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Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 3, Episode 24 · 1 year ago

Ep. 48 - It's Not Stealing, It's Borrowing

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

 This week on Triple Advantage, we discuss ideas that we’ve “borrowed”
from board games and video games for our campaigns, Jordan walks us through
balancing combat encounters, and we look at your favorite settings to run
adventures in.

This week on triple advantage, we discuss ideas that we've borrowed from board games and video games for our campaigns. Jordan walks us through balancing combat encounters and we look at your favorite settings to run adventures in. As always, keep it locked in our social media to keep up with our new releases. Enjoy the show. Wow, tired morning, hug guys. Welcome back everybody, members of the Society, to yet another echoes of the outlands. And recently I've been battling with something a little bit difficult and I had to talk to you guys. I've been stealing some ideas, lots of concepts, lots of mechanics. I'm trying to build out a new way that I can start dming, trying to develop some house rules and, as such, we've divulged into going online, watching other people's streams and essentially just pulling from other games to try to make a fun little set of player mechanics to use in future campaigns. But I want to bounce a question off to you guys. What have you guys stolen for? I'm talking like mechanically speaking, anything from board games or video games that you've really enjoyed that you've sort of poured it into your own home games for DD. Want to hear about a guys, I resent the implication that I stole anything and you can talk to my lawyer. Yeah, adapted about that. Does that make me more comfortable? Much better? Thank you. Yes, heavy air quotes. Yeah, I be you taken anything Braden? I'm trying to start. Sorry, adapted. Okay, I'll go second. I'm still thinking about it. Sure, mechanically speaking, I don't think I've taken anything yet for my home games. Mechanically it's a it's a lot more difficult, I think, for me to pull things in. I have like it's a lot easier to take concepts like like story plots or locations or character concepts, that kind of thing, but the mechanics, generally speaking, I found I just take from the stuff that's given in the books. Now we are playing in Braden. I are playing in a homebrew campaign with our good friend Matt, who has put together and xcom campaign. Yeah, that was yes, I remember this and it's really cool. So he's adapted all of the mechanics from xcom and turned it into a bit of a V system. It's really weird, but really cool. Cover is super important. You know, you don't have like the greatest of equipment to kind of deal with accens. Instead you're supposed to end up and cover to kind of keep yourself protected and, you know, then you use some of the same rules for attacking and that kind of thing. But it's very it's very interesting so far. I'm enjoying it. Turns are also done differently in xcom, where the entire team takes a turn and then the other team takes a turn kind of thing, or the enemies. So that that's very interesting. It's cool. It's cool to see that kind of stuff. It makes me think about like, Oh hey, what kind of, you know, cool mechanics can I throw into, you know, my game? But I haven't done anything with it yet, mechanically speaking. Yeah, and I guess sorry. Go ahead. Well, I guess I was just going to expand a little bit and that's kind of where I was approaching this from. It's like more of a playerics sperience. Si thing, like something simple that I've been really toying with a a and I wanted to introduce into my games is the, for example, rolling stealth when you are possibly seen by an enemy, rather than like saying I'm entering stealth mode and sneaking around, you know, like rolling, rolling a stealth check before you start sneaking around the dungeon. I think that that's crouch exactly. I think it's a really subtle change, right, but it does sort of give you that that sense of ohh, you're...

...now exploring and you have like the the risk of being caught, rather than, Oh, I rolled a twenty five, I can just freely explore anything in here with utter confidence and walk around. Right, it does. I think that just kind of knowing that ahead a time might detach you as a player from the threats that might occur just because you rolled super high, and that kind of goes along with everything. Right. So that's that's somewhat the approach that I was taking with regards to these like post rules and mechanical changes. Is something that could actually affect like the player perception in game. So it's happening. But, Bratins, are you were going to say something? Yeah, I was just going to say that I for for Mat's campaign that we're talking about. I really enjoy one thing that he did, and that's essentially because we're all kind of in this unit together and on this team in the game. We were all given walky talkies and through that we can kind to talk over to each other, and that's really eliminated. The not eliminated, but it's put the kind of Super Meta talk back into the game as an in character thing. So we're usually like you might sit around like as players and be like all right, well, I'm going to move up and attack this, or you should be saving your action to do this in case that doesn't go wrong, and it's like that's and you're looking at the DMM kind of going like that's that's pretty it's pretty Meta. These guys are like on opposite sides of the dragons. There's no way that they'd be able to communicate that in game. But now we've got these devices that literally make us able to go like, okay, I'm approaching around from the left. You like hang out over there and then we'll take the shot. It's like yeah, that sounds good and I like that. I like that we've been kind of given the freedom to do that without without being super out of character in terms of in terms of yours, Carlos. I'm interested to see how that affects combat, because I know, I know a lot of ropes that like to bonus action stealth and just kind of go into stealth mode for the next eight rounds and that's it, and just kind of pop out and then shooting then sink back into it. I'm curious to see how that's part. That's part of it, right. It's something that I've noticed that, with regards to the rogues, is that, at least maybe the way that some people like to play them is to just do that attack, go into stealth, attack, going to stealth, but that's not always possible, right, yeah, and I think that because of the self being that like, Oh, as a bonus action you can and you can, you know, hide, right, it's I think it's you can attempt to hide, yeah, right, and and in the same vein as like rolling high and having utter confidence that you're not going to be seen, and rolling low and being like well, fuck, everybody in this entire map knows where I am now. Right, it's still gives you that same sort of effect at the end, which is like the players now aware of what the possible outcomes might be, something that like the like enemies might not even walk around right, but all of a sudden you're like super confident that you're selfy. HMM, it's yeah, stealth is always a weird mechanic. I think in D and D it's so hard to accurately portray just because they're there's a slight difference between like hiding and not being seen, if you know what I mean. So like, yeah, if someone were to hide, that would mean that the you know, the the enemy, actually doesn't know where they are. But the hide action uses a bonus action in combat. Is More like they can no longer see me. They might know where I am because, you know, I popped out from this corner and then ran across the hallway and went behind another wall. So they can logically think they're probably behind that wall, but they can no longer see them right, yeah, unless they move towards that area. Kind of thing. That's how it's. Nobody uses it like that, though. It's always essentially minor invisibility. Yeah, it's always interesting when you see, when you when you kind of picture all these scenarios from like a like if you were in a video game, per say. Right, it's like the whole Oh, you hide behind a rock and all of a sudden the end, the Endemy NPC is like, Huh, would you go? It's a Sassin's creed. I sit on the bench. Huh, pretty go. He's must be around here somewhere. I know it. Yeah, but those things are so clunky in a real life sort of role playing scenario. Yeah, assassin's creed was always so funny, though, for that stealth like just walk into yes, I am in a group of three, I'm hidden, no one can see me. HAH. Yeah, now and and I think that to that ban right, there is something to say with regards to like the the the theme of your adventure and adding mechanics that might, you know,...

