Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 2, Episode 2 · 2 years ago

Ep. 14 - Character Creation

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we dive into how we handle character creation in our campaigns, continue our path into the dungeon masters guide and finish off with yet another Critical Thought.

Hello, welcome everybody back to yet another episode of this Fancy Little Podcast we've got going on here. Triple advantage. We're an episode two now of our second season, and today we're joined by Braden and Jordan and myself, Carlos. Why did I say weird joined? That's a weird perspective to use, Carlos are hill. We go to your head a little bit. Just a podcast man. All right. Well, Braden, you're going to be taking us through and doing some divining of the DMG, as we'd like to call it in super nerdly speak. If otherwise, we're just taking guys through the Dungeon Masters Guide, if you're just a regular human being. And Jordan, you will be concluding our podcast again today with another one of your critical thoughts. Keep coming up with all these questions and the you know, it's great source of content. Really gotta love it. But before we get into any of that, I want to talk to you guys about our characters, because just on Friday I had to start considering whether I might have to reroll again. I was playing in Braden's horde of the Dragon Queen Campaign, and let me tell you this encounter. I guess a troll that we found was not going great. There's some drake's involved, kind of downing as it looked like it was going south. So I'm glad that we laid down our weapons. But yeah, you know those moments when you have to reconsider what kind of character you're going to be playing. I had that and I kind of wanted to talk to you guys about this because with Thorn, the character that I've been playing, I've sort of been it didn't really have a back story. So it's just sort of been discovering what I want to add to this character as the sessions progress and each time we level up, I'm sort of flavoring him. Sounds Weird, I'm sort of adding more mines do later it's coming more cases. I've I've predominantly been eating in this campaign. So No, but I've been adding a little bit more more flavor in the terms of story to this character as we go on and what kind of the how I want to visualize abilities and so forth. So I was going to ask you guys, what are some characters that you guys have had in mind or recently something that you might want to discover as an NPC or maybe as a like a PC in a regular campaign. I was introduced relatively recently. Actually, I guess it's quarantine times. Makes no sense. It's been a while, but somebody introduced me to what's called Aurora builder, which is an online tool that you can use to instantly, not instantly, but very, very easily create a character and a character sheet. Like, if you're new to creating a character sheet, you can be a little bit daunting to figure out what you're filling out and everything, but this it's just kind of even easier than dd beyond you just take the boxes instantly generated, and that kind of let me. It also has this whole section for like what's your character background, and like a whole biosection, and it kind of UN walked up. Always got all these ideas going around in my head and now it gave me this outlet to just I don't have to keep them in my head anymore. I can just get them out there. So I've got I'm sitting on this library of like twenty characters that I'd like to play now, which I thought was a lot until I was talking to the guy, our friend Matt, who showed me a r a builder, who said he has upwards of a hundred save to hear, so I guess I'm on the low end, but I was always I've had a character concept that I've been playing around with for a long time. One of my first character concepts was in Fadin, who am playing in Carlos has campaign with. Without getting into too much detail, he's kind of the DD fantasy version of the punisher, but kind of right alongside him, I had a concept for a kind of the opposite. He's the he's kind of a guy that got involved with the wrong stuff for the wrong reasons, like he's very vengeance seeking. So we turned to a to a warlock patron. This other character I had was kind of a more precocious character who turned to the wrong stuff for the right reasons, like she grew up very sheltered in a kind of an upperclass library and family. So she surrounded by books and she was groomed to be kind of a magician for her for as a wizard for her entire life. But she like she's very closely monitored. She's her parents are crazy protective and she hates that. She wants to rebel...

