Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 2, Episode 5 · 1 year ago

Ep. 16 - The First Encounter

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

How does player dynamic change between groups? Is it driven by the DM or the players. In this episode we talk about social dynamics in game, especially dealing with new parties. We continue our divination of the DMG and explore the various types of narrative styles. Finally, our critical thought of the week is discussed.

Hello, welcome everybody to the everdeveloping, still somewhat without a schedule, triple advantage podcast, your source ofall things tabletop role playing game, D D and so forth. I'm Carlos, and today we have Jordan and Braden yet again for another episode. Guys, hello, can't wait to the day that the viewers are not surprised tohear that it's both Carlos, Jordan and Braden on the place this week.Hey, got to keep everybody on their toes. I think another one isI'm surprised our viewers are still getting podcasts in general. So there's that forgood notes today for you, guys, we have same general structure as we'vehad for the past couple of weeks. We're going to in the later sectionsof the PODCAST, we're going to dive right back into the DMG, withbrain taking point on that, and Jordan has yet another critical thought. Hejust keeps coming up with them. It's just an endless font of creativity here, but more on that later. Right now, guys, I actually wantto talk to you about something really exciting. I started another campaign. I starteddeming another campaign for a brand new group of people, and this timeI actually curated the group a little bit. It wasn't just an open invite toour facebook group. It was more so picking out people that I knewwould maybe work well together and picking other people and but in general, likethe group, doesn't really know everybody else in the group too much. It'sfor people and I have the pairs of people essentially know each other, whichI which I thought would be a good idea with regards to getting some engagement. And you don't want to throw in a bunch of random people together andexpect them to interact right away. But in general I think the first sessionwent really well. I am running a hybrid version of the lost minds ofFan delver with dragon off ice spire peak, because they both take place in thesame city, so I figured May as well mix a match. Butyeah, with that in mind, guys, one thing that I really found interestingwhen dming was it was a completely different player experience. Right, itwas. It wasn't you guys, and not to say that there's anything inherentlywrong with you guys, because we tell each other that all the time,but it's just such a it was a different dynamic and it was kind ofNice. So I wanted to talk to you guys about that. Player dynamicsat the table and how you guys, within the first couple of sessions,maybe figure out the rhythm of your campaigns. Do you guys do anything in particular? Do you prep it or do you just kind of go with theflow and figure it out as you go? I'll let Braden go first on thisone, and you're asking from a DM perspective right now. From aplayer perspective? Oh, I'll open it up to a player perspective as well, but go for DM. Answer from the DM's perspective first. It's reallyit's tough to say because I the group that I play with contains a lotof the same people that are playing across several of our campaigns and that weplayed with as DM's and players in the past. So some of the dynamicsare already there and you just kind of have to let them happen. Ifind that a lot of the time it does have to do with how wellpeople know each other, because I know for my for my homebrew campaign,you'll get account of the boyfriend and the girlfriend pair always pairing up and agreeingwith each other on different things. The people the long time, like Dandveterans will occasionally pair up and have some more creative ideas versus some of themore recent players joining the campaign. Versus, I know, like in the campaignthat I run with you, Carlos, the hold of the Dragon Queen Campaign, you guys know each other, but it's not like not as closely, especially in a DD context, as they do in my homebrew campaign.So the dynamic is still like you guys are together as a party, butyou're not exactly you're not exactly having these like close groups of two or three. Were you really clicking with another player in a really exploring those avenues?So I don't I don't like to kind of impose my own ideas as tohow the dynamic should work. I like to just kind of let it workif it does. As a player pretty much the exact same thing. Ilike to kind of Suss out the group in my character and feel like who, what character does my character like dive with, like what? What's agood Mesh, and then I'll try and play off of that and if itkeeps working, then awesome. If it doesn't, back to step when ofwe dragon. And so for me,...

