their under the contract. Jordan, you can finally actually play ghost rider, but...

...at the opposite end, if we're talking polar the probably literal polar opposites. It mentions the frost fell, which is apparently a plane of ice that's just on the one border of the plane of water. It's a area known as the Mistral reach where the air of the airplane meets the Ice of the frost bell and creates just blizzarding snowstorms constantly, just always just a perpetual state of ice and snow and sleet being rained down upon those that try and visit the plane. A little bit of inside here. But like the structure of these planes, when we were talking about like the material plane, feel while and shadow fell, we had the astral and the Ol plant or so ethere plane in that mixture was kind of like the highway between those plans, right, that's what we said you. So this seems like in the next ring of planes, perhapsly the the plane of air serves like a serves that purpose. I can't remember if it's in the DMG or in the players handbook, but there is a full breakdown of the spheres like how each of the kind of outer planes, inner planes, X Y Z, kind of looking overlay and interact with each other and the whole description of the ethereal plane is that is kind of like both around and under everything. It's kind of it's on a lower kind of it's moment. So you can like, yeah, you can kind of slip down into it and then pop out at a run, not a random but at a chosen other place if you know where you're going. But it's really weird. It's interesting. What I'm thinking high level campaign for players, one from one from each plane, oh boy, being being brought together as kind of like a coalition, the rare joint coalition between the planes, as enforcers of the realm, just kind of tracking down, like you said, Carlos, like like celestial outlaws, like demons on the run from the nine hells, like the is, these kind of like fugitives, and just seeing seeing what kind of shenanigans they get into. Since so, so okay. What is fun? The others water we I've watched that and I'd run that campaign, but I would be pretty awesome. Yeah, I'll let you I'll let you know. It's common. It's not. I'm lazy, but it's my man. The energy recording at alum pm feel so much different than the energy. Recording at eleven am has like I've had a cup of coffee and I'm still wipe today. It's the enthusiasm. It is, as always, basic great resonates with the audience listening this late at night. But that being said, what did you out there think about the plane of air? Have you ever run a campaign on it? Have you ever had your players track down celestial outlaws and demons in the room for the nine hell, would you watch a buddy cop show about for people from the different planes coming together to fight evil? The answer is yes to that last one. Don't at me, but do at us at Royal City Society on Instagram to let us know what you think that's. And while you're doing that, I'm going to turn it over to my good friend Jordan, who's got a little something for us. All right, so, oh, I've got a critical thought for today, guys. This one's a little bit based off of one of my sessions that I did recently. But before you start, Uh Huh, aren't you emotional? This is your last critical thought. I know I was going to talk about it after so I didn't have to get all emotional before,...

...but please, please, cry. That'll be great for ratings? Waiting? Great, yeah, that'll be great for rating. No, I'm not one of those people who would do anything for ratings. Okay, all right, any person. Yeah, bringing back on topic, no, Jordan is not going anywhere, but we are excited to announce that we will be moving on to season three of triple advantage soon. So finally some of the core changes and we hope to bring you guys much more lively, exciting and memorable podcast in the coming days. So stay tuned, subscribe and check back for a season three when that comes around. But sorry, Jordan, I aterrupted to plug to think. It's just very nice. But well, you know, like next week you guys are going to have to deal with me on the DMG, so be provared. Things it away. Oh, I'm sorry, my bad, it's a teaser, guys. All right, I will then get to the critical thoughts, you know, because I think that's what you want me to do. Now, Carlos, if I'm reading you correctly this time, I mean it was my bad. I their podcast. So okay, so critical thought of the day. When? When do you guys find it is acceptable for a DM to break out of their character? So if they're playing as an NPC, when is it acceptable for that character to do something that would they wouldn't normally do? Mine Control? Yeah, okay, that's a good example. That's right. We have magic in the world, man. Yeah, so that's like an an obvious answer. Like mine control. Yes, you can totally do that kind of thing. I mean like mind control to a certain extent. I guess that that that magic allows you to do that, like suggestion allows you to make people do a lot of things, but not everything. But have you ever found yourself in a situation where you, as the DM, kind of had to change the character on the fly to kind of suit the needs of the players, or do you always like just stick with that character and they're kind of style? Well, I think I actually definitely have done this with NPCs, where characters might suggest a course of action for that MPC, for example. They talked about them and then in their players huddle when they discuss what they're going to be doing with this NPC, you know they're part of their theories might become interwoven into that NPC's backstory or actions. Going on words, if it's interesting enough and I feel would be exciting to pursue from a story element. So, for example, like a simple NPC that the player suggested might be sending like a love letter to some far away romantic. Well, that wasn't necessarily the MPC's motive, but it seems kind of fun, so I introduced it and I think it was received well. It got a good couple of laughs and the RP space of the game, which was a success in my book, worth tainting your character for that. It was worth absolutely obliterating that characters purpose in this world initially. And I think to answer your question on the other end, which is not necessarily just what the players have discovered yet, right,...