...encourage certain player actions. Right, like, for example, let's say that you're setting was like in a monster hunter type of world. Right, it would be kind of cool if the players had access to some sort of like monster identification tool that they could use. Right, it might encourage more strategic play just by giving them an extra resource. Yeah, you gave us like follows. Right, well, we still has. Let's see, let's not be around the bush. Wh What we did. I mean, I wasn't there for that, so I mean, as far as I know, you guys acquired that completely legally here. I can't wait to share that. It wouldn't matter to heart or not. Arthur new to it wouldn't really matter to him. But all this kind of provided that sort of sense of you you know what certain creatures are in the area, if you prep some some knowledge beforehand, right. And like I mean in general, it's always cool, like it's a balance, I at least for me, right, because you introduced creatures as a DM and I would like my players to know what they are, but necessarily, like the characters, wouldn't necessarily, you know, know what certain creatures are in this world. So then it kind of deters away from like Oh cool, look at this giant fight. You're fighting some giant unknown fiend of sorts and you know at the end of the at the end of it, you, your party defeats the monster and the players are like, well, what the hell did we just face? We don't know anything about that. Seems kind of I don't know' like to me. It seems kind of like, like I would like to know this information, right, like I would like to add like I've always I've always enjoyed the mechanic wise, right, like can pokemon. Every time you encounter a new POKEMON, it's locked and you have access to that information, and I've always enjoyed that kind of mechanic in games because it lets you sort of see your accomplishments and I think that it can actually like lead to some interesting things. Let's say, if we were to to design something for an epic right, where players could compare the different monsters that they've slain, and at least to me, that would add another letter, another layer of like complexity to the game. Obviously, but I don't know, some some you sitting some exciting, some collectible item right. I've always kind of assumed that the character would know more about the monsters than I would generally. I mean, I've read bits and pieces of the monster manual. Mostly I go to it when I'm looking for a specific monster and I'll look through like names and stuff like that if I'm doing that for like any of my games, so that I'm not giving myself the spoilers per se as I go into different like campaigns and stuff like that. I don't want to go in there thinking, Oh, I know this creature has, you know, three attacks and it does this amount and I has you know, plus fourteen to hit and it has eighteen acy. I want to, you know, figure that out in game kind of thing. It's kind of fun to me to be like, Oh, I don't know whether this is going to be a super easy fight or whether it's going to be something that is going to completely destroy our entire Party. I mean, obviously, usually if it's a bigger threat, it's a bigger monster, but that's not always the case and it could be very interesting. You know that that way. Mind you, I think it's completely possible that, you know, a character knows what a Goblin is and you know, has a good idea as to how much damage they need to do in order to kill these things and how easy they are or hard they are, you know, based on what they look like. Something that I something that I've Read Online, is actually, for example, you can allow all your players to possibly know about any creature that they're facing, but you use that creatures CR level and like, let's say, a DC nate, like a you make that the DC of like a nature check for the players to know anything about those creatures interesting the full CR levels, so like one quarter something like that. You're tell you associated to you associated to the CR level. But I mean it like it would make sense, right, like let's say, yeah, you have a creature that has a CR level of one quarter. Well, yeah, everybody knows what a butterfly is. This it's not like a special thing in game, right, like a spider, like yeah, maybe, maybe someone, if they get a natural one, they don't recognize it and they don't understand what it is. But I think for the most part, lower cee our creatures like Goblins, Col bolds and stuff like that, those are things that at least most people in the game world would know something about, right, unless you're like again, this is completely exciting. Dependent, and this is obviously in my idea of like a world where you have adventures going out and like logging information somewhere. Right, people would know about goblins. People would know generally what Goblin traits are and how to handle goblins.

So why not make that information available to players? In my head, whereas like a Black Dragon, as I go shit, like not that many people have seen that. Therefore, exactly players weren't know much about it. I would I would almost go the other way. So, with the exception of things like goblins or co bowls that are like so common they're essentially a trope at this point. The lower the CR creature, the higher it is on the check to find out anything about it. Because when you have something like a dragon, maybe people like, maybe people have only encountered a few ever, but those few are so legendary that they've been recorded time and time and time and time and time again. Everybody, it is folkloors about dragons, about their weaknesses, about their strengths, about the powers. So everybody has grown up hearing about this. Versus nobody knows what an edit cap is. Nobody's looking at an Ed cap like Oh, yes, that great beast, that was slight. No, it's a weird spider thing that's there. So nobody's like, there's not a ton of information on there. There's like a passing mention of like Oh yeah, somebody, I guess, thought this thing once, but it's not a heroic deed enough to according to tales and it's not a significantly and raster. Right. Yeah, that's like a folklore thing. Like how much, quote unquote, information do you know about these things? Because the other thing about that stuff is that maybe you have like false information about this thing. Because of the you know, tails surrounding it. Maybe it's been like drawn up as this you know, super terrifying, horrifying thing that's like ridiculously strong and I can do all these certain things. But it was just, you know, a tale that's been told in in the town because, you know, they are all commoners, so everything to them is terrifying and horrifying and very powerful, you know. So I get what you're saying. That seems like a religion check to me, almost as opposed to a nature check, which might give you more solid information. Like if I were to look at, let's say, I don't know, I come across and umber hulk or something like that, I would look at the Umber Hulk and I'd say, Oh, you know, like based on my nature proficiency, I can see that it's it has a carapist, so it will probably have a fairly high AC and, you know, it looks like it's using it's not really using its eyes, it more fheel. It looks like it's, you know, somehow sensing what's going on or something like that. You know, it has tremor sense, sure, but so how does that chick scale with a CR then? How do you how do you, yea, instantly get worse it looking at a dragon and go and like well, right, exactly, so it gets it's weird. Right. So it would be like a commination of the two because, like you'd have to know stories of like, Oh, it can breathe fire, you know, or like I think it also comes down to like how much you track what you players. Yeah, right, because, like, if you're allowing players to Redo nature checks against the creature, then that kind of defeats the purpose of having them in the first place, because the players could always like, quote unquote, upgrade their checked later on. Right. So, if you know if your character has if it's like the first time you see a dragon, your role in nature check, Oh shit, you got a five. Well, you've heard about dragons. You know they breathe right, like maybe that kind of Lare carries over into your knowledge. You know they breathe fire for the most part, or something you've heard. You've heard about someone, you've heard about dragons that breathe fire, but you don't necessarily know that dragons can breathe different types of attacks. Right, but then you never let that player roll, at least for a while, on like Dragon General Dragon Knowledge. Right, right then that then the weight of that role sticks right. It's like, Hey, do I know anything about this item? No, you don't, and for the foreseeable future you unless you spend quality time learning about it, you won't get any more information from it. And in ties in with like things like, I mean the tendency for players to Redo checks as a party. Right, like the entire Party goes. I want to investigate this this room. Player A and B don't find anything, players C and D are like, Oh shit, maybe if we do it we'll find something. Right. So that's that's actually something. Something else that I've been doing with to just keep the the story momentum going. Is like limiting the amount of checks that are permissible for a room. Right, if everybody's looking for something, then collectively you're all have a higher chance of doing of finding something, of finding what you're looking for. But you know, if in an if in a set of actions, two players are looking for a room and then the other players are doing something else, it's it always felt weird to me to then let the other players be like, oh well, shit, like if our actions didn't pan out, then we'll just do the actions of...

