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Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 1, Episode 1 · 1 year ago

Ep. 1 - Divining the DMG

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Welcome to our new pet project, Triple Advantage, a podcast made because as DMs we look for any excuses to continue talking about our favourite hobby. 

You pretend to rummage through thenotes you don't have beyond the screen. You see five faces. Looking back at youwaiting for some expesition. Looking down, you see D Twentis one! Notwo! Do you give a triple advantage, hey DM? Who is that, guy that we metthe other day? I can't remember his name, but he seemed important. You don't remember his name either it's Mike nothat! Wasn't it? No, I'm pretty sure it's Mike! No! No,it was. I think it was Dexter, the pressures building everyone'sstaring at you. If you feel a beat of sweat start forming on your temple. What do you do well for the next little while you canlisten to triple advantage, our brand new podcast, this podcast is brought to you by theRoyal City Society, a group of DM's that realize we don't actually know thefull rule set, and so we've decided to start reading the dungeon master'sguide from front to back. We figured this would lead to some good discussionand decided to make a podcast out of it new year new content. Today we will bereading about the dungeon master. How to use this book and how to know yourplayers? My name is Carlos and with me, is Bradnand Jordan without Ferder Adeu, let's jump intothe First Section of the introduction, Britain all right. The First Section of theintroduction that we're going to be looking at today is the dungeon master.I'm going to start by reading. These guys are going to periodically jump inwith some thoughts on what we're reading so the dungeon master sometimes knows the DM is the creativeforce behind a D, an D game. The DM creates a world for the other player toexplore and also creates and runs adventures to drive the story. Anadventure typically hinges on the successful completion of a quest andcan be as short as a single game session. Longer Adventures might embrowplayers in Greativ conflicts. Ther require multiple game sessions toresolve when struwng together these adventures form an ongoing campaign. ADan d campaign can include dozens of adventures and Calasto for months oryears M. I just realized this a side bar comment,but I hope just blatantly reading the dudgeon master's guide is not a breachof copyrighted material. Ideally we're adding this as a reaction podcast. Weare a reaction podcast for all legal cases, given that our entire idea hinges onthe use of this book. Let's hope that this doesn't get taken down afterepisode, one play right, Caria, Ow, wo. You want to quickly sideBar this to say I find a hilarious adnd campaign can include duses ofadventures last for months or a year takes months or a years to play twosessions. Sometimes yes, I yeah honestly for the most part, your running sessions for all of threeweeks and, like that's part of the engagement thatyou' like try to improve on right, because initially this is so far beyond scope of any newdungeon master. Like a year long campaign, Cheez, yeah, nokay right, a dungeon master, gets to wear manyhats as the architect of a campaign. The DM creates adventures by placingmonsters, traps and treasures for other players, characters the adventurers todiscover as a storyteller. The DM helps the other players visualized. What ishappening around them improvising when the adventurers do something or gosomewhere unexpected as an actor. The DM plays the rules of the monsters andsupporting characters, breathing life into them and, as a referee, the DMinterprets the rules and decides when to abide by them and went to challengethem. Yeah I've always found like...

