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Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 1, Episode 12 · 2 years ago

Ep. 11 - Music and Storytelling

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week on Triple Advantage we discuss Braeden's music, talk a little about making campaigns, and finally discuss the inns and outs of insight and how we like to use them in our campaigns. 

Welcome, welcome, welcome, episode one and eleven of triple advantage. Today, Brindon Jordan are here once again. Is it a cohost? Try host. What do you call this on it's episode eleven, guys, try technical word, for it is a mess. Well, welcome to our mess today, guys, we have some exciting news. Braden cooked up an EP and, just like shadow, released it on the real city society page Britain. Tell us a little bit about the music and your inspiration. Why this genre? So, for those that are unfamiliar, if you don't follow our page, first of all, what are you doing? Start following it. But we have, well, I have released an EP of songs under the name do or care. It is Dungeon synth music, if you're unfamiliar with that. It's a kind of an offshoot of synth music that looks to replicate medieval and medieval style music through Modern Day synth technology. So a bit of a combination between medieval themes and like s John Carpenter type stuff. I am trying a take on this genre where it's equal parts trying to stay true to this original notion of it and also something that is really meant for people who play TTRPG Games, like anybody that, I'm sure of, this to this podcast. So anybody that's looking to inject some music into into their games. So Do you do? You get this music and then just convert it yourself. You're telling me about the person a little bit. How does it work? That really explain the question? Sorry, you're telling me your process on how you come up with these tunes themselves, right, like you take the work and what kind of tools you used to make it. I guess I don't really know too much about it. Nice thing, the Nice thing about Dungeon synth is that it's a genre that's incredibly, incredibly easy to make. So for anybody that is unfamiliar with electronic and Synth music making, all you really need is a digital audio workstation, so something like Ableton or fl studio, something like that. I use a program called mixcraft and you need some kind of a virtual studio technology as Synth, essentially to plug it in so that you're not just pressing a keyboard no sounds coming up. So really all you need is two or three that sound like something that you would find in the medieval era. So some kind of an organ, some kind of a piano, some kind of a string section, maybe drums tend to help. I try to expand a bit more into the the kind of s nostalgia feel, to get a little bit of the Synth side really mixed in with the with the dungeon side. But really, besides that, all you need is something to plug all the music into and some idea for to and even without the tune, you can just bang awaited and eventually something will come on. True. Well, I think the first thing that comes to mind when I was listening to it is bad guy monologs. Joan, have you taken up? I be taking a listener and not yet. Actually, I'm excited to try it out. I've been a little bit busy, but you haven't to get around to it. But yeah, I know it's actually pretty cool that that was the first thing that came to mind to me. It was just this narrator just suddenly got so deep in my voice and started just, you know, going on and on about the toils and troubles about getting this keep and why these intruders are about to die and whatnot. It's really cool. It's a really cool theme. A creatively, a kind of like sparked a little torch in my head. But no, it's really cool and it's getting a really great response to on the page. I didn't even know that there was...