...okay, so I play in bothof your campaigns, for the most part I try to find out who mycharacter would be associated with most. For one of them was very difficult,but for the other one, my character is a bit more chaotic and itwas easier to find the chaotic person that was in line with that same characterMesh. My other campaign actually is really interesting because it I play it withmy three brothers and then some family friends that we've known for a long time. So the like, I guess, like we're all friends there, orare we known each other for a really long time? We know how weact and we know like all the little buttons that we can push to messwith each other in that kind of stuff. So it's really interesting to see thatcoming to play. It is true, actually, that a lot of thelike players will stick with whoever they know the most outside of game.I've always kind of found that, you know, that doesn't always work withyour characters, but people like to do it because it's it's it's it's reallife kind of crossing over right. Yeah, yeah, I think that that's withregards to the campaign that I just started, it's going to be likea for session campaign type of thing. It's just an introductory story, butone of the things that I definitely planned out initially was getting them to pairup, because one player was absolutely new to the game. The other onehad been playing for a couple of sessions, but nothing, nothing long term.So I thought it would be easier for them to create a care creakcharacters together and in the campaign they actually come from the same origin. Oneof them is a very royal blood type of person and the companion, whothe other PC that's playing it, is his guard. So it was reallyfun to just immediately have that our p element within the dynamic of the group. And again it's not I mean it's always up to personal preference. Asa DM, I guess if you want to maybe shoehorn certain people together,but I'm finding I'm finding a little bit more fun with with doing that inthe sense that there was very it was smooth, you know, the thefor a brand new player to come in. I think it was really helpful forthem to have a buddy to go back on and to have that tohave a rhythm already established with them on how they're going to at least interactwith one another in character, which really gave it gave half the group,you know, a sense of flavoring and the other half they kind of kneweach other as well. So the whole campaign with I think for me mygoal was how do we make adventures that are, you know, essentially meetingthem each other for the first time in a bar, for example, havethat sort of real in between player feeling of okay, we're just starting thisand we're all just meeting each other, but how do we not make itweird? So that's a little maybe I'm not maybe I'm not describing that wellenough there, but it totally makes sense. Like oftentimes like it's like it's likeusing Meta gaming a little a bit to bridge the in game to theplayer. You know, yeah, exactly. I so the campaign that I amabout to run I have two pairs as well that have kind of combinedback stories a little bit, which is awesome. It always makes for areally interesting RP like right off the bat, just because they have some sort ofhistory that they can go off of in character, and that really helpsto kind of kick things off. With my other campaign with my family,it's it was easy to get kicked off because we already knew each other andso there was already like that chemistry, like we knew how to act andwe knew how to, you know, be together or whatever, and wecould kind of pick up on different ques that way, when you really reallyknow each other, you can kind of get into that RP. But it'sa little bit more difficult and I definitely recommend, like, based on myexperiences, doing some sort of a shared backstory with someone. It's it's Idon't know, it's just better. I...

...think it was a lot more funas a DM to run in general. So I'll give you guys a littlebit of more detail. In this campaign, the the biggest things with regards tostarting it was getting those links stories sort of established before the first beforethe first session, even though the quest that they're running is like hey,adventures, here's some gold. Go get it right. But another thing thatI did, and this was more of a game mechanic choice, again fortrying to sort of mitigate this new player, this wall that you might have asa new player, is all the characters are actually at the Max hpthat they could possibly be for that level. I did not let them roll theirhit points. So, for example, one of the characters is a fighterand it's level three. So it has with the Constitution modifier and thelevel, I've given them all MAX HP. Each time you level up you're justgetting whatever maximum possible HP would have. So what the what? What thatdid, I think, is it lets them take a couple extra hitsand combat, you know, and that I found was critical when the thirdcomponent of this adventure comes in, which was actually running the monsters like theywould attack. You know, I had Goblin's. The first was it's lostminds of m delva. Right. So the first encounter was goblins and insteadof just hey, for goblins pop out and they're just shooting at you,it was hey, a volley of arrows comes out of no where and youcan't see anything because these goblins immediately went back into the shrubs. So theyhad to figure out how to find them. You know, it wasn't difficult,but there was that extra layer of difficulty in the combat which wasn't justI attack, they attack, I attack, and at first like level of oneencounter. So I'm really excited to see what this Max h people willlet me do as a DM, because I think I'll be able to moreeasily run multi attacks on opponents without worrying that I might excellently, you know, kill someone in session one or two right which I think was one ofthe more difficult things that I had, that I that I found, especiallyin the early days of Dming, I was fudging a lot or I wasfudging a lot of roles just because I didn't really know how to balance encounters, you know, interest. So I'm letting you guys know because I'll keepupdating the viewers and you guys as to the listener. Sorry, it's nota visual podcast yet, but it's definitely been a little bit more fun andI'm Ashall also running the average damage when monsters attack the PCS. I justtake the average instead of rolling each time. I found that it's speeds up alittle bit just to pace of play. But again, that's just a flavordecision on my part. But it's been pretty fun. Like as afor a first session, it was actually, you know, it ran really smoothand I think is like, I don't want to take my own hornhere, but like you can definitely feel the experience as a DM kind ofgrown. You know, the ability to sort of like pull the story alongis becoming so much easier now. Have you guys found that? I guesslike I know that. I know that we've been running pretty long term campaignsthroughout the majority of our dming. anyways, it's kind of hard to say it, but I think it was. It was nice to do this forme because the only other campaign that I really ran as one that I playwith you guys. So right, it's nice to see its progression. Whatdid dom what did your players think of the average damage? I don't know. I didn't tell them that. It's not a mechanic that the players needto know. I just told them how much damage they're taking. But wouldn'tthey figure it out after, you know, a couple shots hit and it's thesame damage every time? Yep, Yep. I think they made acomment with our darts to like expecting it. But I think again, it's kindof using that metagaming a little bit right, because if you know aGoblin is going to deal for damage a turn on average, then the threatlevel of a Goblin is almost immediately established as a player, right, right. So I don't know. I'll see how I might not continue to dothat, I don't know, but it was nice because it would. There'sa lot of Goblins, so I didn't want to be rolling for each attackeither. You know, I wanted to combat to move along because that's oneof the biggest pet peeves that I have. And not to knock it on breachingclear team, but combat, combat in general, takes a long time. Right. So I'm China, I'm as a DM. I'm trying tofigure out ways to drive a narrative but...