...from that, but she surrounded by all this these books and at one point she gets her hands on some forbidden books regarding subjects like necromancy and some darker areas of magic and starts to really delve into that. And so in secret kind of she presents herself as like this law abiding wizard and training, but in secret she's kind of this expert of the the darker arts of magic and I would I'd like to play a character like that where it's kind of it's more nuance to trying to present to something while you're actually something else. Like how do you hit that balance of life? I am this, but I can't show you that on this but like it's going to come out at some point. So how do I start like slowly seeping those elements into the character? Cool? Are you doing? Well, I am currently looking at my list of character your ideas. I started out, I guess, more of a Min Maxi kind of guy. So I so my first few characters I created I was like Oh, this would be it's a cool idea and it kind of fits a character that I would pull from either a book or a movie or TV show or whatever, and I would say, okay, how can I now maximize this character? So he's most like this person but also really powerful. So I was more of a Min Maxi kind of guy up until recently, where I've kind of just been like, okay, now I just want to play into different quirks about the person and actually kind of get more into that role playing side, because I find it it's a lot more fun. So I'm with with that. I started first with creating elaborate backstories on people and why they act the way they act and stuff like that, but I found that is actually pretty easy to just make a character that can be fun without having to get two in depth into back stories. So I I I looked up like a bunch of like quirks that you can give people. So just different, different things that that this that this character is. You know, they're like normal for the most part, but they've got this one thing that's really weird. So like maybe they're afraid of blood, which is kind of hard for an advent sure to go through a campaign, you know, that involves most likely a lot of killing. With a fear of blood, maybe they just have this random thing that happens where they get nosebleeds a lot, or maybe they are I don't know. They fall asleep at random times, right like the freet what it's called arcolept yeah, that one. You know, maybe they have all these kind of like quirks, and so then you you can kind of play into the quirk instead of into the backstory. And there will be a back story, but you don't have to have this, you know, really like elaborate like this is the hero of the story kind of story. You can actually just have like, oh, this is just a person and he wants to be an adventurer and he happens to have this condition or he, you know, is just this kind of a guy. You know, whatever, whatever you're working with, you can kind of just come up with random, fun ways of getting it to work. So I've got like a list of like I'm looking at like forty different names here, and they all have like one little quirk or whatever attached with it. Most of them came from like medical conditions that were odd or different or whatever, and others of them had to do with what their name means in different languages and stuff like that. So it's it's interesting the kind of things that you can come up with when you just kind of throw out ideas. But I find that keeping like that list is super useful. Otherwise I will forget about it. You guys have pretty big list of characters. Do use these as NPC's in your stories at times, or do you leave them predominantly as characters that you want to explore in a more story fashion? Generally I would prefer to play them as a as a player and not as a DM, but not always possible. One thing that I've started doing is if I have a character that exists, I don't think that's realizable. Man, if I have a character that I'm playing in a campaign and either that campaign gets dropped into oblivion and we never pick it up again, or if that character dies within the campaign, I've been known to kind of bring them back in minor formats as NPCs throughout my homebrew campaigns, not as like not as...

...like huge central NPC's, but kind of as like side characters. More is more as kind of a nod to people that are playing across both across both sections, and to get a chance to play them a little bit again. It's nice to slip back into a character you haven't played for a while. It also gives you a nice little backdrop to dnd homebrew, as it's now considered a somewhat purgatory of fallen PCs. GRATS, you're all dead. Nice. What a twist at the end of the tail, ruined by setting. Oh Yeah, what's that? What do you think about this? Oh Yeah, so for me, with the longer back stories that I have written out for some of the characters, I like to use those ones as my adventures because they're the ones that I can roll play the most in any given kind of scenario. With the ones that are just just have like a quirk or whatever, it's really easy to slip those into NPC's that you make. So like you meet a you meet a peddler on the road and they just have, you know, really dry skin. As you as they shake your hand, you know you feel this like Oh, this is like really weird. You can kind of just slip those kind of things into a conversation or whatever without it having to be this like big overpowering like arc if that makes sense. So I can use I like using those as as kind of the MPC's that I can bring into the world and it kind of gives me like a little bit of a sense of like Oh yeah, I have I can get through some of these names without, you know, having to create fifty different characters and play in different, fifty different campaigns, or kill myself off a bunch, you know. Sorry. So how do you think you balance that interaction than between the back story that you've felt for the character and maybe how you interact or how you try to play the campaign that you're currently in? Because, objectively speaking, and too of annihilation, none of your backgrounds really matter that much and I think the campaign has that as one of its inherent disc connections. Maybe with players actually, I don't know. Maybe, but just think about it a little bit, like newer players won't really care older players. If you're more experienced, I guess you could incorporate it in some way, but just in general, given that we had a player death, for example, in the campaign as well. It's not a player death, character player character death. Yeah, I died scandy. Now, yeah, given that one of the characters actually died, we had to introduce somebody so that person could continue playing. Right, Britain like it's been like okay, by your out of this campaign to later. So right, so that character kind of was just dropped in there. Yeah, so is mine actually it was just kind of dropped into it, you know what I mean. So, as designers of these characters and as people who are invested in playing them, you know, and another campaigns in general, right. I like, how do you guys handle being able to play that back so or that you have in one way or another and somebody else's campaign? So for me, I I really enjoy quirks. So often times my backstory will include something that this character does specifically because of something that happened in their past. It doesn't always have to be that way, which is so to nihilation would be an excellent one for people to just try out different quirks that they can have if they want to have a stutter, if they want to have, you know, something that like isn't going to affect the game too much in terms of like like backstory wise, but you can just kind of like try out these different cool things. For the campaign that I'm putting together, it's very heavily backstory based and I'm a little bit worried because if if a player or a character player dies, then all that work that went into the backstory and stuff like that kind of goes out the window. Unless I can find a way to to kind of bring them back. So backstory like gets the players invested,...

