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Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 3, Episode 13 · 1 year ago

Ep. 40 - Stop The (Darrington) Presses!

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this week's episode of Triple Advantage, there is a new press release - the Darrington Press, that is. We then press on to our thoughts on adventure structures, and finally we wrap things up in a duel between martial and spellcasting classes.  

On this week's episode of triple advantage. There is a new press release, the DARRINGTON press. That is then we press onto our thoughts on adventure structures and finally, we wrap things up in a duel between Marshall and spellcasting classes. As always, follow our social media to see what we have planned. Enjoy the show. On today's echoes of the Outland, we're going to take a closer look at the DARRINGTON press, the newest venture by our wonderful friends. We don't actually know them. That's a big lay friends. They're they're very friends with their community, by our wonderful friendliest members of the community, critical role guys. Have you read anything about this? Yes, critical role is expanding beyond the realm of strictly DD v content into board games and the like. I'm excited. I want to hear everybody else's thoughts before we delve into mine, though. I am actually really excited about a few of these games. It's there. A lot of them look pretty interesting and I'm kind of excited to see how they implement some of the critical role stuff into it. Just to get like the extra like Oh, Easter Higgs, hmm. Yeah. Well, I think that it's really interesting. I think that it's as we're seeing these online communities grow, and even not just in the critical role TT RPG space, but we're seeing everybody venture, that we're seeing everybody's ventures expand into other realms of art. Right. You look at some youtubers that are now like constantly producing music, right, which is always interesting to see, and then you're seeing groups like this and this case critical role, it makes perfect sense that they would start expanding into the actually like the Physical Board Game World, which brings a couple of interesting questions to my head. For one, right now, I guess critical role and met Marcer have been working closely with wizards of the coast to produce and publish, for example. Ever, are not a brown wildmounts, wild mount are they going to maybe internalize that and eventually will see critical rule publish their own books, like they have with their world of critical role, but in but like I know that by that I mean like their own game books, Um, and I'm interested to see where that might develop in the future. But for now we get some board games. So a couple things to note here. DARRINGTON press was or is headed by Ivan Been Norman, and if you've been watching critical roll. If you've been seeing their streams, you're you've definitely seen who he is. Of course, Matt Mercer is heavily involved in this and together, and I'm assuming, with the help of the extended support team over a circle role, they're going to bring us a new board game, quarter one of two thousand and twenty one, called a Yukutoha. You COULTA seems to be. You Coulta, you could tea seems to be a card small strategy game. It seems like it's about an at an hour's worth of play on like if you're really stretching it, I would assume with like twelve, three to five players, age twelve plus, each game should run about thirty, forty five minutes rout. From the images it looks like it's already set to go and good for publishing. So do you think the our local game store might see this? Oh Yeah, oh for sure. I've actually so. I know that a lot of our listeners come from Wealth Ontario's so I don't mind just saying the dragon and assuming that people know what we're talking about. The dragon our local games shop. I walked in there a year and a half ago. I want to say. And basically I had ordered back when critical role was producing their miniatures. I had ordered our these are miniatures from steamforge games, and I ended up getting two of them. I can't remember why they'd accidentally sent me two of these miniatures. So I was like, I don't need too so I hit up Roberts, the lovely, lovely owner of what...