...because it's easy to change things in the background, right HM, but more actively, if your players are already engaging with certain NPC's or characters in the game, then I normally will rely on that character's statistics to add a little bit of variability to it. So, for example, a character with high intelligence might start piecing together that the fight isn't going in their favor much earlier than it would start to actually, you know, go south for them. HMM, whereas I might, I'm less likely to do that with a creature that you know, runs primarily on instinct because they have three intelligence right, those creatures are likely not going to change their behaviors. But for the most part any humanoided in this in this game that has a say or some bearing in the direction that the players will take their story definitely will have a little bit of an insight check, a wisdom check, general intelligence, which I will try to factor into their decisionmaking. So it might actually surprise the players if it makes sense. I don't think I would ever break away truly from the motives of an MPC after like if the players have discovered it, because I think that that's part of I think would be kind of cheesy for the players, you know, get their master plan put on the board with like, you know, all their investigation strings leading down to this is, you know, like this is it, this character's true motive, for me to just pull that, pull that road out from under them. But yeah, I think definitely, definitely. I've definitely done it with just NPC's. That could have been something and they just turn out to be the next dude. It's how about you, braiden? I've got an answer that you'll hate, and then I've got possibly, if you'll allow me, after you answer a bit of a bit of a tangential question to tack on. Yeah, sure. My answer is that to a certain extent it's your NPC and the players don't have your notes or step walk right. So if you're saying it's in character, is it out of character, sinceince when you like it's it's it's a strange thought just because, I mean, it's real. If Mirror, what was it observe? Really real if our eyes are real? EA, see, Jaden. I mean that's trually works through like a new NPC, that the characters have them only just yeah, and I guess, I guess. Yeah, if they've got like a cleric friend in the town that started suddenly starts like massacring the villagers. Yeah, every and I raised it's going to yeah, it's going to raise a lot more eyebrows than like the rogue suddenly like not stealing from somebody. Hmm Right, like it's a it's degrees of how much you're actually willing to break character in the end, I think. But it's one of those things where it and I find it's the same with with player characters, which is why I kind of got into it so much with our alignment discussion because, like, at the end of the day, like you're playing these characters and they evolve as their story continues to be played out. So if you bring in a significant NPC enough times, right, NPC is going to grow with their experiences. So something that wasn't necessarily, quote unquote, in character for their first appearance and like the first kind of like snapshot the Party gets of them, isn't necessarily going to be...

...out of character the ten time after. Especially let's say they made like a like a like a neutral, good NPC, and then they bring them along on their murder Hobo we adventures. Suddenly it's probably not going to be as out of character for them to do something like steal their liar cheats as it would have been when they first met this character. Right, true enough, true, not. What do you think, though? I I think that it's acceptable to break out of character, so to speak, if it adds fun or drives the story. So or if a character starts getting really annoying. So, for instance, kind of along the lines of the rogue that you're talking about, if the rogue that they meet is constantly stealing their crap, like the PCs crap all the time every time they see him. You know that that starts to get a little bit annoying if he shows up a lot. Right. So I might start changing that character specifically because the players start feeling might start feeling annoyed or, you know, something along those lines. Right, like, I would take that out just to change it up and and allow them to grow, I guess, as you said. But it almost feels to me like I'm forcing that change specifically for the players rather than as a character growth. And so for me to go and create a background for them that makes sense, for them to have this character growth later or after the fact seems wrong to me. This is vienuous. So it's totally you feel dirty about doing but you definitely it's that has to be done, you know. Yeah, I agree, like I mean, if the story is going stale, I've change in character. Dropping a bomb and absolutely like doing a one hundred and eighty is perfectly acceptable, I think, at a little spur, like you said. Right. Yeah, yeah, so that was my last critical thought. Can't believe it. Crazy almost want to tack on another one here, I think. If you won't mind, I'll slip into my next weekend a little early and kind of flip this question a bit. WHOO, because I kind of misinterpreted what you said at first and okay, I'm curious now. Okay, you said it. Did you ever break character as a DM? Yeah, and now I'm curious to know. Do you guys ever break character as your character of the DM? Does that make sense? So I stopp being the DM for a second you. Do you ever like have moments where you're like you got to stop being the the DM and just kind of slip into like a a different role? Does it? I'm not sure if I'm coming myself. Well, I kind of get a real high level for me, so I think I understand what you're saying. I think the only times I've had to do that is like if when I'm in DM mode, I tend to just like be like, Oh yeah, no, that's how this works. Oh yeah, no, that's how this works. Oh yeah, no, this is how it works. Don't worry, you're doing it right. By the way, by the way, sorry, gonna in reject here. To all of our non Canadian listeners, when Jordan says Oh yeah, no, that means yes, Oh yeah for sure, or Oh no, yeah, for sure. Oh yeah, no, sorry for talking how I talk, but it is it is still fair point. Yes, on on that note, if I'm telling a player constantly...