...that part to be pretty overwhelming. Idon't know about you guys, but like when I first started. I was likethere's no way I'm going to play as a DM there's way too much to do. I think,especially now I mean we're certainly jumping ou tothis band wagon of tend content a little bit into its maturity, but with critical role and other great dmsbeing displayed on screen. You definitely do feel that, becauseusually it's groups of friends that are watching these shows that are gettinginto the game right. So it's a little for me. I felt like there was already abar, even though I hadn't actually played with any of you guys before Ihadn't even demmed anything before it would be the first time. I'm doingsomething because you're, seeing how great other people are doing it, it's alittle bit daunting and it takes a little. At least it took me a littlewhile to get used to being okay with not being in control ofthe situation. Kind of, like the other DM's seem to be at least on stream yeah. It's definitely daunting to live in aworld where you're constantly, if you're doing this you're constantlybeing compared to the that mercers and the Maccovilles of the world, becausethat's just those guys are in a League of their own. That's not a bar that wecan realistically hope to hit as close as we want to come to. That is important to just make it your on. Iguess is the point yeah for sure: Don't try and be what other people want you to be dowhat you want to do, and hopefully other people will come along for thatright or you know they're in your immediategroup of friends, and they really can't not show up, because guys come on we'veknown each other for years, going to keep sliding into yourmessages. Until you come to my house. Come on guys, we got a session inventing writing storytellingimprovising, acting referene every DM handles these rules differently andyou'll probably enjoy some more than the others. It helps to remember thatdungeons and dragons is a hobby and being that DM should be fun, focus onthe aspects you enjoy and down play the rest. For example, if you don't likecreating your own adventures, you can use bublish ones. You can also lean onthe other players to help you with the rule masteries and the world building quick side Bar on that look for published adventures. TheRoyal City Society is looking to expand their repertor of homebrew content tomake sure to check back in on US wee working on stuff constantly and we'llbe releasing it. Alongside this podcast Hashtak shamelet's, Pluk Hoshold, I gad hi, is sponsored by us. You get whatyou get. The DND rules help you and the otherplayers have a good time, but the rules aren't in charge, you're the DM, andyou are in charge of the game. That said, you goal isn't to slaughter theadventurers, but to create a campaign world that revolves around theiractions and decisions and to keep your players coming back for more if you'relucky. The events of your campaign will echo in the memories of your players.Long after the final game session is concluded. That thing, you said, definitely don'tbe afraid to kill your players. I mean yeah. That's definitely something thatI am always afraid of is ending the game too soon right making an accounter.That's too difficult. Everybody dies ind, Oh shit, well time to reroll guys yeah. I don'tthink any of the three of us have had a TPK, yet total PARTICO, but no Weh've, all, I think, killedplayers, Carlos actually carless killed me. I was your first kill H. that'sright s! Get that Si. It wasn't even my fault. I give the entire part of theoption not to kill you solutely no, and we all chose to kill you, and that wasA. I was okay with that. That was a solid, a solid event that continues to yeah good sy Bar. There make sure yourplayers know that it's okay for your for their character to die yeah. Ifyou're, if you're going to kill your...

...player characters, don't don't beaddick about it for sure, and on top of that, th thatlittle peregrap tistion on two things yeah. I do definitely have to agree.The events of the campaign do ECCO in the memories, but what I found is thatthis is rarely in combat a lot of the Times. Something cool will happen incombat that your players do remember but often times it's actually thedowntime. It's when you're trying to add that RPG element you're trying toadd that role playing into the game, you're,focusing really on the roll playing part of it, and that's usually, when Ifound a lot of players get the most out of it or it's just some stupid shitthat they pull in combat as well. Had A player recently jump off a cliffto try to grap AA flying creature and they both flummeted for the GROSD sofun it was epic, but you know Briswor Ward, guys. Risk rewards good times how to O use this book. This book isorganized in three parts. The first part helps you decide what kind ofcampaign you'd like to run. The second part helps you create the adventures orthe stories that will compose the campaign and keep the playersentertained from one game session to the next. The last part helps you adudicate, the game, the rule of the game and modify them to suit the styleof your campaign, and I think this is probably why most of us, andprobably anybody most of the people listening haven't read the entire DMG.Is that it's so versatile and it's so spanning everything that a lot ofpeople just kind of flip through find it specifically what they need. I knowthat's what I do I'll flip to one section and I'll go: okay, that's goodto know, and then I'll put it back on the shelf until the next time. I needit. Yeah Yeah, there's absolutely no good reason to do exactly what we'redoing. I mean most of the time you can begin to play the game even as a DM.Just after reading the players handbook just make sure you do that. There'stons of Reser S, it online tons of content already being published on theplayers handbook itself, but that's definitely something that can help yousort of ramp up to know what your players can do and I think that's kindof what helps you that the most is a DM is once you fully understand what acharacter can physically no do in your setting, really helps you set theboundaries and set the setting of where they play. I mean you're, not plaing,shifting at level three, so you can definitely create more tighterencounters and different events that your players can't just simply run awayfrom alright. So the first part of the DMG is referred to is the master ofworlds ever DM is the creator of his or her own campaign world, whether youinvent a world adapt a world from a movier novel Reas, a published settingfor the Dindy game. You make your world your own over the course of thecampaign. The world where you set your campaign is one of countless worlds tomake up the D and multivers Av astery of plains and worlds where adventureshappen. Even if you're using an establish world such as the forgottenrealms, your campaign takes place in sort of a mirror universe of theofficial setting with the forgotten, realms novels game products and theDigital Games are assoumed to take place. The world is yours, change asyou see fit, and you are to modify as you explore the consequences of theplayer's actions. Your world is more than just a backdrop for adventureslike Middle Earth, West erose and countless other fantasy worlds outthere. It's a place which you can escape and witness fantastic stories.onfault a well designed and well run universe seems to flow around theadventures so that they feel part of something instead of a part from it.Personally, I tend to adapt characters and settings from the books and anime that I like to readjust certain things that I'd like to see change in a fantasy concept or evenlike a hybrid of certain characters. Right like what, if you have someonelike John Snow, that can, I don't know, cast fireballs changes that it wouldchange in my head. It changes the how the character interact with the worldand that's what gets me excited about...