...such a big crowd for dungeons at that. It is a genre that I personally never heard of and I think it's like one of the most popular posts that we have. That actually surprised me a little bit too. I know that dungeon symth is traditionally kind of an offshoot of black metal and the black metal genre kind of injure twining with more modern technology that was available in the s berthing, this kind of new genre, but I also didn't realize that it had such a cult following away from the genre itself. So it's nice to see and actually I've got a lot of personal comment saying like I can't wait to use this in my own DD campaign and I can't wait to try this and see what my players think. So I'm really excited that kind of what I've crafted it for is what it's being used for. War. And if you're in the wrong business, Carlos. Yeah, this writing stuff sucks, man. No, but really low and and it really works like as a background tune for your campaign. As well. Right, and like, especially now that I'm sure all of you are playing more online dnd games, this is great if you have like a bought, because the music itself is inherently loopable. Right. I think you can pretty much have this for certain sections of a game and I would work out really well as well, for sure, for sure. And they're nice long tracks to it, you know, you got to appreciate. Yeah, I will definitely got some more cooking up stuff. Nothing, nothing finished for sure, but a couple things are in the works and will. I mean, who knows how long we're going to be self isolating for. So I could be done another one by the end of next week, because suddenly, just this now, suddenly the dungeons has becomes like the melodies of is your home. Yes, dreary, yet another I pop music. I listen to know which one is your favorite so far. Do you have like names for them? Yeah, he's got the whole album. It's on the band camp. That's I always find. People asking you what your favorite song is is like, I'm sure, asking somebody to choose their favorite child, but you people do have a favorite child, actually exactly, and that's like I know I have one, but I just don't want to admit it because I want to say they're all great. Fair enough, I really like there's one on this EP called Waltz of the wilds, and it was the first time that I really felt like I've taken shots that this genre in the past and nothing's really felt either authentic or like it really clicked, to be honest, like it just wasn't right. And then that was the first one that I made and I was like this, Oh, this actually sounds like not only am I have I got the right idea for what this should sound like, but I'm also just I'm not straight up ripping off everybody have heard in the genre before, like I'm kind of putting my own twist on it and it's it was nice. It was a nice little innovative step for me. I think I like the one. I think it was a by dim torchlight. It was really cool. I think that's what the you have like the the torch sounds at the beginning it. I do. Yes, yeah, that was cool. It was. Is it's easy to picture a tunnel, some dark cavern. You know you're exactly the title is. It's so theme fitting for Games. Yes, and the title. All the titles come post post Song Creation. So I'll make them, I'll listen to them and then whatever I feel like they sound like. Is kind of where on Melch that what I'll watch the title to. That's really cool. Now, are you thinking this is the style? How much play do you have with this? The Genre? It's just so how do I wear this question, sir? Is the new album or is the new songs that you're working on just the same kind of sound? I guess I don't...

...know. This is a weird question. I get what you're saying to a certain extent. I mean, they're they're similar in the sense that's I feel like all the songs on this CP fit a certain esthetic without necessarily sounding exactly the same. I guess you know what. I'm going to interject and I'm going to rephrase my question directly. I think I figured it out. So a lot of these songs here are like Dungeony, darker types. I'm wondering if you're going to do maybe some lighter, more tones, fell like an a light on the Meta. Yeah, yeah, absolutely, that is something that I'm like trying to where the question for a thematic theme for DD, but I think I should just ask it with like. How would sound? I don't know. No, I got what you mean. I that's absolutely something I would love to do. When I'm pulling inspiration, one of the things that I pull from, I mean, you and I, Carlos, both love DM music. I'm not so sure about Jordan, but one of the things that I like to pull from is kind of the softer side of EDM Porter Robinson and Madam and that kind of feel. So I'd like to delve really deeper into that and get kind of more of those those softer, kind of melodic dudes into it instead of just being straight up blaring organs and beating drums and whatnot. Get a get a little bit more nuance in there than what's already in there. HMM, okay, what's exciting them? I think you posted the link for doesn't. By the way, guys, this is an entire EP just released. It's on and it's on our instagram page at Royal City Society, our latest post. You know, we can throw up another story sometime this week and the link will be in that post, so you guys can go check it out. Still still going to work on making that a little bit faster. That's a lot of steps to get to that link. I should get like a linked he or something for the page. Yeah, something like that. Yeeah. But yeah, make sure you guys go check it out. It's really cool. The boss battle music is really inspiring in this one. So I guess with that one and boss battles and Braden yes, everything to say with like yeah, Oh boy, it's that time. Welcome back to our recurring segment divining the DMG, and I am not on twitter. It was never really my style, but Carlos has let me know that there's a large trend recently of people reading the DMG while they're self isolating. Am I correct? Yeah, Chris Perkins started and I started seeing a bunch of other content creators just reading sections of the DMG. So I think it's appropriate to plug our very first episode of this podcast, where we also read the DMG. Please go check that out on our sadder page or any podcasting platform, because really I think we could rerelease in time and catch this trend, but I think it's time. Yeah, that's where we started. Now we're abridging it. Brain definitely trend setters. With our ten misers. That's what yeah, exactly. Listen, we could have rode the wave friends and Chris Perkins. So last time we left off we discussed magic in our world, and but that looks like in high magic versus low magic versus average magic settings, and then a couple specific scenarios. But today we move on to creating a campaign, something that I think at least the three of us are familiar with and something that I know a lot of our listeners are familiar with as well. So the first thing that it tells you to do when creating your first campaign is to start small, and in that it gives you three very specific steps to kind of follow into grow your campaign...