...like yes, these are the correct rules and yes, keep going this way, it starts to feel like I as the DM and messing with the atmosphere, and so it starts to feel like laws are being put in place and it becomes a mechanical game instead of a role playing game. So in those instances, that's when I'll have to slip into a character or I'll have to just completely fade into the background and let the players figure it out for themselves. That is that kind of what you're getting at, kind of I have a have a small anecdote. That's a bit sure. In line and Jordan, you were there for this session, so I guess some mostly explained to Carlos and our lovely audience. There's only things, but I'm not following this whatsoever. Well, well, here's the thing. I was I was running a session recently, and this is a session. There were four of my players in the session. Jordan was one of them, and these are with the exception of one who is joined relatively recently but who has been doing phenomenally well at picking up on the rules. These are all experienced players. I've been playing with them since we started playing dd for the most part. And at one point in Jordan, in character, asked these other players if they knew anything about a particular God. And this was kind of after a long line of everybody just kind of dragging their feet and going on with whatever the person talking happened to be doing. And so Jordan says, Oh, does anybody know anything about this one God? And there's a brief pause and every player just goes nope. In Jordan says they're going okay, and I had to like, I had to stop, I had to break DM and I had to go okay, guys, I I shouldn't be telling you this. I know that you can make a religion check here. Yes, that's something that's available to you as a player, that you can do to find out more, and that's definitely like in the moment and even, like, looking back now, I feel dirty doing that. No, yeah, it feels so. No, I disagree with you completely. I think that is you being a DM. Yeah, it is, but you are breaking the atmosphere, like I was talking about, like you're breaking the atmosphere of the game. But that's because the DM has to be there to tell people what they're able to do, especially with new players. But I think that happens even if the DM is clarifying a rule right like. That technically breaks the atmosphere the yeah, well, I think anytime that you're explaining something to a player, it's technically breaking the atmosphere of your game. I think. Well, what where I was headed more with that question, I think, is whether you, as a DM, get stuck with the improvisational. Always say yes and to your players. Gotcha. Okay, that's sort of how I interpreted it. Right where, like? where, as a DM, do you draw the line and go no, you can't just crenate and create and create, although it's like you know great that you really want to add to the story, right like, you also don't want to get you don't. You also don't want to let like maybe a player get from realizing that they can create the world as they go because they're suggestive the regular ways and control. Yeah, certainly there are certain moments where I won't say yes and right like. Again, like we mentioned before, if a characters like give me obliterating an NPC's like story plot for the sake of a good laugh, but it doesn't really largely affect where the characters are going. And sure that doesn't make that much of a difference, right? That's a moment where, yes, and would be okay, but if this is like the main story and all of a sudden they're like, well, what if this character isn't the bad guy and is actually the good guy and we'll pay US two tho gold each for doing nothing? Well, that's not a thing. That's not and that's a very like on the nose sort of example. But like if a player is catching on that their suggestions are happening to turn cannon in your game all...

...the time, and I think it's important for you, as a DM, to have that moment where you step away and go hey, you know, don't tread on me. I agree. Good discussion, though I look forward to being the person to ask these questions very soon into taking this role. But for now, Jordan, you got your last sign off, so I'll let you take you here. All right, guys, it has been a pleasure. Thank you so much for listening to me and for dealing with all of my ridiculous questions, I will be moving to a different set of their segments. So see you're again do this. No worries, guys, but yeah, no, thank you again. Hit US up on instagram and and let us know you know where. How do you guys feel about being a DM in your campaign? Says it break the atmosphere too much. And Yeah, we'll see you guys all next time.

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