...creating new mpcs, it's just figuringup. Okay, I'm going to change this personality trade on this alreadyestablished character and just set them free in this manageen world of mind what they do and how they interact witheverything else, at least in Partd, as at DM, is really exciting. To me, I agree what, if the punisher had apowerful, demonic patron backing him and the powers to do what he wanted todo? Oh Shit, yeah exactly one of my favorite characters. Consistency is a key to a believablefictional world. When the adventurers go back in town for supplies, theyshouldnt encounter the same nonplayer characters or NPCs thot. They metbefore soon. Thoy learn the BARKEEP's name,and here she will remember there is as well once you've achieved this degreeof consistency. You can provide an occasional change if the adventurerscome back to buy more horses at the stables, they might discover. The manwho ran the place went back home to the large city over the hills, and now it'shis niece running the family business that sort of change when that hasnothing to do with adventures directly, but one that they'll notice mak theplayers feel as though the characters are part of a living world that changesand grows along with them. That's a really good point yeah, I think definitely reading the DMG comes inhandy right about now, because this is something that I discovered much later on, just having recurringplayers or recurring characters within your world with new information about the outsidespace. Like anything, that's not within what the players are currently able tosee or communicate with. I think that's something that at least when running tomove annihilation. I've started doing that a lot more with NPCs that theplayers can now contact again you're getting to these levels,where you have spells that have a farother reach. So you got to keep that up right. There's!No! There's! No way that a player isn't going to ask about or use he sendingstone that there's no way that a player isn't going to use a sending stone thatyou gave to them. So now, that's something that you have to factor intoyour campaign and that information is something that that MPC needs to haveso part. One of this book is All about inventing your world chapter, one askwhat type of game you want O run. It helps you nail down a few importantdetails about the world in the overging conflixt. In it chapter two helps youput the world in greater contexts of the multiverse expanding on theinformation THAs presented in the players handbook to discuss the planesof existence in the Gods and how you can put them together to serve theneeds. Your campaign- maybe this seems obvious. It mentionsthe players handbook here. If you don't have a player's handbook, please getone yeah, absolutely for your own sake. For the sake of everybody in your group,please get a player's handbook if you plan on playing this, if you're, Tu,Saket, think of your dms Y. think of your dams, if you're just trying it outsure, maybe borrowing a friends sure maybe finding a version online. Ifyou're planning on making this your hobby consider making the investment it makesit easier on yourself, it makes it easier on your players on your DM would strongly recommend whether youwrite your own adventures or use the published ones expect to invest preparation time beyond the hours youspend at the gaming table, you'll need to carve out some free time to exerciseyour creativity, as you invent compelling plots, new N, PCS, craftencounters and think of clever ways to foreshadow story. Events yet to cop part. Two of this book is dedicated tohelp you create and run great adventures. Chapter three covers thebasic elements of a dinde adventure and Chapter Four Helps Create Memorable andpcs chapter five presents guidelines and advice for running adventures,Cetin Dungeons in the Wilderness and other locals and chapter six covers the time betweenadventures, Chapter Seven's, all about treasure, magic items and specialrewards that helpd the players invested in your campaign...