...but at the same time, when it doesn't pan out or if something goes wrong and and it kind of just ruins the whole like idea that they originally had, then it kind of feels like almost like a waste. Like I had a character that was kind of meant to was meant to follow around another one of the player characters and listen to everything that they did and was kind of like they're there, their squire person like kind of like just totally loyal to this person. This person ends up dying. It happened in the campaign. What does my character do? I kind of had an idea of what I wanted to do with it, but that wasn't supposed to happen until much later and it was like one of the you know, first couple of sessions that it happened and I was like Oh boy, okay, where do I go from here? This wasn't supposed to happen yet. How do I, you know, make this characters backstory now means something, since the main part of his back story has now just been killed off, you know, so backstory has you know that that investment and it could have been really cool if it works out, but there are always like random things that you can't account for and it ends up kind of can spin out of control. I worked it a little bit, but it's not the same and I kind of wish it had worked out better, but we'll see. What's difficult write. It's like, especially like as a DM. Sometimes I prefer running these characters as NPC's because I have that control in the store, because I have that choice of being able to introduce them at any point in time of this hypothetical like past experience that they might have had. HMM. So that way I can explore different new I like exploring different nuances of characters and I haven't gotten to do that in a little bit, mostly because, like, I've been running the premade characters of tomb most recently, but that's kind of like the like. I don't know. You guys both said You'd like to play your characters. I think I like to sit more on the I like to use my characters in in that DM fashion and like as NPC's within a game, because I like seeing how this idea that I might have plays with other people, because I know how I'm going to play this right, like I know. I like for me, I feel like I know how I'm going to approach character progression. Right, HMM. But I find it really fun when it I throw that character progression at somebody and see, all right, what are you gonna do with it? Like Oh, this is a villain that's been plotting, oh, that's been watching you, you know, for whatever reason, for your entire campaign. This is how they're going to play an encounter. Now, how are you going to deal with that? Right, HMM. But I definitely don't have a giant set of premade characters like you has do either, though it's not for everybody. I don't know all the stats listed out for it, all of them. So I have to like once I've decided, like once I've decided on a campaign, I still have to go and like actually make the physical being of them. It's just kind of like this idea that I throw out there and I'm like, don't forget about this, this could be useful at some point in time. That's the Nice thing about a Roora builder, because that's what I used to do. I had a literal like scrap of paper that had all these random jot note ideas for characters on it and now I've just like it's all written out, it's all fully done. It took me like maybe five to ten minutes of character HMM, versus however long it would take on average if you were doing it old school, right. And now like somebody goes, Hey, you want to join a campaign, drop in, done, here's my sheet on the spot, I'm ready to go. That is kind of Nice. I will say. Yeah, well, and especially if your characters, if you're using just the names or whatever, I like at least that you have a resource of names that you can pull from. That's true, but I'd love to hear thoughts more on this as I continue to develop thorn. Just let you know, Jordan, actually thorn as a character that I sort of quickly made for this campaign, doesn't really have a backster and I said, I don't think it really matters too much faith on how I want to explore this monk that I've made way of the shadow and we just leveled up to six. So you have the cool abilities now. I got real cool abilities in brains campaign. He actually introduced Mada mental's roguish accessories and available DM s good. Exactly too. Look at him go, and I bought smoke bombs off of NCIL notice. So you can just create your own darknesses to jump into...