...the other players and we'll just kind of like stockpile until we can find some information. Right, HMM. I mean because, like I've so difficult to get that kind of a mechanic into the game. Well, think thinking about it. Just what's say? That's a simple thing. would be something like there's a trapdoor and you need a strength check to open it. Two players failed to do it, so the rest of the party tries to open the gate with the strength check. Right, whereas you could be like you're too strongest players fail there for everybody else. That's the you know, if like your strongest players fail at it, then everybody else will fail at it because and are they? Yeah, are. And then you're saying the rules would stick kind of thing and you wouldn't be able to like reroll to try and reopen that gate or that door or whatever it is. Yeah, exactly, because here's the thing, because if there's a gate that closes and you're giving the players a chance to open it with a strength check, it kind of defeats the purpose if you just let them retry that strength check as many times as possible until it's open. At that point you may as well not have closed the door right, right, whereas they have, if you have it that you know. I don't know. I'm just sort of like half the situation to like like if they were like running out of a dungeon and you know it was a trap the whole time or something like that, and the gate starts closing and you know, the players go all we got to grab that door and try and lift it kind of thing, right and like open it up. You know, the players would go, okay, we got this kind of thing and they'd spend their they have to spend their whole action, you know, get trying to lift that door up and maybe they fail the first time. So now they're stuck in this room with creatures on their back, you know, rushing to try and take them out. So now they got either decide do we turn and fight them, or do we try and lift this door again? Kind of thing, you know. So in that scenario I think it's completely fine for characters. It was just it would be, you know, the amount of time it takes for them to lift it up as opposed to the fact that they're not strong enough to lift it. If that makes sense. Yeah, I guess, because if they roll a natural one, it just means that you know they're take it's taking them too long, as opposed to like, well, this guy has twenty strength, you know, normally he'd be able to, you know, lift this kind of a thing. It, you know, I don't know, it can get a little bit weird that way. It depends on the scenario, though. You're right where it's like, okay, if you really don't want them to be able to open a door kind of thing, then you got to set the DC high enough that feasibly, it would be very, very difficult for you know, said characters to be able to lift it. I don't know, it's it's always one of those clunky things for me with this game. Yeah, players can like just stack on top of each other to get actions completed, and I think there's I mean as a DM, maybe if you notice that they're doing this, you could just lower the DC of whatever task he is that they're doing and that that will help, you know, because if the entire parties helping, it make sense that it would be an easier task to perform. But at the same time there should be a cap in my idea, right, like if, if, if, like, if you having players, let's say, look taking perception checks for something, right, and the first two have low roles. Well, then I would imagine that they would go back to the party and be like Hey, guys, we didn't see anything. With the rest of the party then just be like I don't trust your eyes. Let's go, let's go look, go check again. Yeah, yeah, and I feel like that's something that always happens and it's just like Oh, the like the party collectively wants a task done, so they'll all dump actions into that to complete it. I'm just trying to think of a way to make it so that, yeah, using actions is more seen as a resource, especially like outside of combat, right, like you're like, and that's why I've kind of always defaulted back to time, and I think that that's something that I've that I've enjoyed doing. It's like maybe you can succeed at something, but in game you will feel that there's like a cost to it, right, like if you rolled low for a couple of times and then high to complete the task and be like okay, collectively as a group, there's Guy, this will take you four hours to do or some right, that right, which might deter that like, Oh shit, hmm, yeah, times. Definitely a good like cost. I think it's sort of like Fluxi. Resource that you can use across all the players. And Yeah, the thing is is that like those kind of like checks themselves are different from one another. If you know. I mean like a strength thing is literally something that you are trying to either lift or break or whatever. So if a person is not strong enough, maybe we need to set like a you must be at least, you know, have at least an eighteen in your strength score in order to do anything to this thing. Maybe that's something that we could use, right, if it's not feasible for them to be able to actually lift it. Right,...

...if it is, then maybe it's I'm trying to work on a system for skill challenges and things like that, where it's like a collective amount of points that you have to put into something in order to be able to lift it. So instead of saying, you know, the DC is twenty five, maybe it's like, collectively you have to make a you have to get up to thirty points in this strength check, and that can take over a certain amount of time, sure, but like that's how it that's how it goes. That's how I'd be kind of yeah, exactly, and you can put as many people on that as would make sense in the scenario kind of thing, and then you can all kind of work together on this one task and you know, once you get to that thirty points, it's now lifted off and you guys have succeeded at this task. I would do drinking games the same way, kind of thing, where it's like okay, yeah, in front of you it's not like, oh, I can't drink it at this time. It's more like it takes you longer to drink this time. So if it costs, you know, twenty points in constitution, you have to roll each time. Make a constitution check. Okay, you rolled the ten, you've made it halfway through the cup, you know. Yeah, keep going. And I mean going back to the the theme of this particular discussion, I guess like a good example of something that I've stole in with regards to that mechanic and similarly, in the vein of what you've been talking about, is, I don't you guys have seen me in my campaigns telling you the DC's of certain tasks ahead of you doing it. Yeah, and this is actually something that I in quotations adapted from Brennan Lee Mulligan's dimension. Twenty Games that he runs with this players. He actually lets it. He lets them know the DC's of certain actions that they might take during combat. So, for example, if the player wants to run and jump across a small ledge during their movement action, he'll say like hey, you can totally accomplish something like this, but the DC will be blank, right, and I think that that is a really good way of letting the players know how difficult certain tasks are going to be and let them judge the risks. HMM, with regards to whether they want accomplish it. First is just like I'm gonna just jump this ravine right. Well, like you, as the Bard, might see a DC fifteen athletics as kind of difficult, right, but you, as the barbarian, with fucking plus seven modifier and the Tomb of anihilation campaign, definitely, or plus ten. Actually it's a plus an athletics modifier for Leona are yeah, for for the Breparion in your campaign. That's trivial, right, that's five or higher. Right, so those actions can easily be translated into some sort of, you know, risk assessment for the player and character once. So I thought that was a beautiful sort of Macan't like yeah, a little home rule to add. It's especially useful for people who are newer to as well. I think, like telling someone, Hey, it's going to be a DC this in order to do something, you know, get somem like in the game, like Oh, okay, based on my character, this might be difficult. Yes, and it also and it also makes an it also kind of makes a the the die rolling a little bit more exciting as well, right, because it's like, Oh shit, I'm aiming for a number I have, I have a bar that I want to it's like that little gamblers paradise, right. It's you know, you know what you need to to succeed here and you're just trying to roll the bones to see if you landed better. Is. So that's about. What about a see? Would you tell the party that? Like, I know you haven't so far. Um Ac is a little weird one, right, because there's certain creatures that are heavily armored, that are clearly heavily armored that I might just let the party know, right, right, whereas, on the other hand, some of the characters have a high AC but aren't armored at all, so they're just start a stuff. Yeah, fast, you know. So I think with our guards A. See, it's hard because, I mean a se AC is a very Meta game kind of bit of bit of information. Right, it's definitely something that it's not an RP element per se. Like characters aren't talking to one another about how how much ac they have, right, right, whereas players mightn't necessarily talk about, you know, like how fast something is, right, but they might decide like, oh, it's not a good idea to bring my knife up to this person. Instead, I'm going to use a spell that, you know, would might affect the person kind of thing. Yeah, for sure, right, like maybe, maybe. But I agree with you there. I wouldn't want to tell my players the AC either, just because I think I'd have to just kind of describe what it is that makes them either hard to hit...