...also, you know, keep itmoving along, because it I find sometimes like that. Okay, let meroll for seven enemies. Tell you how, Holle you know, it breaks thepacing of the combat, or at least what I'm hoping to get outof it, and I think that's why. That's what I meant with the firstquestion. In a sense too, is like what kind of choices doyou guys make as DM? So keep that pace of play, you know, keep that that rhythm in your games. But I don't have you guys everdone anything like that any metagamy kind of hacks to players psychology. Iwouldn't say that necessarily. I tend to it just in terms of encounterbalance.I tend to especially when they're effacing waves. If it immediately looks like they're goingto just steam roll through this encounter. It's like, Oh look, threemore emerged from the rock back there. Not Not sure if that's particularly ahack or what we're referring to you, but it's something I've noticed. It'sit works not as well the other direction when you overload the encounter,because there's not much you can do that's case, except start pulling and punches. But definitely did that before. To you like the you make an encounter, you break it up into waves so you have a little bit more controlover what they're fighting. Sorry, what were you going to say? PutYou off? No, that's for that's pretty much it. I noticed thatthat tends to tends to, at least on my end, make it alittle easier, like if they're looking really, really rough, it's like, okay, maybe maybe there isn't two, three hiding behind that rock. Maybemaybe this is it. I've I've also, though, I'm guilty of letting playerchoices frustrate me, especially when they get really cocky and then I immediatelygo oh, you want to get cocky, here's all eight of the things thatyou're facing all at once, instead of the five and three separation Ihad originally planned. Have Fun. It's an interesting balance to write because Idon't know, there's there is that sense of a power dynamic as a DMright, like you don't want to be it's like you don't want to youdon't want to play and act as if you're this God in this game,but you technically are. To write. Like, but, like, Ifind that something. I've had moments where it like there's player that there's frustrationbetween player choice and like things, things like you're clearly metagaming and you knowthat this is a dangerous thing. Why are you trying to kill your character? Those are the things that frustrate me as a DM, and I thinkI've gotten a little bit better at handling that. This new group has isnot even in the picture there, but more so it's choices with certain charactersanother campaigns. Guys, it's like you're trying to die, and I guesslike this is that. Yeah, I mean personally, I I tell mygroups straight up beforehand, like I'm not going to pull the punches. I'msorry, guys, if you go in and you're fighting something that you can'thandle, run, just do it, like that's what you have to door don't fight them in the first place. Like, whatever you doing, I'mnot going to pull any punches here. So if your characterize, your characterdies, like that's it. I think. I think I hit oneof the hardest moments that I had when dming. To be honest, wasin tim of a dilation when half the party got petrified. I don't fuckto do as a DM because at that moment, if you guys would havechosen to continue fighting, you would have died for sure. Yeah, butI can't tell you that right I can only allude to it so much.You know I mean as one of the petrified characters and that I kind ofhave the gift of hindsights because I was in that follow up session. ButI feel like, especially for our group of experience characters, you walk intoa room, half your party is instantly petrified and there's not at least alittle voice going like, Oh, maybe this is a dumb idea, thenyou get what's coming to you. But I think that that's that's that's whereI'm trying to get to, at least my personal goal as at d M, is to find that nice little nichetion between the metagame and the character choicesand the player choices, that that connection of this is dangerous, you know, because there is a disconnect between a player and his fictional character going intoa room and it's Oh, a Medusa, you don't know that, right.Oh, I froze half the party,...