...now mind you as an audience. Please beaware that all of these sections will take quite a couple of weeks to get to so we will slowly be releasing content on a semi, consistent schedule,hopefully at least initially, once we get up to speed, we might beable to record more and more of these episodes and get to that juice.Yorducer content sooner on the note of that first part, though, the free time that you need to spend to prep definitely important highlyrecommended, but one thing that this doesn't touch on is how you exercise your creative muscles.When you have to improve everything, do note that does not matter it does notmatter how long you think you prepped your players willfind they will find a crack in your story.They will find the thing you didn't think about you gotta understand thatthis is five different brains, hat think completely different as thesituation that you're describing. If you, if you want to have more control, I actuallysuggest being more descriptive like really really drilling down what thesetting is like, because if you don't paint that picture well enough, yourplayers are just going to interpret way more on their own yeah. Then youcould possibly possibly encapsulate and there's alwaysgoing to be that player who's going to be like. I don't really care what thedescription is. I'm just going to go off to the right over there yeah so forno reason, so just be impro, impropism and PROB has definitely improved in mesince I began Dmin just with trying to recollect information that I might havethrown out loosely just in general, with new interactions that I thoughtplayers might not have aright so part three of the DMG is the master of rules.Dungeons and dragons isn't a head to head competition, but it needs someonewho's impartial, yet involved in the game to guarantee that everybody at thetable playsd by the rules as the players who create the game world andthe adventurers who take place in it. The DM is a natural fit to take on thereferee rule as a referee, the DM acts as a mediatorbetween the rules and the player a player tells the DM what heor shewants to do and the DM determines whether it's successful or not, in somecases, asking the player to make a die role to determined success. For example,if a player wants his or hoard character to take a swing in an Orce,you say make an attack rule while looking up the ORK Sarmer class, the rules don't account for everypossible situation that might arise during a typical D, an Dsession, forexample, a player might want his or her character to hur labrasier BrisirBrasor HM Prozer is definitely not the right word. Yeah, that's something else. A breaze Yor full of hot cools into themonster's face. How you determine the outcome of this action is up to you,but tell the player to make a strength check while mentally setting thedifficulty class or DC at a fifteen. If the strength check is successful, thendetermine how a faceful of hot coals affects the monsters. You might decidethat it deals one de for fire damage and imposes disvantage on the monster'sattackroles into the end of its next turn. You roll the damage dice or letthe players do it and the game continues. Difficulty class is a DM's,invisible wall, use it hm yeah, absolutely, actually it becausethere's always going to be one of those players who want to do somethingcompletely ridiculous, at's somthing about being completely ridiculous. Ithink that it's just I don't want to helm and drive this story, but there isa story and being in a store for seventeen hours, doesn't progress it. Ithink, as a DM, is your job to sort of...

...push your players and start getting theball rolling on the story. So, if they're trying to do certain checksover and over again or if there's a certain area that you might not haveyet fully fleshed out or a story element that they're not supposed todiscover just yet set a difficulty class, that's rather high now mind you. It can be through the stroke of luck that yourplayers do get there, but that's part of the fun. I think that's it's the acceptance of at least youknow if you've set something up to a point where you're putting adifferenbuilty class that they can succeed, you're at least a little bitready to get them to interact with that encounter yeah. Sometimes mediaing therules mean setting limits. If a player tells you I want to run up and attackthe York, but the character doesn't have enough movement speed to reach theork. You say it's too far away to move up and stell attack. What would youlike to do? Instead? The clayer takes the information. It comes up with adifferent plan to referee the rules. You need to know them. You don't haveto memorize this book or the player's Handbook, but you should have a clearidea of their contents so that when a situation requires a ruling, you knowwhere to find the proper reference. The player's hand book contains themain rules you need to play the game part. Three of this book offers awealth of information to help you dudicate the rules in a wide variety ofsituations. Chapter eight presents advice for using attack, rules, ability,checks and saving throws. It also includes operations, options, sorryappropriate for certain playstyles and campaigns, including guidelines forusing miniatures a system for handling chase scenes and rules for madness. Oididn't know that gone back to that. If you'd like to create your own stuff,such as new monsters, races and character backgrounds, chapter nineshows you hewl. This chapter also contains optional rules for unusualsituations or playstyles, such as firearms, in a fantasy setting and asan audience if you'd like to chime in on any of this conversation or have any points or comments to make about Wwe're talking about, feel free to join the discussion, we'll be posting on ourinstagram page, I believe, simply search Royal City Society and weshould be there Kno your players and for me this is the most importantsection. So I'm excited to talk about this. The success of a DND game hingeson your ability to entertain other players at the game table, whereastheir rule is to create characters. The protaganists in the campaign breathelife into them and help steer the campaign into the through theircharacters. Actions your rule is to keep the platers and yourselfinterested in a mersed in the world that you've created and let thecharacters do awesome things knowing what your players enjoy most about theD nd game helps you create and run adventures that they will enjoy andremember once you know which of the following activities. Each player inthe group enjoys the most. You can tail or adventures that satisfy your playerspreferences as much as possible, thus keeping them engaged yeah absolutelymean specifically in my home games. I know that, for the most part, all ofthe players in it come back from like a board game background or a strategygame background. So I know that a lot of combat encounters are usually prettywelcome because it does get that layout on the board and you get to put yourminnies out and you get to sort of have that board game feel again. With that in mind, though, it's it'sone of the things that, when you're trying to introduce more role playingelements to players that have just been playing more strategy games, it can be a littlebit more difficult to get them engaged in that. In that aspect of that thataspect of the game, I think one of the most important points in that section.There was where it says you, as the DM are supposed to get thecharacters to do awesome things right, so it comes down to what the charactersdo and you as the DM. Your main job is to just let them do these awesomethings, and by doing that, you are also...