...and out of. I'm thinking some minatoe flavoring on this one, but yeah, let's see where I go with it. But I is that's a I think that's enough time for this discussion that we've had. We need to move on. We're on a schedule here, guys. This is official Royal City Society Business and, as I say that, Britain, you know what time it is. I believe it is that time. Let's take a look at the DMG and attempt to divine it in our segment, divining the DMG, which is why it is called that, so tied up in a nice parcel. Let's start. Last week we finished off looking at major campaign events, going through events such as extinction of resources, the introduction of new organizations or new inventions, prediction and prophecy, and how to kick those up to a ten, introducing them on world shaking levels, such as the death of a god or the destruction of an entire plane, for example. This week it looks like we're going to have a bit of a shorter section, but that's okay because we went pretty long last week. So let's start with something I think Carlos is going to be super excited before, and something that we talked about in the past, tracking time. How we figure out how to record time and deal with the passage of time in our campaigns? It's suggests in the book planning ahead for this kind of stuff, picking a date, a literal date, for the start of your campaign, making a note, making a calendar saying x is going to happen on this day, why is going to happen on that day, and then letting it to progress as such. It does say that your fantasy world's calendar doesn't have to mirror the modern one. Mine does, like I didn't even bother to give it fancy names or anything. I don't know about you guys, I didn't. When I went through to create my calendar, I wasn't like, Oh, I'm going to create fantasy see calendar within the world. I was like no, this is a tool that I'm using to track just so I can give people more hard and fast deadlines and stuff. So I'm just using a standard calendar Full Sen how do you guys construct those how you guys construct your in universe timelines? Yeah, so I I am. I'm kind of debating this right now actually, as I'm creating my campaign. Wild Mount comes from Exandrea, which is met Mercer's created world, and it has its own like calendar that comes with it and its own holidays and everything like that. But the thing is is that, though it's there in the book, it doesn't it doesn't offer like a way that's really easy for me to find a program that is like, Oh, yeah, here's your calendar. Is a really easy way to write notes down on it and like no easy calendar, look at this thing. So I've been looking into different programs that can do that, because it does have all the months written out and the days and number of days and everything, and I think that's really cool. But in the end it comes down to the fact that I'm literally trying to just use this as a tool to track where people are and what they're doing and potentially different times of the years and different festivals in that kind of thing. So, for if I wanted to make it easy, like I think I should just kind of go with the normal count like just use a normal calendar and throw in the holidays that are listed there on the calendar, because I feel like that would just make more sense for the players as well, because now they have to learn this whole new calendar system as well. They don't have to have to, but like it. It would make it easier on them if they understood what was going on and it just I don't know, I'm not sure how I feel about it just yet. I'm kind of trying to weigh my options here and flip back. I keep flipping back and forth as to which one makes the most sense. Carlos, what do you think about that? I agree with not having to burden anybody with another calendar system, especially if you're I mean, it depends on your players. This is so subjective, just given the game itself, but I feel that if I am joining a game where it's more of like a dungeon crawler, do dates on a calendar really mean much to me? So, therefore, is it really it's it actually goes back into one of those types of mechanics for maybe if the player doesn't see it, it doesn't exist. Right. So if I'm just dungeon delving, why...