I can still do it because I'mthe hero in this story. Well, only so much. So it's that'sthat's where the balance, I think this little balance comes from, right, because, like, I want to keep a story going, but eventshappened that petrified half the party. But if the players want to attack thethe remaining creatures, I have to let them, right, even though Iknow it will end the story. So it's true and it's a weird balance. Yeah, yeah, one of the potentials might be to a foreshadow,I guess, I guess, the power of this creature or whatever, orwhatever thing you're about to run into, whether that's through different like books thatthey've come across or if they actually see it like absolutely obliterate something. It'llhelp to like paint that picture in their head like Oh, maybe we shouldn'tdo this, you know, even if like you don't obviously have to,like you don't do that for all things, but like if you were to dothat kind of stuff, it might be something that that the players mightbe able to do figure out, like Oh yeah, maybe we should haveyeah, yeah, absolutely, and I think it's that information delivery as well. Right. I like that's one of those encounters that I thought saying lifelikestatues often enough would have been really direct us to what you're encountering. ButI was leveraging player knowledge, not character knowledge, and I think that wasmy fault as a DM, because you are supposed to find out, orat least elude that it is a medusa that you're fighting or you're going tofight. But again, it's just I didn't know how to handle the situationup until that point. Yeah, so you almost have to like make NPC'sthat are more powerful than them, than the party, and then run themin and have them get obliterated and then make a new NBC. That's somehowit gets entangled with them every time you have something like that. Yeah,yeah, but yeah, I you know what this could this this conversation.You can continue. I think we've taken up enough time with this a shortdiscussion, but next week I'll talk to you guys a little bit more aboutthat, which is more so how do you deliver exposition in a story todrive that narrative even for even further? So we'll get to that next week. I think it's a pretty good time to move on to our next segment. Braden Carlos, all right, I'm distracted now. I'm excited for thatnext conversation. Let's take a look at the dungeon master's guide. Last timewe met we discussed play style and balancing between hack and slash type combat,just kind of nonstop wall to wall, go, go, go, calmat all the time, versus immersive storytelling, more episodic and focused on the innerstruggles of the different characters and how you can make that come to lifein your games and where the balance is, where you the balances in each ofour campaigns. This week we're going to take a look at some someideas to get some things flowing in how you might decide had to run yourcampaign. The first thing that we're going to talk about is character names,and I find it interesting because it's talking about how everybody should kind of beon board with names, kind of as an extension of what the theme ofthe adventure is it mentions. You could have names like a seeth, thistrey voc, I'm not going to try and pronounce that third one, Chiron, stuff like that, and then it's naturally going to look pretty weird whenBob Rolls Up to join the adventures. A little lot of place. TheMaje Man, Aka the Majument, not what I was thinking of, butI was thinking of the same players, previous druid character who walked in withbill. Remember we had Phoenix? No Way, it wasn't. We hadbill. Yes, because after we derided him, he decided that it wasbill with three L's. Since that the MAGEMENT's not a bad example as well, but I'm trying to think of any that we've had in our recent campaignsthat just kind of don't Mesh as much. I will say the made man iskind of a wild name, but on the same time the background forthe sorcer is bulk hero, so I think that's okay in that sense,as like the addressed name this person,...

...and I think if, if thiscant, if this campaign continues further than just the Tomb of annihilation storyline,will explore some of that a little bit. There's some plan in mind with reguardingyour actual character back stories, because you guys, some of you guys, have given me actual threads to pull on, which is, you know, really fun for me. But yeah, I think we've had a character that'shad a couple of quarter life crisis and this page seems a couple oftime, which is also been interesting. But yeah, I actually didn't thinkof that too much, Braden, because I ever like when I think ofa character creation, when I think of naming things right, like for me, it's pretty easy to just say, yeah, I'm making a real characterin this world, but as a player, right, like the options are,Hey, I'm making someone fun that I want to play ass right,of course I want to name them Johnny with a silent x Jordan. Doyou experience this at all in your campaigns or is there they are pretty justjust the previous examples. I've been in both of those campaigns. Oh,I know, a bunch of people like putting in like punny names. Oh, sometimes those can can really bug me. In what way? I'm curious nowwhoa okay, like so one one character was Ling Guenie. I hateit. Yeah, I'm sorry, I asked Sweeney family has been established inwater deep for a long time. As a as a brief aside, thisis tangentially connected at best, but I don't know if I'll get another chanceto tell this on the air. I have the same character that plays bothbill and the Maje man. His current name is not so much a name. We refer to him as jl because he plays his character as having Turette'sbecause of course he does. Of course, and in the delivery of his namehe starts he goes yes, my name is and then it devolves intoa series of explatives and on his character sheet when he gave it to me, it said Jay and then three explatives and then l. So we juststarted referring to him as jail. And then I give them a hunter's permit, which is something that they need in this fictional universe in order to completeofficially sang and bounties, and actually went through and I printed off like physicalhunters permits for them to have, just as kind of like a fun thingthat we were doing. I was like yeah, you just need to signit as your character and everybody was signing it and he's sitting there pensively.I was like, what's wrong? Mean a pennies? Like no, I'mjust trying to decide if I want to sign this with my real name ornot. Somebody your real name is like, well, that's not my real name. I was like, well, what's your real name? Is like, I haven't told anyone. He had. I'm like, but you should tellme. I'm the M. Yeah, let's just going. Let's do aquick interjection here and a PSA to all seven or ten audience members thatwe have. You are not playing against the DM. Yeah, yes,you're also not playing with the DM. The DM is just there to getthe game moving. If you have if you have story hooks that you wantto throw into the campaign, let your DM know. This is not ansecret. You're not pulling surprises on the DM, because it's hard to drivea narrative if all of a sudden you have this other long lost family andinsane background that you're suddenly pulling out and I have to improvise on. Letme establish that in the world with you. You know you're not again players,please. You are not playing against anybody in this game other than thetasks and very well, said very well, and I say that because I don'twant to say you're not playing against at DM, you're playing against otherplayers. That's not true either. You're collaboration is key, and that's actuallysomething that I did with this new campaign. I took them in. I startedthem out in the same way I did in the Tumb of annihilation withthe adventure is guilt, except the little...