...or not. Kind of thing. Maybe, and like it's always fun to kind of like figure that out in combat to like, you know, I miss on an eighteen. Oh Dang, Oh Dang, I missed on an eighteen kind of thing, right, I guess, and Trot to hit. Yeah, and in a way right, like you could treat AC in the same vein. If you guys have ever played any of like the fallout games, when you do that focus shot, you can see your percent chance of hitting certain body parts, I could kind of translate it to that and that might actually play. That might it might depend on the kind of game setting that you're running right, because maybe something like Matts xcom campaign could use some could really benefit from something like that right right, by telling the players, Hey, this, this character is a see while behind this trash can is this number, because it's that risk assessment in that sort of strategy. Yes, vain right, but I don't know if I would want to introduce that in like regular campaigns just because it does see it. It does seem a little too yeah, DD is more men about. I think it's more focused on RP, like role play. Right. Yeah, xcom is a strategy game, so it makes sense, I think you're right, to have an xcom themed game to be able to like, okay, there's this percent chance that I'm going to hit maybe I need to move to a different position so I can actually make a shot at them, kind of thing, as opposed to, you know, in in dd it's very much like you should be just doing whatever your character would do in the situation, regardless of the risk assessment. I guess like risk is skip assessment is part of it, but it's like your character would do it individually and wouldn't necessarily know the percentage that they're going to hit something. Right. Yeah, yeah, no, no, I agree completely. No, and I was just going to add on to that. I was trying to think maybe like in a in a regular dnd game, non nonexcomport, maybe you could have something like that, but I think I would devolve like to visual cues or something. Right. Yeah, whereas like you might see a Goblin, but if you're playing, maybe eventually, once we get to play in real life again, maybe you can add little like a card dis sort dividers to show you know, like Oh, this Goblin is behind some boxes, but you know, like we're going to put as a visible thing on here that tells you it's got like plus to ac due to like quarter cover. HMM. Right, so you as a player can immediately see like Oh, this goblind is behind something, they're harder to hit. Right, what do? You might not know what that it and you know, might not know what the difficulty of hitting is, but you know that they're harder to hit rather than yeah, you know, are they behind cover or they whatever? Right, like sometimes it's pretty easy to tell what the AC of someone is, though, to like if they're in late armor and they have a shield, there's a very good chance that they're AC is twenty. You know. Yeah, it's it's like I get that. Like some situations you could probably just tell the party straight up, like yeah, this is what it is. You would know this because plate armor's a thing that people know about. Yeah, and I mean that obviously comes down to player experience. To like, if you have players that have fought for yeah, of Goblins, they know what we're see the guards. Would the characters know what played armor is and a shield? So could you then not, you know, tell them, hey, you know that in the shop you could get this and you've seen people wear this before, something like that, or you know, you would have to aim for these parts or something like that. I don't know. Yeah, be it's maybe it's a little Meta, but at the same time it's like, well, there's a good chance that adventures know what armor is. You missed something funny. They're, like you said, the aim for these parts? Would you? Would you let your players aim for specific weak points per se, for reduced chances for their AC or something if it was a larger creature? I like the idea of having like certain weak points. So if I had a dragon and it's like it's like smouke where there's like that Chink, that one spot where it was hit by an Arrow in the past, kind of thing, and it's missing a portion of its scales there, maybe it's easier to hit if you aim for that part, but it's in like a difficult part to hit or something like that. You got to be on a certain side of it right. So you can't just always aim at it. You got to be on the correct side of this beast and you gotta, you know, like move up to that spot where it is kind of thing and then make a hit at it. If you're arranged, character might be a bit easier, but you still got to be on the correct side. So and maybe the dragon brings its wing down every now and then to kind of cover that area up or something like that, you know, because it would also know...

...of its weakness. Yeah, yeah, you would have to segment your fights into sort of phases right, like the dragon lands, the wings are down and that little spot is covered and when it's flying, then that's when you have your chances players. So attack right. Yes, yeah, yeah, there's some cool thoughts here. I'm looking forward to looking forward to this, these newer campaigns to run in the future. I'm still sort of building out what sort of rules to bake onto the game itself and what's the rules I want to just mess around with a little bit. But it's all been good. I mean like as anything. Right, like this is all super atove and everybody's home game becomes their own sort of personal half potch of homebrew. And Yeah, sure, let's let the barbarian have three attacks since level two, because when I not ha ha, I mean whatever it's. I think it's worked out. So yeah, like it's fine. I just add more monsters at this point. Yeah, things are easy to balance, but, like I mean, the the only, the only concerned. There's a like that kind of that kind of stuff translates into bad habits across games. But anyways, you can talk about this more extensively once a once I finish this part of this past campaign that actually have some new content update you guys with the future. I'm sure you guys will be a part of it, anyways, with most of play games. But so that's it for me today. Jordan. Speaking of encounters, guys, we're going into the Dungeon Masters Guide to talk about encounters. We are on we're reading through the entire dungeon master's guide. We're on page eighty one talking about creating encounters. Now it's at the we're at specific quickly creating combat encounters. We went through the character objectives last time. So this is where things get kind of interesting. I I mean it's weird in terms of like how they've set it up. I think I read a little bit ahead just to get a like fuller idea of what they do for combat encounters ahead of time, because there's a lot of numbers here and stuff like that. So I'm not going to like try and like read each individual number out here for you guys. Instead, I'm just going to talk a little bit about it. And this kind of comes into play with like what Carlos and Carlos was just talking about here. If for creating encounters, guys, it's it's really interesting. How do you guys normally determine and counter creating. Like what do you guys do when you are choosing monsters for your party? Um, I usually based it off of theme and a lot of the Times I try to build encounters with monsters that the party hasn't seen before, just because I find that exciting, at least with regards to encountering new things in the game. Yep. And and what about like difficulty level? I guess really depends on the one where they are right. So, say it's a level four party. Generally, what what would you throw at them? Okay, so the way that I've sort of developed a sense of encounters is that if you're sort of moving forward in the story, your encounters are going to be more difficult. So with a the things that I've been playing with a lot of players in my campaigns for the most part. So thus the difficulty for encounters would scale differently per se, but I would say, I put it normally two or three CR higher than what the party would consider like for a normal level four party. Okay, because because I've been playing with so many players and there's so many more player actions. Right, like when you guys were fighting the beholder, that was a CR fourteen fight. But it didn't really feel like that because he goes don't so much damage. So, I mean there was a good chance we are still going to die in that fight. Yeah, and I mean there is a like and I think with that kind of encounter there is a huge risk when you have elements that can absolutely shut down a party, like petrification. Right. So those are things that you always have to account for where like because, for example, in that Medusa fight, you guys were all fighting one Medusa. The encounter far read it on paper, right, says it's not that difficult, but petrifying half of the party in one action is kind of fucking nasty. Yep, right. Yeah, so I try to keep I try to pay special attention to to if monsters had abilities that can pay, paralyze, charm otherwise sort of remove party members from combat. Those are I think...