...do I care that it's October or whatever month? You're trying to tell me that it is right. So unless the story itself has some sort of ties in with the calendar, I don't even think that that's something that I would expose to the players. Now, on a very rudimentary system, I keep track of days past and I use that as a gage of what changes might have occurred to a location. But again I'll use kind of like a the game, like the game renders only where the players exist in it, right. So the story itself is around my player characters not necessarily keeping everything else alive and moving. As you know, they're doing something in chalt right, because otherwise I'd be conducting an orchestra of managing of like NPCs and cities. If your campaign was is detailed. But I use it more of a if you leave a settlement, for example, and go into the forest, will keep track of how many days you've been gone and that might affect whether you know, the settlement of fast moving merchants might be gone right if you're a turn or some people might go looking for you or whatever. But it's not necessarily something that the players need to manage themselves. Is just something that happens as they're moving from location to location, at least for now anyways. I know that in past episodes we've talked about having events within the world and I think one goal that I want to have with my timekeeping system is just to keep it very simple in that manner. I just tracked days. I think we're just breaking over the hundred day of adventuring in chilt and I really like the calendar systems from Games like harvest moon and star do valley, very simple sort of. Each month is thirty days and you can get these kinds of resources, like certain berries might only grow in the spring, for example, because that makes it easier to manage, and then a player doesn't necessarily need to remember new days, new names for days, new names for months. If you're if you're not using seconds and hours or whatever however type of DM you want to be like, that's a lot more stuff for our player needing to juggle. But I do hope that the calendar that I'm that I'll be using once you guys return, if you continue to play these characters, if you've managed to make it out of Chelt to start heading in more of a stard valley kind of maybe a hundred day per season. That way there's enough days to go adventuring and come back and still be able to experience some of the seasonal activities without having to like, Oh shit, we miss this event, I have to wait a year now, like what the fuck does that mean? Like I'll just take a long rest until it comes back right like. So just a little bit more open in that regard. At the same time, though, sorry to cut in there. So, for instance, there is a specific spell I'm thinking of. I believe it's the teleportation circle, where you can create a teleportation circle and teleport to any other teleportation circle. I think it's a fifth level spell, maybe six, but specifically in the rules it states that you can create a permanent teleportation circle after doing that spell in that same spot for one full year every day. So, like I've always wondered, like when would anyone actually ever pull this off, like, have you guys seen any any time that that someone actually did this in a campaign? Like that's not something normal that would normally happen, because everyone's always moving and trying to find a new quest or whatever, like unless you specifically stated, okay, guys, we're going to sit here and not do anything for a full year, except cast that spell right there, you know. Or if you had multiple wizards, maybe you could do like, okay, today, I will travel us out of here and we'll do something and make sure you hold onto that one fifth level spell that guests back here. Well, it doesn't state the the CASTER has to be the same one, right, that just is that. That's sir. So I'm just leaking pay someone. Well, no, I'm just thinking, like think about okay, as a player, I can see that being really difficult to implement, unless you're saying this is a higher level, you know, party and you're a...

...wizard. What have you been doing this entire time to the player and you know, sort of some work something out. If You'R DMOs that you have that ability, right, because, like, you're getting the character sheets beforehand. So if you're staying a High Level Party, the story that starts at high level. Yeah, like what your players already been able to cast this magic. You're not unaware of it up until you start. Right, it would make sense that could have them. But again, this involves, I think, more experienced players with more experienced M's. Just to get to that level of you know, yeah, I have these abilities and I would have been using these abilities not just necessarily what is my character? What is their profession? Who is your daddy and what does he do? Kind of thing. Yeah, yeah. On another note, though, I think that it's a great story tool for the DM because I key, I think of like the cobalt soul, for example. Those teleportation circles are definitely permanent, right M yeah, no, it's super interesting, but it's kind of weird to think about the time that would be spent, I guess, on that kind of thing. You know. Yeah, but if you have an entire like cohort of individuals continually traveling between cities using those same like you know, then the subway, it's a subway system. Yeah, example, right as is an established just underground teleportation. I'll touch you on two things quickly from that. First of all, after Carlos has previous datement, I now really want to do a setting where the actual calendars laid out like started valley or harvest moon first, literally like a four month year and every month is a different season. I think that would be awesome. I think it's just easier to keep track because I like there's not too many days and too many months. Otherwise I don't know. Yeah, it makes sense. But to quickly touch on that point about the teleportation circles, one thing that I think you could do, which I'd actually like to try at some point if the opportunity presents itself. In the first season of critical role, I think they took like a threeweek break or something, and it was just after defeating one of the it might have been the Chroma Conclave. It was one of the big bats. They had just defeated something significant, and Matt said to them, all right, when we come back for our next session, it will have been one