...anecdote that I gave the NPCU was, hey, you guys are a new party. Let me give you someadvice. Stay together. So that is good advice. It was a wayto, you know, sneak Meta game into, you know, a reasonablesetting, right, like, Hey, this guy's giving people quest these guysclearly don't know each other. Let me give you some advice. New AdventuresArt. I feel like I was sidetracked this entirely. Let's move on.Next step. We've got whether you want to run a continuing campaign or anepisodic campaign. Now I think that what's the three of us run would generallybe considered continuing campaign. So continueing campaign being you kind of move along witha large arc type idea. I'm that's you're kind of like like the storyis one continuing story versus an episodic campaign. Think of like an a like somethingout of like a s cartoon or something, where every week it's thesame characters back with the same dynamics, but every week is like a completelydifferent, disjointed story that they're going on, kind of like, kind of likehow I kind of run one shots when you guys bring back the samecharacters. Yeah, I think that generally our campaign's collectively would be considered continuing, but they have any of you ever run an episodic campaign? Or wouldyou? I would actually and I'm actually planning on building a larger scope,but this goes in general for just the Royal City Society as a whole.The ability to be able to create a character and just jump into a storythat somehow it ties in to this grander world is really exciting to me andI think, like you mentioned right, it is more like a show,like each session the characters go on some form like some long form adventure thathas a resolution at the end of the session. Now, mind you,I think that that does require a little bit more time commitment, because evennow I would be hard pressed to create a full and each narrative with likea two hour time slot. I feel like that kind of episodic campaign mightrequire, you know, three hours, four hours of playing, which noteverybody's willing to sit down and do just so, just so you can exploremore than just the one dungeon, you know. But yeah, keep thinkingthat engine in two hours. Yeah, and that's what I mean right,like it's it. I would I would be hard pressed to do that without, you know, these big sort of wipe cuts per se. So youjust finished this room and now you went back to the in and handed,like. I mean, you work out with the players. Maybe that couldwork. That could be some good pacing for a story, but I wouldprefer to have more game time, I think, to you know, starta story and finish it like, like it like. I mean I justthink of like Lord of the Rings for examples, like all these things arekind of like one, one one, like like the first Lord of theRings, right, like you start in the Shire and you move along andall of that takes place in like three hours. I feel like you coulddo that in a campaign, but you need that time, you know,to establish an initial plot, to establish, you know, some mid story andthen a climax and then a finish. Otherwise you don't have a story right, and I think that would be key for an episode of campaign.Is You need to have a story each time you play other as it's justpull. Well, what they accomplish, I don't know. Yeah, exactlyit would. It's it would have to be a pretty planned out campaign andit would have to be like I'd almost like avoid dungeons in general for somethinglike that and just have like smaller battles because battles take so long, andthen try and have some sort of like, I don't know, like meety storyin there instead of combat. If I were to do an episodic campaign, that might be where more of a like and sorry, what's it called? The storytelling, immersive storytelling type of campaign might be more suited for anepisodic type of thing than like a hackenslash. So moving on to our less section. It talks about the campaign theme, and when I read this the firsttime, I figured it meant theme almost like a genre, like isit a horror setting? Is it a fantasy setting, or what's the nowtheme more meaning, like what's the what's...