...the Dragon, saying Hey, I've got two of these miniatures. Do you want to buy one? And at the time he was like let me get back to you, because I'm aware that the fact that critical role is a thing, I don't know a lot about it, and since that it's absolutely exploded in popularity. They're carrying all their stuff that they can. I got the minis, they got the books, they got everything. It's always interesting to me seeing this because I think one of the one of them, the strongest points for these communities that have been built out of the Internet is that initially there's I don't mean to be I mean to say this in a derogatory manner, but like the there there seems to be like a like a middleman in most already established industries. Right like you have bizzards of the coast going through publishers, then going through to distributor or like the publishers handle the distribution side, and then eventually it goes out to the local game stores. But you with with Internet community, seems like people, and eventually just start with okay, I'll I've have an audience and I'm going to start merch and you start creating shirts and you start selling almost directly to your audience, like especially people that are doing like drop shipping and whatnot. Right. So it's interesting now that all these industries are getting a little bit bigger, or sorry, not industries, but groups are getting a little bit bigger and bigger. And now that like it's it would be impossible for the team of critical role without like extensive distribution experience to hit worldwide deliveries. Right. So now these middle men per se are getting added back into the equation, which is really exciting to see. I mean I'm glad that they're able to create such waves that they now need, you know, their own extended corporate support per se to actually like get these really high quality products out to all of their interested fans. I I think another side of this too that's really interesting. I am I guess there was all this stuff out there pre five year and during V that was not necessarily V content but that was directly tied to it. So stuff like books about prominent characters within the for gotten realms and stuff like that, like in stories versus actual playable content. And I never, I never saw any of these, but I know our good friend Matt apparently read quite a few when he was younger and even now. Like I'm not, I don't, I don't care. I'M NOT gonna pick up a book about like I can see. I can't even think of a character name from forgotten realms. But critical role, like really you, you care, and they're not even publishing stuff exclusively about, you know, the mighty nine. I'm working at their future game releases and I'm seeing, you know, syndicult mob families fighting it out of her jealous secrets, guardians of matrimonial like these aren't these aren't vox mocking our the mighty nine, like these are ex critical role, expanded universe, for lack of a better term, and I care, and I think the fans care, which is like I am starting to get why. Well, it's what brow you erow. It's all brought you into the genre, in my opinion, right, like that's that's why you care. I'm sure to see us some older DD vets. They probably care about, you know, the Grayhawk Adventures and all the other older first edition, Third Edition Games and characters, right, and you could see that even with Matt Mercer Right, like the campaign that they made and the inclusion of all the characters from the forgotten realms and their characters. Seem to also care about that, and that sort of by proxy, spurred on. You know, all of a sudden people cared about Vechna. WHO's VECNA? Right, like these new players that may have never actually been exposed to those characters that were created by wizards of the coast. You're ready. I think it's interesting that. I think critical role might be one of the first like groups of player characters that have kind of made waves, though, too, because there are lots of like there's lots of like monsters or or deities and that kind of thing that might be out there that you can get information on, that have been written over the years for Dungeons and dragons, but critical role might be the first one that actually has like, Oh, I want to learn more about I don't know, like like Veath or Vo Vex from the critical role campaign, and you can kind of go they might actually be able to make like characters or books that kind of include a little bit of the backstory of these different characters or, you know, have them as something that you can include in your adventures or something like that. They're becoming like famous people in the...

...history of dd that aren't just things that are, you know, written about, but people actually know about as well. Does that make sense? I wouldn't argue that they're the first, but I will are, yeah, among the first, I think, and I have no official official data to back this up, less or in from completely just talking off the cuff here. When I think of the first player character people took an interest in, I think of Urk on the cruel, Joe Manganello's Dragon Ball. Yeah, I've never heard of that. I'm actually I am actually surprised. So Joe Manganello, fairly prolific actor, among other things, is a very noted nerd and he talks in his interviews at length about how much of a nerdy is. He has like an entire DD dungeon set up in his basement because just just so we can play with his voice and he would come in and he would talk about, you know, our Khon the crew, who actually did make it into critical role for a while and from there actually did make it into an official DD source book in descent to Avernus, and I think that it was important that he was doing that because that kind of brought it out of the space of, you know, this just all these Weirdos talk about this and then it's like not like this. Yeah, is a prominent actor who's standing up and talking about this, and then it's like, oh wait, like regular people play this game too, like it's not just from Weriros in their basements, like people used to think in the sea. If I would class by German well as a regular person, and I got were even even more prominent in that case, because he's not. He's he's Joe Manganello and the and he's also got a emerged line of metal inspired DD clothing. A death stays, shadow death stays. You have one of their shirts, don't you? COPS? I do, actually coins it isn't. It's the back. No one. I thought it look cool. It ties in with the topic, but I think, yeah, I think that it's starting to show that like it started to snowball from there. You know it's it's you're starting to see people who are prominent, like Joe and like the people from critical role, because the people from critical role, most of them at least, were decently prominent within their own community, even if not in the the the huge spotlight of the world. But like Matt Mercer was a quite a famous voice, actor Travis, most of them actually, we're quite prominent and seeing people like that stuff, we're going to go like no, this is something really cool, like you'd start to you start to take a vested interest in their characters, the same way I think most people would take a vested interest in like our celebrities regular life. It's just kind of a transference of that attention in the limelight onto the hobby itself versus onto the person. True, and I remember, actually this makes a little bit more since now, because I remember I was on Linkedin a couple of weeks ago and I actually remember seeing the they posted a job for essentially like a creative. I forgot it was. It was a for product development, essentially for Product Development Menagrement, and I can only imagine that this is tied in directly with their their announcement here right like these games probably were developed or the priority, the ideation stage of these projects was probably these board games. was probably a year, two years ago maybe, I would imagine, with like playtesting and whatnot, and then they're looking to beef up their distribution team. So I can only imagine that this is already rather established within critical role and although they only have four announced games at the moment, were likely going to see, and by the way, this is the games that are announced. Our yukultoah coming out in q one, two and twenty one, then critical role adventures coming out Q to Two thousand and twenty one, syndicult q three, two thousand and twenty one and guardians of Matrimonia, Q for Two thousand and twenty one. So this is for announcements for games that they're releasing in one year and this is their first set of releases. So I am very interest to see how many other games are in the idea stern stage right now, being right for two thousand and twenty two, and I can only imagine that they already have that. And this gets me excited to see more and more critter content out in the world. Because it directly impacts how large of a community we can reach,...