year. One Year has passed in the game. Over the next two or three weeks, or however long it was, talk amongst each other, talk to me, figure out what your characters did together, separately, whatever, in that year and when we come back we'll do a quick rundown of what the last year has been like in the world and then we'll jump straight into it. That could be an opportunity to do something cool like that. Yeah, the DMG goes on to talk about things to include it when you're making a calendar which includes physical cycles, like seasons, like moon phases, etc. Religious observances, so things like our Christmas or Passover or Ramadan or similar civic observances. So something like I don't know, what do we have that similar to that? Canada Day, I guess. Yeah. And then the one that I really want to dive into is fantastic events. So things that you wouldn't really see in they wouldn't really be marked necessarily on a calendar and they wouldn't be something that you would see in our modern society. So the examples that it gives is like maybe local folklore knows that every every year on the winter equinox, and Ghost Lee castle appears on the hilltop overlooking the village. Or maybe the third moon of the third full moon of every cycle is a blood moon and we're wolves, another transformative species, yet extra heightened powers from that, the first thing that I think of. You guys haven't really encountered it, but there's a a little niche village kind of out in the middle of a out in the middle of one of my regions of my homebrew campaign that celebrates that. They live on the swamp plant and they celebrate the festival of the frogs every year, which is essentially when all the frogs from this swamp land to come and proke in unison on the banks of the swamp just out of this town. Have you guys ever done anything like that where it's it's not like something that would appear on a calendar necessarily, but it's kind of like this local festival or this local folklore knows that this event happens like clockwork every time. I haven't done it personally, but it's it's...

...definitely an interesting idea. I feel like it would almost be more of a like this is a remote village kind of feeling like as far as that kind of stuff goes, because it's almost a because it's not mainstream right. If it was like if it was like the capital city, you know, does this, but other cities don't, don't, it would be kind of weird almost. So would have to be almost like an outline region that does something along those lines, or just one that is in a very isolated part of yeah, the world itself. What about something like the the every third moon gives like special powers, where it's like it's not something that you would necessarily mark, but it's something that's everybody's kind of aware of. That is a pretty interesting like I hadn't actually thought about something like that. It's really interesting, though, to think that you might, that you could pull off something like that and it would be really interesting, like, I don't know, with with the players know beforehand to or would they just start to feel it more as you go through the game? I would almost want to play with that one and just see what happens. M and then again tees into the whole. If it's something that is persistent in your world and something that should be used, then I feel like you should introduce it to the players earlier on as an actual mechanic within your world, because otherwise it wouldn't make sense to me that these new adventures that have been also sharing the land with everybody here don't know about its powered, especially when I cut again, especially when it comes to like more intelligent cre Chus, creatures that can plan things, you know, to their advantage. So if it's a group of intelligent like in thropes that you know, get empowered one time during the month, that might be the day that they plan to attack a keep if it's something that's in their intentions or whatever, or maybe that hunters tend to avoid the land during these times so the players might know this or, you know, upon interaction, might discover this both the land. But, for example, I understand that. I can kind of understand the mechanic and it's something that I didn't I chose not to really incorporate to too much. But, for example, into Mo Annihilation it's supposed to rain a lot and that rain changes the difficulty of encounters based on the roll of a DF right. So every day you might be in a downpour or not, and that's something that I chose not to incorporate completely and just make it more of like a hot, humid jungle that you're sort of slogging through, because I didn't feel like, given the area of discovery and moving around, you know, if you're always making the roles at disadvantage, it's going to kind of suck. It might be good if you're like a more experienced player in you know, like or even if we might have worked around to what exactly is childer right, like some some some adventuring parties might have done a little bit of research or whatever, and maybe then I would have introduced it more. It's like, Hey, let's be getting into later in the campaign kind of thing. Yeah, like Hey, you're going to be getting into some pretty treacherous territory here. As Adventures, you know that this is going to be difficult, but as new players at the same time, because you know there's a fair share, or there was a fair share initially, and like it didn't seem fun to just be like, okay, now training all your attack reals are disadvantage fun with that. Yeah, it just seems like a lot of choice. I think it did happen once or twice. I did introduce it a couple of times. I'll likely bring it back, but it is supposed to be a bigger mechanic within chalt as well. Like I know that if I were to keep it to a tea, I should be rolling every day a D for determining whether or not it's going to be a down poor right. I just have chosen, just due to my own whatever Mut to have it as a core mechanic and, like I mentioned, as such, it's not something that I'm going to tell you guys as well, you know, because, like it does, it does affect how you approach and counters too. I like in the group, if you're saying, Oh, if we go into the forest, there might be a good chance of rain. You guys have never really thought of that. It's been more of like okay, which continue going forward and then so I would love to. If I run this again, I definitely would had that. But I feel like if I run it again,...