...those are the most dangerous sort of mechanics in this game, because those are the ones that are like that ultimate risk, right, like they're they're the shit, like that's what makes monsters deadly in the world, regardless of player level. Right, you could be a level eighteen player, you could still get petrified. Yeah, that's and monsters that rely on checks versus hits because, yes, you have it, you could have a jacked out AC, but that doesn't matter if you've got a terrible decks throw and that's all you're making, because that's what all the attacks base themselves on instead of a hit modifier. Yeah, I mean. And then that that sort of boils down to like more of a strategical thing for the players are, because you could say, like Oh, in Jordan's example, right, like we do see that this character is wearing a lot of armor, so fuck trying to attack it, we're just going to use magic on it, right, yeah, force it to make deck saves, because you know that it probably doesn't move as fast in that armor. Yeah, exactly for them, but for the most part I try to. I try to I try to put it a couple see if we're using the CR level just as a baseline for everybody, I try to put a couple CR higher than the average party difficulty Ra based on because of carriage player actions. Of Okay, so that's so that let's say it was a level four party with for people. Yeah, then you would still go to three CR higher. I would probably put like one or two see r higher at that point not maybe not goes high. Yeah, but I mean you so like that's still to me the way that you can write make a difficult encounter per se at least more consistently. M So what about you, Braden? I? Well, I see that there's the chart here. Yeah, and I don't use the chart per se, but I use something that uses the chart. So I use a encounter calculator. Really, it's kind so you put in the number of players that you have, you put in the level of the players and that will spit out a new calculation that still has the XP like the chart does, but yeah, very easy, medium, hard, deadly for your party specifically, and then I can struct it around that. So I tend to take that and then replug in what I was already going to plug in. And then it's like, yeah, is that a little too much? All right, let's tone it down a little bit. Is that not quite enough? Let's throw in some side creeps, let's buff up it's a see a bit. That's ad some extra health onto the things that they don't three shot. It right, very interesting. What what? I Guess Combat Creator do you use? Then? I literally just use de I just Google D D encounter. Got It later and there's that. Whatever the first length that pops up is cool. I know my brother uses one as well. I don't know what it is. So far I have just gone through the book and been like, Oh, yeah, this would probably work. Their cere this all throw in x number just to I don't know. I've kind of done it on the fly, even though I'm creating them in advance most of the time. Well, it's easier when we have a party of for, because the muster any ways, in theory balance for a party of for as soon as you yet from that on either side becomes a lot harder to adjust for. Yeah, but it's also super weird, so I'm going to get into that now. So I'm going to hop into this here. It gives you four different difficulties that you can have for an encounter. You have the easy difficulty, the medium difficulty, the hard difficulty and the deadly difficulty. Now it gives you XP thresholds based on character level. So if you want, if you have first at first level character and you want a deadly encounter, it gives you a hundred XP. So if it's only one character and its first level, you can go and find a monster that is one hundred xp maximum kind of thing. Is What they're saying for a deadly encounter. So and then if you have like a bunch of Party members, now you got to add up like the different party members levels. So if you had again, if they were okay. So they give the example here later on for determining the Parties XP threshold. For example, if your party includes three third level characters and one second level character, the parties total XP thresholds would be as follows. For the deadly encounter it's one thou four hundred XP, which is four hundred plus four hundred plus four hundred plus two hundred. And then you the next tell you to go and total the monsters total XP and added up for all the monsters in the encounter. Every monster has an XP value in its STAP block. Then you have to modify the total XP for the for having multiple monsters.

So there's a threshold. So if you have two monsters, you multiply their XP value by one point five, if you have seven to ten, you multiply it by two point five. So you can kind of just do that. And then you compare the XP values to see if they fill fit into that threshold and then work from there. So Party party size is important for that as well. They talked about that here. The preceding guidelines assume that you have a party consisting of three five adventures. If the party contains fewer than three characters, apply the next highest multiplier on the encounter multiplier table. For example, apply a multiplier of one point five when the characters fight a single monster and a multiplayer of five for groups of fifteen or more monsters. If the party contains six or more characters, use the next lowest multiplayer on the table. So use a multiplayer of zero five for a single monster. So every time you go above it, it kind of like brings you down one multiplier level, which is interesting. Now it also talks about multipart encounters. So sometimes an encounter features multiple enemies that the party doesn't face all at once. For example, monsters might come at the party in waves. For such encounters, treat each discrete part or wave as a separate encounter for the purposes of determining its difficulty. So a party can benefit from a short rest between parts of a multipart encounter so they won't be able to sorry a party can't benefit from it. So they won't be able to spend hit dister, regain hit points and recover any abilities that require short rest to regain. As a rule, if the adjusted XP value for the monsters in the multipart encounter is higher than one third of the parties expected XP total for the Adventuring Day, the encounter is going to be tougher than the some of its parts. So here's the part that I think is weird. There is an adventuring day, so the assumption is that your party will face more than one battle her day in game, which I have found is almost never the case. I mean unless they're in a dungeon. Like in a dungeon, yeah, you're going to face off against a couple of like monsters, but usually those are like lower to your monsters. That will absorb a few of the parties resources, but not very much. But I guess that's what they're trying to say. Like if you're building a dungeon that way, then you use the adventuring day, but most of the time if I want to create like an exciting like encounter and it's a it's going to be the only one in the day. Like I don't know, like it's very interesting that they have like here's what you should do, and they expect that you're going to have multiple encounters instead of doing one encounter. That's very difficult for the party. Well, I think what what is a lot of potential to do several encounters in a day. The problem is that every party of ever encountered they get hit twice and it's like all right, long resttime. Guess gotta Light Down exactly now. May, exactly the day we're going to sleep. Yep, just like okay. And then there's also, like I've tried a couple times to throw like, you know, they try to sleep and then they get rolled up on by another encounter in the middle of the night and they got to wake up and that. But everybody hates that. Yeah, and they're just like that that wasn't fun, like why would you do that? Well, okay, yeah, I guess. Just always be on your peek them like yeah, it's ridiculous. HMM. There's something to be said for, you know, players and characters going into a combat not at full strength. You know, they're a little bit more afraid, but I think that makes it kind of interesting. But the main reason I don't do multiple encounters is not because I don't think it's a good idea resource wise and stuff like that. Mostly I do it because combat encounters take so long. Like you don't get anywhere if you're having three encounters every single adventuring day. You know, if you're on a, you know, week long trip and you hid an encounter, you know, even even once a day or twice a day, it's going to take you a few sessions just to get from point a to point B, you know what I mean? HMM. So I'm not sure if that's like worth it at that point. I'd rather have, you know, one larger encounter that happens along the way one time, you know, or something like that, just just because I like the story progressing. So for me...