...the deep kind of idea that's underpinningall this? Is the idea related specifically to mortality. And actually looking athim. Of Annihilation. I think that is a really good example of that. To the idea of these these undead or previously having being resurrected, peoplenow dying again. And what are you going to do about that? Howare you going to stop, essentially, how are you going to stop deafcampaigns revolving around evil and Intrinsic Evil at the center of everything, not justfocusing on outside features, but campaigns focused on the players themselves, in theplayers being troubled, like maybe that's the theme, via the flaws within theheroes. And how would one run that, essentially, and I think that's thelast thing we're going to discuss. So my question Visa v that wouldprobably be would you guys identify a theme in any of your campaigns right now? I don't think I can. The campaign I just started, for example, is just brand new. There's no general theme associated to that yet.I think from a DMS perspective into annihilation, I guess a theme would be likeDungeon delving at this point, but I wouldn't necessarily put it like agood and evil type thing. I'm not sure. I'm hard pressed to findthat. I think about that it's hard to put us as a good andevil type thing when like half the party is not good. Well, Imean more so, like I it's one of those realizations that I've had whereI think maybe the gravity of wire on this quest hasn't been emphasized enough.These are just things that I kind of notice based on retention of information,for example, like players, like the big ticket item here is like thesoul monger, and each time it's like what is that again? Like fucked, and I why that name does not stick with me. They knows it, but the name is does not, and it's not to your fault orto anything. It's just I think, like as a DM, I havenoticed that we're getting to this point in the campaign where you're very close tothe final act per se and we still don't know what we're really looking for. You know, it's it's a iterative things that I try to work on. But you were going to say something, Jordan. Yeah, so with mycampaign that I'm building on wild mounts, I actually asked the players ahead oftime what they were expecting out of the campaign and what kind of thingsthey would like to see, and so I've kind of used that as likethere their responses to that as a way to build a theme for them.So I don't want to like give away too much on that kind of stuff, but I've used the answers that they gave in order to build a themethat I think kind of matches what they were looking for. And then alsoI've noticed some of the things that they put into their characters and I thinkthat I will start to use that as part of the theme as well,or as almost too, two separate themes that are running at the same timeand I can introduce both of them at at at different times. So Ireally like the idea of having a theme because it kind of makes it feellike a story, like there's one story that the that the group is kindof following. Mid I'm more of a planner than I am an improviser,so that kind of makes sense why I would enjoy that kind of stuff.So yeah, that that's kind of I don't want to say too much.I want to, but I don't want to. That's okay, like I'llbe updating you guys with new chapters of that new campaign that I'm running,as it happens, you know, and a retro and, like you maybeyou can talk about it retroactively like I have in with him annihilation. Idon't think I've been spoiling anything with the conversations we've been having, but Ialso I'm not going to tell you guys what comes next. You know,man, no inside or details on triple advantage. If that's what you're expecting, you guys got to go find it somewhere. US whole reason I'm here. But if you do want insider information on the things that we were releasing, go check out our instagram page at Royal City Society. We're publishing contenton DM's guild semi consistently and we'd love...

...for you guys to go check itout and give us any feedback that you guys have. It's all narrative,it's all for fun, so don't be afraid to just check out what wehave and, you know, Haula at us if you have any concerns orcomments or whatever. I don't know, how do you engage with people onlinewhen you record previously and then you post a day later? Strange, butanyways, go do that, all right. Continuing on off of that, Ithink that that brings us to an end of divining the DMG for thisweek. While you're over there checking out our stuff at Royal City Society,leave a comment on the post for today's episode. How do themes factor intoyour campaign? What are the themes? Tell us a fantastically hilarious character namethat you've had run in your campaign or that you've had as a character.But now I think it's time to move on, Mr Jordan. Yeah,all right. So going on to critical thoughts, guys. All right,so for this week I'm going to go off of the theme that we weretalking about a little bit with Carl this earlier and session ones and stuff likethat. So for you guys, do you DM differently for new players asopposed to experienced ones, and, if so, like what kind of changesdo you make? I'll answer and say that I don't DM differently for othergroup, but I have made drastic changes to how I dm at certain pointsof a story or between sessions. Maybe, as I'm running a campaign, Iread something interesting that I think I can introduce, so I do that, but I don't tend to DM in a different flavor between groups. Ithink maybe that's part of the allure of a DM in a sense. Right, like you, have your the unique the unique take on a story thata particular DM might give you. I think is part of the art ofthis game in general. Right, you wouldn't necessarily say, Oh, thisperson, you know, you know, like, for example, I likepersonally, right, like my DM style is definitely a hybrid of other DMSthat I've seen and other things that I that I've that I want to incorporate. So, you know, little things like everybody saying how you want todo this, right, and like maybe that became more popular because Matt Mercerand critical role, but it's such a great line to give a player,right, like it's such a great and engaging thing to say to someone.Hey, you just saw the monster. How do you want to kill this? Right, get that Saratonin bump. When? When? When? Whenyou get that choice, you know, it's like, Oh, this isn'tjust an attack, it's, you know, cooped a gross Kuda Gras. Idon't know it was butchered. Sorry any French speakers out there, butand then I have a little Mike merls in there. I think that's whenI started introducing the rule for either perception or insight. You know, youwill determine different aspects of this story based on that choice. And I saw, I think it was heroes of the veil when I started watching Mike Morlesdo that and then just after watching him and how his little happy fun hourthat I like. Sadly it doesn't happen as often anymore, but seeing himand how he thinks out like balancing mechanics in game has definitely influence a littlebit on how I develop mechanics in game. And Yeah, so it's I thinkit's like any form of art really with regards to you know, youmight draw your musical inspiration from a certain artist, right in the same waythat you draw, you know, game mechanics that you like to use fromother dms and from other things you've seen. I don't know that's that. It'smy take on it. I think I've found a little niche on how, you know, I talk and how I expect it, like a howexplain situations. But I don't know what about your Brat, I'd echo prettymuch the same thing. I don't change up my style really from campaign tocampaign and I do also tend to echo a lot of my influences and Ithink we have pretty much the same influences for the most part. I willsay anecdotally that is occasionally to my detriment because when I do have new players, especially new players that are coming in to an experience session like we recentlyhad, I really don't slow down the...