...the players and the people that we normally play with her a little bit more experience that as well. They could keep track of something like that a little bit better. So the last thing that I want to touch on for this week's dividing the DMG is ending a campaign, and what its specifically says is hitting level twenty does not necessitate that that's the end of your story, and vice versa. The end of your story doesn't necessitate hitting level twenty. It says to end your campaign when the story has naturally run its course, once you feel like you've gotten a beneficial exits from every single characters story. So once everybody satisfied, you're pretty good. which brings us to kind of a bit of a natural stopping point, because none of us have ever finished a campaign. Yeah, ever in true format, outside of the occasional one shot in even half of those don't get finished. So what you write a main like story like campaign for your for your world. Sorry, and I'm out of the book. Yeah, there is a there is a main underlying story. There's several, in fact, like it's right, my world is kind of a setting. So there's a ton of different crap that you could run up against, right, and any one of those could lead to something that could be considered a d game type contents that could probably be satisfying enough to just leave their full stop. But there is one that's will likely take forever for you guys actually discover that. I kind of had the idea of this is really like the biggest thing that you could possibly do and I can't really top it. Okay, have you guys like have you put any thought into where your stories are going to end at all? I think that for me, the main story as we are now, would end whenever you guys uncover all of the secrets of child. I have to be very careful here, but whenever you guys progress through. I think because of the core module, you understand the like we've talked about the main task at hand, and it's the death curse that sort of taking over the land. Right. So the the goal has been set. The the long the long conquest per se is already been established and you guys are well on it already. So I think that this campaign naturally would end one side quest is completed and whatever form the players choose, even if they choose to abandon it right like again, you mentioned a natural end to a story is when, you know, everybody sort of seems to be complacent with it or you know comes to a natural stop. Will if all the players, fellow you guys, suddenly chose Hey, there's not to be want to pursue anymore, well then that story ends and something new has to come from it if you guys want to keep playing. But in that sense, if that story, if that quest does conclude, then have a conversation with you guys if you want to continue playing those characters, if you want to take the moneywhere else, or we start a new story after that. HMM. Yeah, I'm kind of in the same boat as you, Braden, with my campaign that I'm creating here within wild mount so there is a setting, but what I'm doing is I'm using the backstories of people to kind of create a personalized like campaign. So it's got three acts where I'm like, okay, this is kind of who I want them to meet. You know, these are the kind of like things that they should do. They'll be the biggest hooks out there for them, specifically because I know they're designed for that characters backstory and it kind of makes sense for them to be drawn towards whatever affected them in the past. They can always choose to ignore it and there's other things out there for them to do, but I do have a kind of an idea of where it is going to lead and what they're probably going to end up doing. And then in the third act the idea will be to kind of resolve those those issues and then hopefully I'll be creating some sort of other way for them to become involved again with some other issue, or we can talk about ending it there. So that's what I'm working with. Okay, well, I think we'll leave it...