...the combat is like, yes, I can throw in some combat, make them, you know, have some fun kind of thing, but I don't want that to be like the only thing that they're ever doing. Yeah, I mean in the tomb of a nihilation campaign that Carlos runs for us, like it's gotten to the point where we've been in this dungeon for like a year irl that's probably not actually yeah, like six months, but even then like weeks in game, because we have an encounter, we sleep and then we move to the next room. There's immediately another encounter. Everybody wants to sleep again. So I've got to the point where it's like it's an encounter and then I'm like a half health. I'm like, all right, we're going to the next rooms. Like no, we got it. We got a rest. We got no, we don't. This is taking way too long. Even in game. Are Like people are dying, we're trying to get this thing because people are dying. Everybody's like, I'm kind of tired. Like, Nope, get in the next room, fight it out. We're continuing on. Yeah, it's true. Short rests are like not a thing that's used very often. I've always found it sucks for like characters who are, I guess it's almost like they're proficient with short rest because they get all their stuff back, like fighters and warlocks. Shut it. Are these shure? Yeah, are, they are the short rest like members, like they get everything back on a short rest. But every time it feels like, okay, we're going to go into a fight and then it's like everyone's like, okay, I exhausted all my resources, I have to take a long rest and I'm like well, all right, like, I guess I get all my stuff back that way too, but like, come on really. But at the same time it was two goblins. Why are you out of everything? Why did you throw all of your level five spells at those two goblins? Yeah, yeah, it's always like the spellcasters to that are like yeah, I went and I spent like my fifth levels spell slots the whole time. I didn't use any can trips that fight because, you know, why bother with resource management when you can just long rest afterwards? Yeah, laugh at me for always using the alters. Plus, you know what, I got my spell still, I can keep going. That's right, that's right. So I don't know. The tough balance. That's a tough balance for sure. Yeah, like the I don't know, the timing, the time of it, the time consumption of battles is just it can be pretty grueling. Like I had one like the first dungeon that on my players did in the homebrew or in the home in the wild mount goodness, the one that I'm running, ha ha. You know, it was a smaller dungeon and it still took three sessions to get through half of it. I think. Yeah, and it was just like, Oh, this is going to be a long dungeon. You know, three week or three sessions means, you know, we only play like every other week. So that's that's like six weeks. That's a month and a half irl to get through half the dungeon. No thing. You you know, I want to move on get the story in there somehow. So if that's like everything like for a dungeon, that's fine. It's like, okay, I get that, but I'm not going to do that kind of thing like for normal everyday encounters. So I don't know, it's weird, but great. Yeah, do to do? They talk about modifying encounter difficulty based on certain things, so you should increase or decrease the encounter difficulty. This is on to page eighty four now. I've kind of skipped a little bit. Mostly just building your encounters on a budget, which I think they talked about earlier personally, and then they venturing day. They talk about and they talked about short rest. They talked about how most adventures will take two short rest of the day fly they only do long rest. And then modifying the encounter difficulty. So you increase or decrease it based on certain things, either benefits or drawbacks. So situational drawbacks can include things like the whole Party is surprised and the enemy isn't, the enemy has cover and the party doesn't, the characters are unable to see the enemy, or the characters are taking damage every round from some environmental effect or magical source and the enemy isn't. Or last situational effect they have here is the characters are hanging from a rope in the midst of a scaling and in the midst of scaling a sheer wall or cliff, stuck to the floor or otherwise in a situation that greatly hinders their more ability or makes them sitting ducks. So similar. Yeah, yeah, those are all kind of cool...

...things that I love to put into encounters, for sure. So it's basically just saying a just your difficulty level if that is a thing that is part of your encounter. So don't put in the deadly encounter when you've also got a few of these or like one or more of these drawbacks hindering the party. And now these things can also hinder, you know, the enemy if it does only affect the enemy and not the party, then you got to do it in the reverse way. So you up the up the ante to make it, I guess, more of a fair fight. Somehow. Sometimes I'm not sure a fair fight is the right way to go, but it is, I think, more fun for the players. I generally speaking, go with fair fights. I don't know about you guys. Do you guys like try and adjust it specifically to make it a fair ish fight, or do you think that you know, okay, well, if they encounter these guys like they're going to be tough to kill, or you know they're probably going to wipe you out? Well, and Ye have to deal with enough is go. All fights are fair? Yeah, not all fights are fair. Well, I think we've talked about before how the best encounters are the ones were, like, you just barely come out on top, or like, maybe a party member went down a couple times. Maybe you're down, I like your last few hit points. Maybe it did drain you all of your resources, but you still managed to just etch out that victory in the end. And I get that not all fights are fair, but to a certain extent, like throwing in the idea of like a party that can just wipe your party. Is it's a video game cutscene. That's not an encounter. Yeah, it's not. You're not playing the game. You're just you're going to get wiped and that's it's like now, but you throw that at the beginning of your campaign. Awesome that you have this anime rival to o the face. Now, that's the word. Not Steal that particular drop. That's some hoard of the Dragon Queen Shit. They're yeah, like, let's throw an adult blue dragon that these guys right at the beginning. It'll be fine. No, I'm so curious. Is the what you would have done, baron, if we just sided? Oh Fuck, that would have killed you. What about it? Yeah, now, no, don't do it. It is I yeah, I like to keep my fights semi fair, for sure. If it is going to be a difficult battle, if I think like there's no chance of them succeeding, maybe there's some sort of thing going on that makes it a little bit easier. or or I'm describe in detail, like do not try and attempt something here, you will likely perish. You know. Just gotta amp up that description somehow, because I have thrown in so part of the journey along the way, I've kind of stated, hey, there are certain paths that are more dangerous than the others, as they were traveling through the mountains, indicating that there might be things like frost worms or purple worms, kind of thing traveling through certain paths, and I've kind of like said, these are known paths that people stay away from because of these beasts. You know, try not to go this way. If you do, it might cut some time off of your adventure total or the amount of time it takes you to get to a place, but you also might die, you know. So I've thrown that kind of thing in there so that there is the option for them to go and try and take on these impossible tasks, but if there is a good chance that it will not go their way. So I've thrown that in there, but I've mostly avoided actually using things like that, and I think that's always difficult because unless unless, I think it's always difficult because for the most part, when you throw creatures at players, the first reaction of players have is always all right, boys, we got this, we got this, regardless of what it is. Yep, so level one, we're going to take on an ancient dragon. Here we go. Oh yes, DND, I've always wanted to fight a dragon. Like nod, ever, throwing this to Rask get me at level to you. Yeah, I think there's gotta be a little bit of that DM mistrust always present, because always, like I mean, you trust that the dam was going to take you through a fun story, but at the same time, right, like I it is your responsibility as a DM to maybe say like Oh, Hey, guys like your level to this...