...pace at all for them when Iprobably should, and it's a lot of kind of whiplash on their end whenthere's suddenly being tossed into this and I'm just like throwing out words that areprobably meaningless buzz words to them that everybody else is seeming to pick up onright and it's it's definitely something I feel like I do need to be abit more compassionate in that regard, just towards the fact that they probably don'thave much of an idea what's going on beyond the very, very basics.But I don't know, it's it's something I'm not fantastic at yet, forsure. I don't Jordan, what about your where's your dam inspiration from?Do you change it up? I I'm definitely have the opposite problem as Braden. There I think I might change up things a bit too much. Whereif there's a new player in the group or new players plural, I definitelytake it a lot easier on them with regards to just everything. I leteverything slide. My D my NPC's are a lot dumber or the DC's arelower or anything along those lines, just to kind of like give them theidea, I guess, of success and kind of give them an idea oflike this is how the game is run and you don't have to worry toomuch about these kind of things yet and hopefully down the road I start toget a little bit more like, okay, now your experience, I'm going tostart increasing the difficulty here. It's it's not. It's not very gooddming, I don't think, because if I am like changing the difficulty basedon how many or how many new players are are and that kind of thing, than it kind of you know, I don't think the DM is supposedto do that. I think if they're really running a story, that thedifficulties shouldn't change at all. But I can't help myself so and I think. And then it goes all back to that general conversation that we had,which is just how do you get your players, and especially new players,to engage with the story right if they're failing at every moment. It's notgoing to be fun exactly. But at the same time I could see thatbeing the case as well if you have a mix of players and it's clearthat certain actions by some party members have seemingly succeeded more often than others.So do you change like DC's between, you know, players in one sessionor do you do it in separate sessions and stuff like that? Well,so I would definitely like I would set the DC to be the same forthe group at that time. But if there are new players in the group, then it the whole difficulty for everyone kind of decreases, and so itjust like, I don't know. I think for the experience players, ittakes a little bit away for them because, you know, they've seen success andthey know what that feels like and they know all that kind of stuff, and so sometimes failure being added in their kind of adds to their likeanticipation or or fear or kind of like oh no, like what's going tohappen? I don't know, a little bit of anxiety there, which canget your blood pumping and, like you know, that's how they can gettheir rush, whereas I think the new players, like you know, theydon't want to be like, oh no, I fail the now the group islooking at me like I did something bad, you know, or thatkind of thing. So I don't know what the right mixes there to yet. I'm still kind of feeling it out. So yeah, and then for sure. I mean I like, for example, right like in the inthe session that I ran for this new campaign, one Goblin ran away andonce they got to cragma hide out, I just had the goblins that wereon guard be sleeping. Objectively right, that one GOBLIN would have ran andwarned everybody. But at the same time, what they have right like it likein early level campaigns, very like. Is a Goblin just going to runaway? Maybe I don't know. So maybe that's what I'm telling myselfas a DM, that I didn't change difficulty settings for the module based onnew players. But I think in general right, it got everybody excited.And, for example, you, do you guys remember who was? Wasit any of you that ran lost mines? I think I definitely brain. Yeah, I was in that. Was it you, Jordan? Yeah,I think I was in that one. I don't know if I ran it. No, I don't know. I'm talking about like when I dmed itthe first time. Yeah, I'm I'm pretty sure I was part of itas well. Yeah, well, because...