...doing these awesome things with themand that's the like fun of the game right all right. So the First Section it'sgot here is acting players who enjoy acting like getting into character andspeaking in their characters, voices role, players at heart enjoy socialinteractions with mpcs monsters and their fellow party members engageplayers who like acting by giving them opportunities to develop theircharacters, personality and backgrounds, allowing them to interact regularlywith mpcs, adding rule playing elements to combat encounters and incorporatingelements from their characters. Backgrounds into your adventures.That's a really fun. Part of the game I find is when your background starts tocome into play and you're like. I remember this. For My background, Ithink hit's a lot easier to do when you're doing homebrew campaigns so whenyou're doing homebre content for sure, but, for example, again running Tomyou're in Ritolt, for the majority of it so sure a players background, maybeif they're from the area could play a huge part of it, but I've found that,for the most part, the characters are creating city folk or someone thatisn't necessarily part of the jungle. Maybe that was my fault as a DM for notintroducing the option to do so, and that's something that again you'reconstantly going to be thinking back and you're constantly going to belooking at the things that you could be doing better and maybes. For me, at least for me, it'sit's good to just iterate on it and then allow them to you know, createcharacters that are more immediately involved with their surroundings, ormaybe they just know iside character or an MPC already and incorporate thatinto their Bote, actually didn't think tha Bou thet, so if they go back to thecity or whatever they feer like hey, I remember this guy yeah. I guess it'shard. I guess it's hard in that sense, because for the campain that I started,we made the characters beforehand andthey've all sort of been there since the beginning. I didn't think of that'sit's kind of hard to introduce that now, but that's yeah consider for the future yeah- and I know especially for thispart like act. This is what I love about the game. I love like gettinginside that player or inside that character and like getting in their skin and becoming themlike. This is why I come to the stable, so I can bee this person for three hours or so so something new I'm about to try is knowing one of the other players like and and their background as well. Soboth of us are part of each other's backgrounds, so we can have that, likerole play, Opportunity right off the fat, it's interesting. I've always beeninterested to see how that works. So let me know how that goes. I will exploring players who desireexploration want to experience the wonders that a fantasy world has tooffer. They want to know what's around the next corner or Hill. They also liketo find hidden clues and treasure engage players who like exploration bydropping clues. That hinted things yet to come, letting them find things whenthey take the time to explore, providing rich descriptions of excitingenvironments and using interesting mats and props and giving monstrus secretsto uncover or cultural details to learn. I love doing this. I love I mean evenas players that might not enjoy exploration. That's part of the reasonthat I like theamming is, I love expanding the world and I mean, ifyou've read anything about the forgotten realms. You know it's lostcities on top of lost cities on top of law cities, the the limits of what canbe placed in the world are almost endless. So that's one of the thingsthat I really like adding to it, and especially because I'm looking tocontinue this campaign further. If players are interested, obviously- andI mean they can't just be in this bubble- the entire time Andall of asudden wait. What there's a world outside of here there's, certainlycampaign element that have introduced that may have nothing to do with the current tast that they're on, butif they go back to it, that's something that we can definitely explore, and I think you just made a great point.This sections talk specifically about knowing your players and doing whatthey want to do, make sure you're doing what you want to do as well. You'rehere you're an active participant as...