...out from this central idea into something larger. Create a home base, create a local region and create a starting adventure. Now, I don't know about you guys, but I definitely, without knowing it, I guess, have followed those exact three steps when creating my first campaign. I first started out with here's my small little city that they're going to start in, and I flesh that out. Then it was like, what is the region around that look like? I flesh that out and I was like, well, how do they how do I hook them in with the start. Was the first adventure going to look like, and then I finished that out. Yeah, I think sometimes people might switch the second and third one, but either way you get you get around to doing that kind of thing. But like all of those steps, for sure. Carlos, does your experience with creating your homebrew look similar? I pretty much created like a chapter. It was a story arc from start to finish, about a couple mpcs, and then I pretty much just introduced the players at the very beginning of the story. So the world itself was a lot of just randomized creation, with a story that the players could sort of kind of like a want, like a really long one shot right like, which was really easy to sort of plan out because there was a couple of key things and think the small island that they were playing and that kind of affected other things depending on when they arrived. But that was pretty much. It was pretty just generic, because I condom just wanted to let the story flow but have some cool moments and cool interactions that are guaranteed in almost any decision that players made. I actually I really enjoy the way that you did your homebrew setting when we were running that, because I feel like you streamlined it just enough so that we were on the path that you wanted us to be on, but not so much that it felt like you were just railroading us onto a random story. Because, especially like we started off like stepping off the boat, having been hired by this by this family, correct ran really immersing ourselves in this new setting that we were in, getting to know why we had all been hired. Going back to when I first started mine, I kind of dropped everybody in the middle of the town and said, okay, do what you will and encounters will happen from there, and I feel like that was maybe a little too much freedom. Like I feel like maybe it could use a bit more streamlining than that. Yeah, there's a there's always that like mix. You have to find some sort of a balance between railroading and allowing players to just kind of do whatever they want. It also depends, I think, on the experience of the players. Like veterans might be more comfortable in a more open world where they can go and do whatever they want and they'll find different plot boaks along the way and they'll be more open to just having random conversations with NPC's and not worried about the story coming up, but when you have new players, generally speaking, they're expecting the DM to give them some sort of like here's what you're supposed to do, you know, like Oh, like they just, you know, they don't know what they're there for yet, so you kind of have to like give them a little nudge. Yeah, I think. I think that's pretty much why, like, I think the biggest design inspiration that I took with regards to just the world itself was actually kingdom hearts. Like you know how you can just choose which new planet to go to. You don't really know what they hold, right, but each one has like a story in it, right, hmm. So I kind of wanted to be that way and that way in the world itself. I had areas like the docks and like all that inner stuff and the city and the villa of the forests, some of the more interesting timey areas, and all built...

...around this tiny island, right. So each little step kind of led you to an outcome, you know, like just something. I was also sort of trying to design around how comfortable I was also dming, so that made it easier to control encounters or what creatures or this, like the specifics of the location. So maybe that's where I'd say I'm a little bit more railroad is that. Usually I'll put like some sort of limiter somewhere if I know I'm not too comfortable with just like free room and do whatever you want just yet, you know, right, the DM needs time to get that kind of experience to you, right, because otherwise if you are like, if you don't feel comfortable with it, then the players will feel it too right and then the DM's going to be like, Oh, what am I doing here? I don't know, I'm you know, it just it doesn't flow as well. So having if, if you need to railroad like a little bit, then I think that's okay, like that's not a bad thing. I'm always kind of walking that time, because there's a lot of areas that I want to kind of introduce to my players, like I want to introduce them to a really, if this were, if we're talking RPG terms, like a like an endgame style boss earlier rock, so that they can see what they're eventually going to be up against. But I all so I'm not confident that my players aren't just going to try and rush down this endgame content at level three. A little bit of that back and forth between like I don't want to set limits, but like maybe I should set limits. But are they smart enough to know that there are limits? With an imposing limits? Or I guess not smart enough, more just a tune to the game enough, well seasoned? Yeah, yes, exactly. And you know what another thing, with the stories themselves is like in a specifically homebrew world, like I felt like I got really carried away as well, because there's certain story elements that I thought would be really cool to introduce but weren't necessarily level appropriate, and that's something that I've learned to work on now that I'm like, now that I've actually been playing through like to venihlation and just like reading how structured they are. In a way it's been helping a lot with like the the balancing aspect of it. But yeah, definitely starting small. Going back to the topic, I had like five locations planned at a time, right, and that's pretty much how I built the story. I don't know break that similar to you or I went before we started on my specific homebrew campaign. I had had way too much free talent on my hands for I mean, and I started crafting this world. You know what? How about? Can you explain your homeber campaign, because we know what it is. But Yeah, sorry, my homebrew campaign, for everybody that's familiar, or not familiar rather, is set in a world of my own design called Calix. It's essentially an island continant that is currently being torn asunder by war and essentially there's a small faction that's completely taken over an annext to whole province and it's between them and the main government. But that's all playing backdrop at this point to what the characters are experienced, which is essentially small towns full of rife corruption that they're trying to ideally trying to root out but in reality just becoming part of at this point. But this, this small area where we've spent almost thirty sessions now, is one province of this entire map and in...