...there for this edition of dividing the DMG. Everybody listening? What do you think? What does your calendar look like? What events have you included in there? What does ending the game mean to you? What does it mean to end your campaign? Let us know at Royal City, society and Jordan, if you'd like to take it away my friend, critical thoughts okay. So for this one, I have planned to ask this question. Guys, it goes a little bit off of what we were last talking about. How does the main quest affect your world and what do you do if the players aren't interested in that main quest? well, keeping it fresh, since we just talked about this, the main quest exactly is something the how does the main quest affect the world in general? From my campaign, this death curse is affected everybody that has been reincarnated in the world. The players know this and because of that means most other people in the world also know this as well. It is affecting everybody. It's slowly outreaching in the way that I've portrayed, and news of it is being hurt heard from far off lands, so the common man knows about this. It definitely plays into maybe what certain characters and what certain NBC's actions might be, because they also are aware that they might have people that are now withering away that they've previously brought back to life. So it affects everything in a manner that keeps every character in this involved in this story aware and I definitely influence his decisions throughout. It's not a mechanic, however, that changes how characters interact with the world itself. But it is definitely something that everybody is aware about and everybody that might have some form of power to do something about it is planning or have some form of idea of what to do. I have to be really careful and yeah, I'm going to do this, because know how talk about yeah, exactly. I have to talk about how your characters might interpret this. So let's take this, take these conversations as this passive insight, but you might have in game. I would say this is hard. I feel like we talked about this previously. Just the idea that if my players don't want to do something, then I'm probably not. I'm not going to railrold them into doing it. HMM. So if I've got this great idea, that I think is a great idea, set up for a main quest and I'm constantly trying to like shoehorn this quest to make them really get into it, and they're not getting into it and I'm like, but guys, like, this is all I've planned, but they're like, but we want to do this, then I'm probably doing something wrong and I should probably step back and go well, how do I how would I write for what they actually want to play versus what we're playing. Right, do you maybe allow that main quest to just keep affecting the world still, or do you or you just kind of like you think and you probably just kind of set that aside and it builds towards something. That's the quest. It's been firmly established that this is something that is really affecting the world, and I've already said that, like this is what's happening and this is going to happen kind of regardless, like if it's if like somebody, they can for crast that on the assignment as long as you want. It's still going to be do at some point. That's a great analogy. It kind of going on in the background right now of the homebrew campaign that you're running in. Is this this bit of a civil war where this entire province has been annexed by rebels and they're still active fighting, and that's been going on and you guys have kind of walked through this active war zone before, so you're very aware of the fact that, like this is going on and you're very aware of the fact like you could do something, you could partake in this, like you know, people that are partaking in the fighting. So, and I'm not to say that like this is something that I would necessarily like to do a as like a full time bull. Focus point of this campaign is to just launch into like a war...

...in drink. Yeah, kind of focus, but it's that's something that's not going away just because you guys aren't paying attention. The war doesn't just stop because you write actively participating it. It's still happening and things are going to continue to result from that, whether you participate in it or not, and maybe other heroes will step up and take up the cost. Hey, probably not. Yeah, yeah, so, I mean I'm currently working on the main quests, as we just talked about, and so I'm kind of I'm kind of worried about, you know, if they aren't interested in that particular quest I mean, there's a bunch of other stuff going on in the setting that I can work towards, but I'm also kind of like, HMM, maybe I'll just kind of let these events then play out. So I'm kind of setting up like a calendar almost of okay, so if they haven't done anything by this point, then this is what's going to happen, you know, and then if they just continue to ignore the problems in this area, despite the fact that they are from that area or are related somehow to that area or to a person that's being affected by it, then say things are going to fall into place that are going to affect that area and it might end up spiraling farther than they want it to. But I'll see, I'll see what I do with that. But most like I'm not sure how much I want to like push it either, because if they really do want something else, then I don't want to take away from it by having this other thing going on at the same time. So yeah, so that was my critical thought for the day. I wrote down a bunch more during our talk today, but yeah, let's let's hear from everyone else again at Royal City Society. Tell us what your main quest have been like and if you've ever come across a situation where the players really weren't interested in whatever you were trying to sell as far as the world and the and the campaign went and what ended up happening, because I think it would be really good to hear different ways about how you can improvise or, you know what, different people are looking for. Yeah, so just shoot us a message. We love to hear from you guys, and thanks again for listening. I'm Jordan, the I'm with. That was a curvel hit. Yeah, I'm sorry, I thought I'd try it and just introduce this. What are you doing? I'm trying sell you. Do See the two guys very seas so thrown right now, like I'm Ron Bergen. Well, it's very nice for you to introduce yourself Jordan, at the end of the episode. See you next week.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (85)