...part of this game. There's got to be something in it for you beyond, justbeing the referee and that's true, yeah rules, master of this game m instigating players who lect toinstigate action, are eager to make things happen, even if it means takingperilous risks, they would rather rush headlong into danger and face theconsequences than facebordom engage players who like to instigate byallowing them to affect their surroundings, including things in youradventures that tempt them letting their actions put the characters in atight spot and including encounters with NPCs who are as feisty andunpredictable as they are. The temptation is really key here. I find that any time you describesomething to more with more detail than yourprevious description players will latch onto it. I think it takes time for players torealize this might just be a longer description and not necessarily met a game into thinking that it hassome more importance, and that does really help out later on when you'retrying to introduce elements that could be important, that your players lookover. So you want to introduce something, butyou might not want to make it so obvious as it being important, but Idon't know it's for me: It's been sort of yeah, it's like a Dobni game. Yeah,like you, see the shiningness around the object and it's wo. It's got ayellow, glow and everybody's like it's definitely a clue right, a I mean, Cerraly, there's other playersthat will just touch everything, also just being walking a room, investigateyou're in someone's random home, like you're in some random persons, HomeDoin, I'm investigating you just met them. Yeah, I'minvestigating. Okay, there is a there's, a great article,Dan Dbion, just published a couple days ago about this. It's by their dungeonmaster humorist, whose name escapes me He's brilliant. I love reading hisstuff, but he's createdia list of textblocks to read for that player that,like always, has to investigate everything. So, for example, if theyrull in that twenty on investigating just a regular wooden door, it's a fullbackground description of the door and the tree that the door came from andhow long it took to get the contos of the doorus secure the secure the lockon to the door and then in the end. Yes, it opens and it's a door they check for traps, though Oh yeah,that's important, or were they just looking at the door? Looking AP thedoor because sometimes they're just looking at the door and then they alsowant to investigate the door after and just got to catch those players like?No, you can't know you failed the investigation check once you don't getto do it again, but I didn't say, investigates when I SAI h. You know all right: fighting players who enjoyfantasy, combat like kaking the tar out of villains and monsters. They look forany excuse to start afiht favoring, bold action over careful deliberation,engage players who, like fighting by springing, unexpected, combatencounters on them vividly describing the havoc their characters reek withtheir attacks and spells, including combat encounters with large numbers ofweak monsters in interrupting social interaction and exploration with combat. That's probably one of my favoriteparts. Just the encounters are a lot of fun. It's I mean more strategy for me, butyeah I don't know. I certainly love a good encounter as a DM. I really loveplanning it out, but I think I still need to improve on how I keep the flowof the encounter moving, because I know that at times, part of my enjoyment isseeing everybody's actions, but also you see players disconnected times ifit's been like three turns four turns five turns. Oh now I get to go again. So just keeping a better flow issomething that I'm constantly working on. At least I do. I do enjoyencounters, but they're, not my favorite right now. Just because I don't know it just doesn't feel right.Sometimes it doesn't feel like it's...

...flowing properly. It just feels likeit's. You hit this other way to play dnd, while you're still playing thegame, it's right, a little subsection of it. Now your this little mini gamewithin the game. Maybe that's Ho Ny to think Bou. I don't know I'm stillimproving on that myself anyways. I tend to I'm somebody who really doesn'tlike combat. I don't hate it by any means, but it's definitely probably myleast favorite part. I tend to slice adventures that we do like singlesessions into the combat in the noncombat sections and I always end upenjoying the non combat better. That being said, this one section thatincludes vividly describing the havicg their characters reek with theirattacks and spells as somebody who mans spellcastr classes, describing howo'mcasting the spells and how that looks, is one of my favorite things todo hm yeah for sure optimizing players who enjoy optimizing their characters,capabilities like to find two in their characters for Peke combat performanceby gaining levels, new features and magic items. They welcome anyopportunity to demonstrate their character, superiority, engage playerswho, like optimization, by insuring steady access to new abilities andspells using desire magic items as adventure hooks include encounters thatlet their characters shine and providing quantifiable rewards. Likeexperience points for non combat counters, I haven't never usedexperience points and I NATO campaigns- it's always been milestone. I thinkthat's the kind of the new trend, because it's a little bit more fastpaced and it doesn't feel like you have to go out and grind in order to progress in the story and progress as acharacter. You know so I'm sure we'll get into this later,but for new DM's. Listening the background on that is there'sessentially two different ways that most people run campaigns. The first one is experiencepoints which is more similar to a traditional tabletop or online rbjesusm, which iseach thing that you do has a certain number of experience points associatedwith it. Those experience points stack up and eventually contribute to wards. Well levelling up, thank you, but the other option is milestone andmilestone is more akin to you've accomplished this great thing.Congratulations: This with fantastic feet has help you to level up, and it'sa little more vague and a little less mor reliable yeah. Then then, the XBsystem I do prefer milestone. I think all three of US use malstone system asfar as I'm aware yeah the things that one thing that I really want to getaway from, and it's something that I got sucked into with RPT Games is thatif I want to make my character stronger, I can train, but I find that when I'mplaying a game, I don't mind grinding, but at the same time I know that withfive people at the table, one player shouldn't be able to dictate hey we'regoing to go into the forest and kill wolves for the next three days to levelup right to me that doesn't play well into thestory aspect of the game. So I try to avoid that. For that reason I do likewhat it says there, though, if you are using experience points ad in thingsfor persuading people, for instance, give experience points for successfullypersuading someone to give you a margain. Give th experience points forspending your downtime doing pushups. I don't know, like just add in little things that you can dohere and there it it makes it. I guess maybe maybe moreis definitely more beneficially if you incentivize your players to continuallythink of new things. Yeah, because I do. I do see av sort of forsee certainplayers, maybe just falling into pitfall every night, I'm just going todo my pushups and maybe that plays into the longer part of the campain. I don'tknow these are things that I'm not really rig considering myself ut, but Ilike to sort of keep the story sort of rolling in mypersonal for sure games. I don't know...