...the year before we started this campaign I fleshed out every single province and the major cities within and major encounters that could happen within each of these cities and different things that they could touch on but probably won't touch on, but it's possible for them to touch on. So I feel like I'm overprepared. But it's also nice when they do something like they did a couple sessions ago, where they just out of nowhere, go, okay, I'm bored in this town, let's go somewhere completely new that we've never just guessed before and just pointed a map and go let's go there, like okay, let's let's go there. I've actually got a good idea of what's there, so let's do it right. And sometimes the longer that the players spend in one area right, the easier just to like prepare everything else around it. For sure, Jard and what about you? I've created a few worlds before. Most of it I would start with like one like major city, and then I would build almost it would become like a home base essentially, where that home base they would just keep coming back to and then people could spread out and do different quest but they would all mostly start from that area. So the outside area wasn't as important as as that home base. So I've worked a lot on building that. I've also helped my brother like create worlds and stuff like that before, and that was a little bit more like here's this big area and this is what's kind of going on and that kind of thing. So so the region became more important because in the players could move around it. It's interesting. There two very different kind of play styles, but I wouldn't necessarily say one is better than the other, because one when the players can go back to that home base, they feel attached to it. And so if you were to throw in something like, you know, a giant meteor comes down and smashes up a giant portion of the city, you know, and some mage did this, suddenly the players are like hey, like, we own this place or, you know, we live here. Don't go around blowing up our shit. We're going to go and take you down now, you know. So you can kind of like attach them to one specific place and that makes them more engaged that way. So there's just different aspects that you can get doing those kind of things. You know, that's actually something that I've ever thought about doing. It's just like giving the players something that they own right away, right, and have them like initially have something valuable that they're the part of right together. Yeah, most adventures like they own like nothing, like they're just like random people who are essentially traveling hobos and happen to have power. But if you were to think about it, a lot of the players would have some sort of a home, maybe a family, you know, like they would have friends in the area. Probably all grew up in that same area and could do all of their adventuring from one home base and just keep coming back to that place. Or what does the book have to say? Look, getting back to the book, we have a a category called set the stage, which is an essence similar to what a lot of us do for session zero. It's suggests filling the players in on the in for like the basics of what they really need to know about starting in your campaign. It recommends printing off a campaign hand out that has all the information. I've never done that before. I've just done it orally with the players and hope that they either remember or have the for said, to take notes. But I'm starting to think that I might be the way to go. What about you it? I have that forever on our...