...is a dragon. You're all like, this is you know that this would be extremely difficult, but translating that into the game world without sounding two Meta is sometimes a little tricky. Yeah, well, there was that. So, yeah, I really like Shit when you guys in the hold of the Dragon Queen Thought Your First Dragon against the the ancient white dragon in the end of the first one, because even the new players like the it wasn't even like skepticism of the DM like they was. It is if everybody just sat around for like forty five minutes going okay, we all know that dragons are really powerful. We've seen what they can do. We're all aware of this. We're not going to take this lightly. Even the new players we're like, we're not going to take this lightly and just Russian. We need a well structured plan if we're going to have any chance of actually escaping this encountered life. And I was like, yeah, that's exactly what you need. Like if you approach is hard encounter with a decent mindset and going in knowing that you're going to have a plan and that there's going to be a plan, and if you even if the plan goes a right like, knowing that like Oh man, but like that was a hard encounter. We did all that we could. That's right thing. It's another thing to just assume that's the DM's going to throw something, it's you that will be just conquered in seconds, and then just bum rush every single encounter that you have because what could go wrong? Yeah, it's great, it's great, it's yeah. The only time that, I mean the only time you wouldn't be able to do that kind of thing is if it's a creature they've never seen before or had any type of interaction with, or if it's a random encounter. Yeah, then it's kind of like, okay, do the characters know whether they need to run away or do they know you know they could potentially take this crew on. How much do their care characters know as opposed to the players? Because, yeah, especially for playing with new players, it's like, well, maybe they might not know. I have been blessed who with the Group of very cautious players. So when they come across encounters, their first instinct is to mistrust what is in front of them. Good, so they avoid the random encounters as much as possible, which is interesting. Also makes it very difficult to implement encounters into their campaign that I'm like, Hey, this might bestore related push well at yeah, and there's a there's difficulty there too, right, because like overcautiousness does, I mean I've found at least in Tumb campaign, does lead to long, long sessions. Right, because overcautiousness is what's causing. Is What's like causing you gust be like okay, took damage long rest. Right, oh, we should probably rest now. Like so, yeah, I mean it definitely has added a lot of time to this campaign, just on the we fought something. Let's go back, and that's a very video gaming mechanic, right, like that's a very oh, you cleared the mobs in one room, you leave you heal up and then you go in and clear the rest of the room, because that's how you normally used to clearing dungeons in any other game, dark souls. All the players are used to playing dark souls. Yeah, it's not like we have like a call of duty go back and pressed at the bonfire. Yeah, it's like we have a call of duty enemy spawner, right, that maybe that's what I'll have to do, like only infernal dungeons from here on out, with infernal rifts that constantly spawn demons. That's right, not about. Well, it also in negates the impact of exhaustion because, like, if you rest after every single encounter, exhaustion doesn't do anything to you. You just are constantly negating it. That's when we went back and made the fires below. That's why I really like the mechanic that we include a word. It's like, yeah, if you long rest in this dungeon, you don't lose exhaustion. You gain all the benefits of a long rest, but you don't lose exhaustion. You actually gain more exhaustion because you're just constantly breathing in smoke. Yeah, and it's a small little determ, right, because it does give that? Does give your players that sort of risk reward on that long rest? Like do we want to have full hp but then we have but then have disadvantage on all skill checks? Yeah, the one thing that my players did in that fires below braining was they exited the dungeon for their long rest. Then they would have I mean, like there's also the time crunch. They probably should have lost the down at that point. Yeah,...

I mean it was difficult to yeah, to kind of difficult thing it was. It was, it was. Yeah, it's a it's such a hard thing to implement. For sure. It's it comes in a player choice. My thing is that if a module ends with the players losing because the DM pulled some crap, like if I come in and I'm dropping CR thirteen dragons on a level ten party, that's dumb. Yeah, and I would expect the players to be pretty ticked off with me at the end of that counter because that's just stupid. If they are walking in it as a level ten party. Two one see our thirteen dragon a doable thing and of ruined whatever parties. That can be doable. But they approach it completely wrong. Not completely wrong, but if they take like every risk. They blow everything right away against this thing. They have nothing left at the tank at the end there they're, you know, just not even trying to dodge out of the way of its attacks and then at the end they lose. I'm washing my hands at that. That is players autonomy. Yeah, it's true, it's a tough thing to do, but it's an no. See Our difference. See Our difference is something that I think at earlier levels it's much more difficult to implement. Like if you put in a CR four creature against the Level One party, you know that's that's a three CR difference, but there's a good chance at that level four monster is going to one shot people. So it's a lot different. It's a lot different than the level ten party that's now facing off against the level thirteen thing or a see our thirteen creature, where that's actually doable because they've got hip points, they've got magical items, they've got, you know, resources that they can expend to make it a bit more of a fair fight. So yes, be aware of that. Last thing I want to talk about here. There's this last little bit on fun combat encounters and then I'll let you take over a Bradin, because we are running short on timing. We're over now, ten minutes into this already. Great, so I'll just quickly finish this up here and then we'll move on. So the following features can add more fun and suspense to the combat encounter. Terrain features that pose inherit risks to both the characters and their enemies, such as a freed rope bridge or pools of green slime. There are terrain features that provide a change of elevation, such as pits, stacks, so then empty crates, ledges and balconies. Features that either inspire or for characters and their enemies to move around, such as chandeliers, cakes of gunpowder or oil or and whirling blade traps. There's also enemies that are in hard to reach locations or defensive positions, so that characters who are normally attack at range are forced to move around the battlefield. And then there's different types of monsters working together. Is another fun way to create a combat encounter. So brain and take her away. Next time we will pick up with random encounters. All Right, I'm not even going to jump into is at second today. We're just going to go straight to talk at the town, because the question of the day is, what is your favorite terrain that you like to run in encounter, in branching off from the favorite terrain of the ranger, obviously, yeah, what is your favorite setting that you like to set in? Do you prefer them to be in a town, in jungle and a forest, mountainous? Interesting? Interesting, I've really we've been in a force for like the last year and a half and I really want to get out of a force. What, how dare you? Yeah, yeah, I get that. It's it's almost like favorite terrain is the one I haven't used very much yet. I'm using a lot of Arctic stuff in my wild mount campaign because they're up in the grain wilds and Isele Cross. So it's it's been really fun because I haven't done like an Arctic themed adventure before, or not very often. So it's been really cool that way. But it is starting to get to the point where it's like, okay, Yep, they are in the Arctic all the time. There's cold, then there's you know with thin nice areas and stuff like that. But I'm like, Oh, I want to implement some other cooler, you know, mechanics that I can that I can throw at them. So I I like, I think Arctic is a really fun it is a really fun like setting terrain. So...