...the more, I think about it, the more itmakes sense but yeah, I don T, know a new one charted territory for me.Maybe we'll try that one day, maybe problem solving players who want tosolve problems like to scrutinize NPC motivations on table, labillains andmachinations salt puzzles and come up with plans. I'm going to incen checkinside check that I don't know rol. Let's see continue ah engaged players who like to solveproblems by including encounters that emphasize problem solving rewardingplanning and tactics within game benefits, occasionally allowing a smartplan to grant an easy win for the players and creating mpcs with complexmotives. Yeah, I'm going to inside check that one too. You feel I might be really on the nose here, butI think that that's one of the things that problem solving tends to fallunder and I've tried to get better atdescribing inside checks because they are not a lie. Detector no insidetecture are not lie, detectors and I think a lot of players use them as liedetectors. Most people can't tell when people arelying, t doesn't matter who you are you're completely right, but there aredefinitely other opportunities to flex problem solving in stories. Besides,just inside checks, forob, I have a friendof mine who dms who was giving me some advice on a home broemodule that apubushawilback and the big thing that he commented on is that kind of startto finish, like you were making checks all the way along, but there was nochallenge like everything was based on your die outcome. He was like what I look for in a module.If I'm going to pick up a module, that's not mine is. I want to see achallenge. I want to see something that the person has written into this. Thatrequires more than just a lucky score of fifteen on the dice like theyactually have to give this thought, and they have to put some work into solvingthis in order to overcome this obstacle. Yeah storytelling players who lovestorytelling want to contribute a narrative to a narrative. They like it when their characters areheavily invested in an unfolding story and the enjoying counters that are tied,T and expand to tie to and expand an overrging plot engage players who, likestorytelling by using their characters backgrounds to help shape the storiesof the campaign, making sure the encounter advances of the story in someway, making their character's actions helpsteer future events and giving MP CS ideals, bonds and flaws that theadventurers can exploit. Yeah absolutely falls in line witheverything I like doing. My campaigns, definitely storytelling and exploring and acting out all. I definitely, Ithink, my three main themes when I tried to introduce new players to a new setting orcontinue to move the the players along in the story thatthey're playing forn and when players are creating characters. Flaws are animportant thing I think was saying there for NPCs as well. If they have ideals and bonds, it kind of tells you about a little bitabout their good character. But if a person has a flaw, it just kind of I don't know boost that character asfar as like who they are and how they can develop, yeah right, yeah sure, andif an MPF players c an NPC kind of develop as well along with them. Itkind of like incorporates them into the group and it makes them yeah. The morgliterertion is reallyreally fun. I think that some of my players like to go throughmany phases of who they are in game. I think we're thinking of I don't knowwho II think we do exactly the same.