...hand or mean yeah, our DM handed us out like a portion of the ever on book and kind of put it into a digital form where we could all access it, and that way we could number one, when we were creating our characters, we had an idea of what's going on in the world and so we can connect it to certain aspects. So I think one of the big things in ever on is that there's a mist so one of our characters had this like desire to get into the missed for a particular reason, and so they had this kind of long term goal in mind already from the beginning, just based on the world that was out there. Okay, Carlos, have you had any experience with this or mostly just oral session zero's? MMM, now, actually, that's a A. I think is a great idea actually thinking about it, just especially with the grots of character creation and initially getting people engaged, right, because in the session zero that we had or in the first session when we were in water dey, but kind of just plopped you guys in there without much context other than you're coming in, you're handing in an adventure. You are are actually, I guess, the prefaces. We ran you guys through death house first, right, or most of the group was ran through death house. Yeah, so there's already some sort of established push and then I kind of just plopped you guys in the city, but I didn't really describe much, right you've ended up. You ended up picking to Moentilation as a story that we were going to be running and then I kind of just started introducing chilt. It works out in this campaign, particularly because you guys aren't like people that live in chilt already, so there is no context for you guys to know anything, so it makes sense not to describe it. But I think going further into the campaign, once I want to start more exploring more personal goals for these characters, I will definitely be using this a little bit more seriously or like printing something out about the return, if they do returned, to who to water? Well, I'm excited for that. You know, you guys are getting into the meat of it now. So, yeah, we'll see where we end up. A session was a little bit sketch. We wait. Yea, but that is a great segue into the next topic here, which is involving the characters, which basically states that your character should be in some way attached to the story, or not the story rather, but the setting, either as a resident or as a visitor. And if their visitor, why are they a visitor and where did they come from and what do they expect to find here? Are they part of or aware of the organizations in the area? Do they need to? Should they be? I suppose we and are going back to the team of a nihilation campaign. We're kind of working for an organization. I think some people might be possibly. Yeah, you and I not much. Party members are. Well, overall, you guys are definitely working for an organization, except maybe newt, because all of you are technically part of the adventure. Is Guilt Right, and for your subcontracted per se to go fix these issues. So yes, you're definitely a working for somebody. New was we had a casualty. New It was is a new came in later on in the adventure, but also not part of the region.

But yeah, yeah, you guys are definitely working for somebody. I did try to introduce and give you guys a little bit of like character engagement through things like criminal contact and Tiri right, like have people traveled in children whispers, whispers from you know, parts of your characters at like stories, but not so much other than that, I don't think Jordan. Yeah, character involvement is extremely important. Obviously, a lot of my experience with that, because it's all been one shots. I've recently been doing the thing where I try to get characters, I like players together, to meet up beforehand and make a story together where they are somehow attached to each other, because it gives them that extra like feeling, I guess, of owning a port, a part of that world, right, and when they do that, then they can get into the role play a lot easier and it doesn't feel as like Dungeon Crawley, which maybe some people like, but the role play has always been, I think, the most interesting part to me. I'm with you there. But are your players mostly just playing GTA? Yeah, when actually, when you're doing a one shot, a lot of people understand that they are playing a one shot and so they expect that they are going to be railroaded a little bit more and that the story is going to progress in a way that the the DM has prepared for. So, whereas if you're playing in a full campaign, which I'm going to be starting up soon, then you end up with people who are going to just kind of go wherever they want to and then that's when the GCA, you know, kind of get some it starts to show up a lot right that. In that case I think I will definitely be explaining a bit of the history of the world and I will be working with the players ahead of time to be able to connect them to the world and also try and connect some of the players together as well so that they aren't this mishmash of of random people, which can sometimes work, but other times it can feel really forced. So I'm going to try and make sure that everyone's kind of on the same page and then you can kind of move forward from from there at least a like, at least to a certain extent. So the last section that we got here is creating a background, and that focuses on exactly that, a background in the mechanic sense, so like an acolyte or a criminal or stage, etc. Etc. So is suggests that if you have a very specific organization or background or really something that differs significantly from what you would be more accustomed to in a prerun game or a premade game, that you flesh that out into a full background option, either by adapting it from other pre existing backgrounds or by creating a new one. Now, I've never done this personally. I've seen it every I feel like every new campaign guide and setting guide comes with a new set of backgrounds that you can use, but I've never personally made one. Do either of you have experience with that? I mean, I've tried running like Alkali characters. I've tried incorporating a little bit of the background into a story. It's about it. I can't see that I've created any. I would think it would be cool to have those different kind of backgrounds.