...of certain narrative changes and how Iexplored it, we're able to get through the CRAGMA hide out in one session, which I wasn't able to do the first time I dmmed it. wasthat there someone where I was one of those like last standers, and therewas the one bug bear left over in the in one of the mines orwhatever. Yeah, yeah, who, yeah, it was. Actually thatbugbear encounter was really funny because the druid that was playing did a thunderwave anddid fifty and like kill, kill two goblins and dealt so much damage tothe bug bear in one turn that it wasn't able to get that much damage. And I objectively speaking, a bug bear really crits every time it hitsright. So it's kind of nasty. But I'm going to leave that oneas a surprise for players when they do get hit by the bug bear thefirst time. But, like I'm saying, like it's just I don't know,I didn't change the difficulty of the encounter in general. I just youknow, they didn't interact with the wolves. They kind of just let them be. So okay, we don't have to run that combat encounter. Theymanaged to scare or pretend that there was a giant monster in the cavern thatprevented certain goblins from moving forward and I don't know, just in general asa DM, it was nice to see that I can run that kind ofdungeon in one session and just get through with it, because I really wantedthem to get the fan dollar by the end of the first encounter the firstsession, but I didn't want to change page how the encounters within the hideoutwere to facilitate that. Right, and kind of this works into what youwere saying right, like I didn't want to make the goblins all of asudden too stupid, right. I just established a level of stupid and kindof stuck with it. Yeah, I can't help but think like so.Recently I re watched community and I keep thinking, like you know, allbedin, that show runs dungeons and dragons, I think twice through at the season'sand every time he's like super like, nope, these are the rules.That's it. I don't care if you've played before, if you knowwhat you're doing. You know this, this is what happens. That's IT, period, end of story, and that's kind of cool to to mebecause it's like, Oh yeah, like real world consequences, like if youdo something, there will be something that happens to you, whereas like,I think I might tend to like fudge things just to make it easier onpeople, and I'm like yeah, maybe not so great. I remember Iwas actually watching that episode earlier today because so doing probably the thing didn't watch, but one of the quotes at the very end really got to me becauseat the end of that episode he they take too long arguing out front ofthe big bad m only burst in. He's left through the back door.Yeah, he's like sorry, that's it for the session and one of theplayers just goes like you can't do that, like you o us an ending,and he goes, I don't know you anything, like I create aworld and that world has consequences. For example, if you stand out herefighting each other for an hour arguing about who gets to kill the guy insidethe tower, the guy inside the towers going to leave through the back door? HMM. And I just remember, like we had one session, onetime where these guys did not end up really it was a one shop thatthey didn't end up arriving really at the destination they would have wanted to.They didn't. They defeated the evil person, but they never really found what theywere looking for within this house that they were exploring. And I'm boardslike we were packing up. It was like, Yep, good session,guys, and somebody was like well, what what should have happened? waslike, you have no idea, you can't tell us, like you gotta. I was like, I absolutely cannot tell you. You you made choicesthat resulted in not figuring out. That's right, I was so bad andthis wasn't you. Actually, this was another session, but but it's like, yeah, the choices that you made have led us to this particular ending. Like this isn't a video game. You don't just get to go backand figure out what you did wrong and do it again, like this wasthe adventure. The adventures over. But going back to that, to thedivining the DMG segment and that last section of episodic verses along form story,I'll disagree with you. I'll say that in a one shot, if you'redoing a like an episodic kind of thing. There should be a some sort ofresolution, right, like maybe, maybe we'll disagree on that, butit's more so unlike the player reward as well, right, like I wouldn'twant to slog through three hours of of game to not kill the big Baddie. You know, if we're continuing the...

...story, that entices me to comeback to the table, but if I know it's a oneshot, then okay, like, I wouldn't do that, personally, I don't think. Butagain, like Duran's question said, like every DM is different, right,like. It's just what flavor of table do you want to have? Youknow, if we show up to Braden's table, you know, clearly theseconsequences are established and that might be a way of playing that you really enjoy. Right. I think it's interesting. It's interesting especially because we play witheach other, and that sounds really super sauce, especially since we especially sincewe run DND games with one another from time to time. It's interesting tosee how our dming styles have evolved a little bit. Like I personally likeI like to do more of the Improv style of running an adventure, becauseit's fun for me as a DM all right, but there are something tosay about planning and knowing what your campaign has to hold, right. Yeah, for sure, I don't know. It's it. That's a really openquestion. I feel like we could talk about that for our go a longtime, just like every other topic on triple advantage. Yeah, but fornow I think we've talked enough about it. Thank you for answering guys. Thishas been critical thoughts on triple advantage with Royal City Society. Again,thanks to all the listeners out there. We just want to say, youknow, send us a message, let us know what you think and we'lltry and respond to you and maybe put some of the stuff that you sayon on our next podcast. So, yeah, send us a DM atRoyal City Society on our instagram account and we'll see you guys all next week. I'm Jordan, I'm Carlos and I'm still Braden. Man, I don'tknow about this ending, guys. Okay, you can just cut it then Iwill not. This is all coming and lovely hold. See you guysin a couple of days.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (85)