Caru guess I know who you are Leoni. We love you buddy, but I know Jordan touched on this a little whileback when we were talking using character backgrounds to helpshape the stories of the campaign. Every player that I know loves it whenyou start to actually build their background into anadventure and they start to see that there might actually be some payoff tothe thought that they put into this character creation and as a DM. I loveseeing that, like I love that they love that. So I do it m yeah. No, I completely agree all right. Well, that's the end of theintroduction, all right, Movieng nown, now to critical thoughtsin this segment. We will discuss new and possibly radical ideas that will may may or may not improve or worse inyour game. On today's critical thoughts, I wanted to discuss the idea ofcreation, so in particular, when you guys are creating new worlds or newcharacters or anything along those lines. How much do you guys draw fromthings that you already know like from famous characters or books or TV series, and how much do you like copy it and how much is too much it's up to? I think your player orpersonally me how much I want to play a certain character. So absolutelysometimes I've watched a marvel movie and Gone Hell Yeah. I want to makeexactly iron man and try to play as close to iron man at's possible. Now II haven't actually done that this is so loose thought, but I've definitely hadthat with some heroes right, like regenerative healing a depool. Can Imake something that's close to. Can I play Deadpool Andnd, I think that'spart of something that is fun for me, although my favorite part is actuallytaking certain traits from different characters that already exist, tryingto combine them together and add my own little flare to it Bratn. What do youthink I got to completely agree? I think we were talking earlier tonightabout a couple of our characters. I hadmentioned: That's my favorite character that I'm playing his name, Zin Fadon.He is a tea flame warlock and he is heavily. I didn't initially make himheavily inspired by the punisher, but that's just kind of how it turnedout. I was developing him developing him and I had all these ideas than heiscomes from this tragic passor. His family's beenkilled and that's why he sought out this revenge- and I remember I broughtthis to you Carlos and you looked at and you went. Oh so he's the funitureand I went oh yeah. He is the punisher, so I feel like, even if you're, notnecessarily planning on including aspects like that's like we're exposedto. We have all these different thingsgoing on that we draw from for references and I feel like evensubconsciously. They can kind of creep into Ora into our designs. So Idon'tnow what to say how much is too much necessarily. I don't go round justblatantly ripping something off, but I think it's impossible to have like a one hundred percentoriginal idea, not impossible, but unlikely. Well, here's the thing I mean like as a DM. I think it's coolto be able to create your own world woild you guy, like. I also think it'sreally cool if we could create something. That's comes from a popularbook or TV series like. Would you create a Westerose and people would be interested inplaying in that world? But, like is that then copyright issues and likesince it just for fun anyway, who...

...really care? I think, when you're tyingto talk, maybe maybe in the scale of where you're playing right. Maybe ifyou're playing at the critical role table beingrecorded, live, you do have to factor in maybe not creating characters oreven using references to characters that are copyrighted because you're inthe same legal space, I would say being a homegame, though I think that all rules are kind of thrown out the window, I'll ripall the music that I want from the Internet. I will get all the illegalresources that I Igi. That's, please don't follow up on this, but I will getevery possible resource that I want to to set the tone of the story that I'mtrying to tell so yeah. If I'm trying to introduce a character that mightjust be Mgiver, it might be fun to sort of create the character ofmacgiber, but not tell your players outright that that's who they areeventually they'll find out through interacting with this NBC or Etcta, andit might create some fun social moment. But I think part of the fun is to justbe able to play whatever you want in whatever world. Obviously, house rulesand considering the like, if you're in Adventureon leage, there's strictconstraints to that, but again at a home game. If someone wants to bring inthe punisher, I think that that's kind of fun yeah. What does the punisherlook like in Westeros? I don't know- I don't know, but that was a really good criticalthought. I mean I think it's something that everybody that starts playing dndkind of considers and it's a nice. It's a nice way to make it easier for you to step into thegame and as a DM, I found myself sort ofdrifting ever so slightly away from then actually getting the hang ofcreating my own content and splicing precreated characters less and lessonto my campaigns per se rigt. But what do you guys think as an an audiencewould love for you guys to send us a DM on Instagram at Royal City Society, andwe can discuss this further we're just setting this up. This is all very newto both us in general. Actually, just mainly us.This is very new. This is a very new domain and we'd love. Some feedbackwould love any input that you guys might have and that's why we're workingin this segment, ed structure, we're just trying to figure out what workshere and what you guys enjoy as an audience so reach out we'd love to hearfrom you guys. This concludes our first episode of triple advantage. Congratsguys we finally got it done. It might be a little lengthy, but again we'llfigure this out as we go, we're looking to release every week, ideally onMondays, I think again well figure this out. Well, let you guys know make sureyou follow us to keep in touch and we'll see you guys next time.

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