Usually when I'm when I do backgrounds, I actually talk to them beforehand and I say, what do you imagine your character to be like? Is there you know, what kind of story are you hoping to create here? And from that story you can usually find a mechanical background that fits that narrative, because there are quite a few out there, and if there isn't, then then you could always like, think about making another one. I have recently thought like, you know, what if they were just like a farmer or something like that, you know, like which isn't like an Urchin or, you know, a sailor or anything like that. It's just kind of normal commoner and that that's their background? What? What? There isn't one of those in the player's hand book, I guess. So, like I'm will faim normal common our family gets killed. Yeah, how did you hear? You suggest a tragedy free background, you mom. That's when Papa Joe stood up. That's IT, kid, I'm an adventure now and stepped off the farm. Well, that pretty much does it for this section of the DMG. So I think we'll leave it there for today. If you have any thoughts about anything that we've said today, or if you have any opinions to weigh at on about this section of the DMG, hit us up on Instagram at real city society and Jordan. I believe that it is time for some critical thoughts. All Right, I think for today. Last week I thought of one and I really want to go over this. So the big question for the for the day is what is an insight check? A lie detector? Clean? I think an insight check is a reading of the situation. I I'll treat it more of a you know, you're aware of maybe events that led you to this moment, certain character traits somebody. Maybe an insight check might become easier over time the more you spend time with a character. Those kinds of things, like mannerisms and motives that you might pick up that are not necessarily like you see a glint of a knife action. Cool, Braden. Any thoughts? I see insight as kind of how well you can read a person. So how well everybody talks about how you have that gut instinct when something's wrong. Yeah, and I don't think it's necessarily that. It's not just this raw feeling that you get, but it's more of an educated version of that, in my opinions. So you're looking at somebody, it's like, Oh, I'm not sure what to think of this guy. I'm going to try and read them a bit, and then you're getting the vibe that you know there's something there's something not right about this guy. There's he's a little shifty, or you know, he's he's doing this weird thing with his eye. The more I look at him and it makes me think that maybe it's a towel like. It's about. It's about really trying to suss out how much you can tell about somebody's character. And Actually, I'm glad Carlos said a lot of detective thing first, because that's something I feel like that's what players think it is. Come in and they're like, Oh, yeah, I'm Gett insight check that and I've had the characters that I've run that are from premade modules that pretty much say there's nothing that you can really glean from this character. They've devoted their life to secrecy, into the arts and secrets, like they will not have a tell, like, no matter how hard your players check, they will not be able to tell. That their line right, and I've had players that, like you could think,...

...lean though, then, that they're incredibly good at hiding secrets. Okay, basically, that they're. I've been I've had players role a natural twenty like, you know that they're an incredibly hard person to read and you can't really pick up on that, like, but I ruled natural twenty, but it doesn't give me us. Yeah, that's that's lovely for you, but that's it's not an instant when necessarily it's. Well, well, the thing is it's an insight check, right. It's not a read your mind check, right, because a player, if an if a bad guy, hasn't given any motives, right, and you roll extremely high on an insight check. Right. Yeah, that makes perfect sense to me. Britain, it's like you can't you can't read this person. You know that much, but it doesn't mean you know what they're up to. Yeah, exactly. You're not going to be able to read their thoughts just because you've right, looked at them a little more closely than the guy next to you. Now, I guess, just to expand on the inside check here, do you guys think insight checks are only used with other characters around or other NPC's or other people to read? Have you ever done an inside check we not got feeling like, Oh, yeah, I think bad is about to happen, kind of yeah, yeah, it's interesting, right, because that's also I think that's also part of it, right. Yeah, like it. Maybe if you walk into a room and you have an awful feeling walking into a room, you kind of see, you know, it's so much like I think the biggest differentiation I'd have to make here is between like that insight check walking into a location versus an investigation check, right, because an investigation check you're looking for information, right, and you're trying to retrieve information from that room, or as an insight check, you're just getting a feeling or getting, you know, your vibe, checking your vibe, checking. I wouldn't yeah, maybe, yeah, I would almost run that under passive insight. So if you're if you're walking into a room, let and let's say there's an invisible enemy in the room who is like, you know, ready to pounce on you, if your passive insight is higher than what they rolled for their stealth or maybe their deception or whatever it is that they're ruling, then I would say maybe they have like a feeling that something is wrong or something bad is about to happen or something along those lines. So I would almost say like that's a that's like a passive thing, because if you are to get the players to like, every time they walk into a room, insight check, you know, like that's that's what's going to happen. So I think passive, passive insight and passive perception and that kind of thing can really play into where locations are involved or invisible creatures or, you know, things that they aren't expecting necessarily but they might like instinctively pick up on. HMM, yeah, I guess I don't know if I don't know how I news that with creatures. That's really interesting because I don't know, I don't know if I'd want to use insight in that manner of like a like a ping or like ankelocation kind of thing. I don't know, that seems weird to it doesn't, dect. I get what you're saying, like you're saying with a PA like using the passive stat rat, like you're not always pursue, like perceiving everything. I like it's like maybe there's just invisible ghosts that are haunting the area that aren't going to do the players any home they could still get that same kind of like Oh there's something wrong in this building kind of field right, right, and that's like a it's a passive thing that's kind of, I don't know, given to them almost and I've always kind of seen wisdom and inside is under the wisdom checks. I've always kind of seen wisdom as something that is actually gleaned from outside of yourself. So most of most...