I would say that's it is probably my favorite because it has to do with like remaining warm enough, like the players have to like try and do that kind of thing. They, you know, might take exhaustion points if they're not able to do that. It also implements things like thin ice or avalanches or whatever along those lines that can like really improve combat encounters and traveling just in general. But see, setting is also really cool, like being pirates is awesome, so I want to do that too. So that's I don't know, it's hard. It's hard to choose, Braten, why you make me do this? Could well, this is why you gotta think, Carlos. So I've really only been in the dense jungle dming for the last little while. So I guess one one setting that I really want to explore, and I have a bunch of ideas for, is a desert setting. Yeah, sand storms, Mirage's sand started, mirages, shifting landscape, heat wave of fun. Yeah, that sounds think holes. Oh yeah, Killum, shanty, call Um. Chance Setting for V would be, yes, sexic that's a that's for me. I don't know what Moss like. It would be interesting and I think, I think it's such a dramatic contrast to what I've been running for the last little bit and that's why I attracts me the most, because of dramatic everything. There's no real setting like a desert, I mean yeah, I mean, there's no real city, like a city either, and like really the like. All these things are pretty unique on their own in the sense. Yeah, so it doesn't would be cool and I think, I mean I've always been intrigued about like a seafaring campaign as well. Yeah, I think just in general, with the Group of lads that we normally play with, you guys are often doing some sea shanties and escapades and other pioty games. So I think that that would be a very easy thing to adapt and have it welcome and be received well with the group, for sure. I think fortresses are another cool one that I haven't done very often because it adds like a whole like defensive and or siege, you know, kind of idea to this whole thing. There's lots of places you can like try and climb up or maybe you go underneath or like, you know, how do you get through the gates? How do you get into these different areas? There's lots of elevation and like places for people to hide and take cover and lots of like combat oriented strategy stuff that you can implement in that kind of a situation, where in a desert it is a lot more difficult to implement. You know, cover in a desert as a as something that can happen it. You might be able to find places to hide underneath the sand or something like that, but I'm not sure if that counts is cover. It's different. So I like the Arctic setting, but I do want to bring in like different settings just to change up the different combat encounters that the players face off it. Right. What about you? Very mine is mine is naval, a SE's? Yeah, I'm actively working on plentyone right now, a full campaign for when my other campaign is finished. Actively is a Drung tell you like it with your port cane stuff. Yeah, well, that's the thing. Like I didn't set out to do a NA avil thing like you guys. It just when you guys had designed your characters and got them to me, it made the most sense. Like I had this whole world mapped out and then when you sent me them, I was like no, they make some most sense to put them here versus. I was going to start you guys right off in the capital originally, and then, once I got all your characters, he is, I was like now I'm throwing them in this gang ridden port town. And then I think that like the first time that we've R in naval combat there will you guys were like, not naval combat, but combat on a boat where the boat itself was a factor. That was a ton of fun. I was like, I want to do a lot more of that. And then, yeah, in addition, we all, a bunch of us, are playing see if these recently. So that's got me back on the back on the end of the naval stuff. And I've also, you guys know, like I try incorporate like a decent amount of horror into my campaign. I'm a big horror fan and nothing scares the crap out of me more than the open ocean, it's true, absolutely terrified. cripperrant coupling PHILOSOPHOBIA. So the things that I can do with this are going to be a lot of fun. But let's take a look at the responses that we got, because we got a lot of responses this week. So, looking first over at the discord,...

...we got hex coming in campaigns, I tend towards forgotten realms because they're a bunch of different environments and terrains to choose from. We went with a realm versus a terrain here encounters, I tend towards cavernous or underground ruins as being my favorite, mostly because as a DM and challenges players to act within confines and makes tradiction traditional tactics in effective. It gets them thinking on their feet. I like that. Taking a look of and find quarters as good. Yeah, for sure. Taking a look at our twitter, I'd post kind of a couple of examples, like city, forest, mountain, etc. At Queen o'ryan Jay says. I kind of want to say all of them, but so far only a couple of in mountain of forest. I love the city, but it's better for campaign at times because it makes the players established connections with the world around them. That's very true. If you're trying to get them like immediately connected to the world, a city's a good place because it gets them interacting with NPCs and learning a lot. Yep, or sure, at gaming. Three hundred and six says the wild West has been fun recently. So I kind of followed up on that. I was wondering if he was playing V or if he was playing like something like a on deadwood. Yeah, said he said. NOPE, we're playing. We're playing five. He's just playing in a homebrew world where they're currently kind of in a not a desert setting like Carlos is talked about, but more like Arizona Texas, like right down to the saloons and the dry and sheriff. Yeah, it sounds like a lot of fun. You've got at TT journeys. The one that I am writing now takes place in a remote mining village where Shenanigan's are afoot far away from the relatively cosmopolitan section of the world, think the outer districts of the Hunger Games. Besides that, they just like to run episodes in a bottle, so like remote island or something like that. Just one office. And I like that though. Like the idea that the it's city but it's not city, it's city removed from city. That's pretty cool. Yeah, very interesting. And then we've got two very contrasting tweets back to back. We've got at Az Al All all Brinter, as Alumbrooke Albrinter. Sorry if I'm mispronouncing that. Cities for the whole political and legal drama. Nothing like a good mystery below the ground or criminal syndicates. Hey, you should check out the Royal City Society. One shot. The who its name is escaping me right now, even though I wrote it. The perfect crime. That's a good one. Yes, yeah, check it out you you'd like that. Then we've got at dice average Jack Coming in. Big cities are good fun for one shots, but they can becomebersome and long campaigns in less handled right. In the past I've done it both very well and very poorly, and it really shows. Yeah, HMM, yeah, agree. Cities can just get really messy, can get really bading to like there's it sounds weird. Is a city is kind of like ever. It's all one, but it's it's option. You give option paralysis to your players. Choice paralysis is your players. A lot of times it's cities. Yeah, yeah, there's too much, but also not enough. That's like, Oh, yes, we have to go this way. It's more like Oh, but there's a there's a little bit over there, there's a little bit over there, there's what about that? You know what's Damn this way? I don't know. We've never been that way before. I guess we could go that way too. I don't yeah too much, I think. I think I'm right. Gotta Start, I be. I agree. I think what I got to start doing with cities is like the session before being like hey, you're getting to the sea. What are a couple of things that you want to do in the city? That we don't get to it like in the moment it's like what do you want to do? And everybody's like, I don't know too much. Yeah, yeah, for sure. Having the players think in advance as to like what they want out of like what they want to do, is something I've been doing a lot as well, just so I can be prepared to you know, it's super important for them, so that they're like, oh well, we'll probably go and do this, like we'll think about that. Now I can be like okay, so I'll flesh out this NPC more thoroughly. I'll, you know, do this kind of thing, or I can throw this encounter at them probably or whatever. You know, so I can, I can get really like prepared for whatever it is that they're planning on doing directly next. So yeah, definitely would recommend ten to ten. Talk to your players, all right, but I think that that does it for today's episode of triple advantage. If you like what you're here and stick around for more. We're coming out with new episodes every Monday. Keep it locked on our twitter at Royal City social or Instagram at Royal City Society, and our community discord, which can be found...

...at either. We're discussing every week questions like you heard on today's talk of the town we discuss. I gotta say, Yes, I'm so happy with the interactions that we've been getting on the discard. Let I really have it's really it's really fun to see everybody just starting to chat and use the general looks as as intended. We gotta we got community member Hex two's been proble. I think it was our first person that we don't know that join the discord. Great Text. Yes, he's he started up a thing that he's doing where he's a he's got that dtenzero wild magic roll table that we talked about last week. So he's rolling every day. And posting a result of what today's wild magic search of the day is. So that's been really watching. That's been cousin. It's been really fun seeing. It's been really fun seeing how everybody else is like Dming, like how else, how people would like run these house rules and stuff and how they would adapt these into their own games at conversation. Make sure you I'll check it out and join it for sure. Definitely check that out and, besides that, keep it locked here and we will see you next week.

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