...of the time anyway, especially for spellcasters, wisdom is something that you can get from an outside source, such as a god or deity or a some sort of powerful being, or just the universe itself kind of telling you, Hey, there's, you know, something going on here, or pay attention to this. So what kind of information do you generate with an in and with an inside check? Then right, yeah, because you got to give her, you got to reward the players. Right, exactly, like stepping away from just like Oh, this person is lying. Right, stepping away from that kind of check. How do you deliver that conversationally? Get feelings right, like gut feelings of like Oh, something's wrong here, or you know what, I don't really feel anything, you know, I maybe I trust this person or that, that kind of thing. I would say it wouldn't come down to you know, Oh, you can obviously tell that they're lying, but for and a straight inside check, if they're like, if they think that the person is lying, then maybe you use insight to kind of like watch them closely for any kind of ticks or tells. And that would take time then. Right. And I was just looking in just straight up at the wikipedia entry on insight just to gain a little bit of perspective on how to maybe introduce it in a game, and one of the things that's like that sticks out to me is the actor result of understanding the internature of things or seeing something intuitively. M Right. Yeah, that's I think that's maybe where I was going with a like when you walk into a room or PC's that kind of that you gain more information of them over time, right. But that's why I think the way that I've done that is the more that somebody is with someone, that ease your insight checks become or just in general, the more you get to know somebody. But intuition is interesting in this because it could just be, oh, you know where the you you know where the hidden lever for a room is because you watch that the wizard has like an injured right hand or he favors is left right or some shit like that. Right, like an observer him, a sherlock kind of like yeah, yeah, exactly, you know, scuffing on his right hand or whatever, I can in infer that he is some sort of a minor and, you know, does this for a living and that means that he might go and do this. Yeah, have you ever, guys, having done any inti checks like that or anything like that in games? I'm going. I gotta want to. I think I'm don't want to do that now. Yeah, it's really cool. Yes, yeah, that's a neat idea. Yeah, it I think it'll be super cool. Just it just I think, like insight has been kind of abused in the past as just just the light detector, but there's so much more that you can kind of, you know, put into it that can tell you really interesting and tid bits right, and it makes it I think. I think that for the DM It's difficult to be able to figure out, you know, what does this person see for, you know, intuition, because we aren't actually sherlocks, right, most of us? Yeah, although interesting idea for a Sherlock Holmes style of character. You know. Yeah, yeah, absolutely, I'm actually running one right now. Oh, yeah, it's been a lot of fun because it is it. Are you using high insight checks for like, are you relying on your insight? Oh, yeah, well, trying to. Okay, so far it hasn't come up too much, but I I'm also I took the observant feat, so I'm I've got like a very high perception and a very high I I'm also an expert in I took the Bar,...

...so I've got lots of skills and high wisdom everything. So I'm hoping it'll come into play a little bit more. I'm kind of going off of more of a mentalist vibe than I am a Sherlock Holmes vibe. So okay, yeah, that's what if you could do some sort of like a magical creature vibe, like a lepri con or something. Don't look like some medical people. I can just read people musing detect thoughts. It's great. Yeah, power, right stuff. Yeah, so I think that's all I have for for tonight. Thanks for listening. Everyone. Follow us at Royal City Society on Instagram, where you can find all of our posts about the different things that we put out there, like our madam ensel's roguish accessories or the way of the gravitational force, and now also including our music. Yeah, also, yeah, lots lots of stuff to check out. Give us a send us a DM if you have any questions or if you just want something to be talked about on the PODCAST, like we're open to all that kind of things. And, yeah, we'll see y'all next week.

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