...which is phenomenal. Keep at it critical role, the letting the little guys, you know, let us get that that trickle down entertainment. It's so I mean jokes aside, though, that's exactly what's happening. Like people, I don't think people really took this kind of stuff seriously before. They prove that you can do this pretty much for a living. Yeah, like, I don't think we'd be doing this that they weren't already doing what they were doing. It's definitely let me absolutely clarify that. I am no way, shape or form trying to relate this to any form of economic practice. That may or may not possible. Definitely doesn't work. Yeah, now we make no money, but but yeah, it's just interesting because I like the pocket that they've created for other creators. And you can see them both if you're making critter art, right, lots of cosplayers getting a lot of traction, for example, you know borreguard cosplace, if you've seen, pretty popular, right, because you're creating these characters that people want to embody and that's it. I love the I love the strength of the way that they've created across not only the tabletop community but the cosplay community and other artistic developments. Right, like Braten, I should a song with you a couple of weeks ago. There's actually from a local, not local but like on Ontario, artist Lily Furfurro, which got massive positive feedback from the critter community. She made us a couple of songs for every single character in the mighty nine and they're like, as you said, Briton like. They're just so joyful and happy and there's so much relation to her artwork personally tying in with this, with this world that met mercers created. So, yeah, it's extremely exciting seeing more of their creations coming to to the public eye, because I'd love to play something like you couldah with our regular friend group and most of them wouldn't play anything that's DND related, right, but if we get them to play you could teah. Maybe we can explain why, and then one thing leads to another and we get them to join the Royal City Society and suddenly we're doing dnd five days a weekly. We're doing dnd five days a week as I don't know, we might need this too much, but, like I mean, for example, syndicult here is a original modern right and playing game. So excited for Syndicolt? Honestly, probably that they gain the sounds most exciting to me. Yeah, but three sentences and I I don't know how you guys are building so much excitement off of just it's real lines. Yeah, Ye, do you not want to hear about the mob families of Xandria? Right, I want to hear about the mob families of Xandrea. But here's the thing, right, like this is, this is this is kind of where I do have to add a little Cape Capiat Kaby cady. Yeah, this is exciting because we know of EXANDRIA. I brought it up as a point just because not a lot of people would know what Alexandria is. Right, and I guess it's like with any board game. You don't really care about what you're playing in. Right. But I feel like this kind of runs a double edged sword, because as soon as people are like, Oh, this is from critical role like others, is a DD thing. Right. I hope that that's not the case. I know that our friends really enjoyed board games, but I've definitely seen that before where it's like, Oh, you're deriving this off of some other art. I don't like the original one, so I probably won't like this. I hope that that's not the case with this, because with the with with such a large community, you also have lots of people going, well, I don't really enjoy DD right, and they get very cemented in that mentality. I don't know how accurate that might be with our group. I just something that I thought of, like something like I can definitely picture somebody going like, Oh, this is like a dd like this is a critical role, like Ding, yeah, yeah, Oh, okay, like, I might not be interested, right, you know, but you know, that's why you just tell them it's called syndicult and really like that's all they mean to know. That's a thing, right, like largely critical role is going to sell to critters. Critters are predominant to be the ones that are going to be purchasing this off of the local game stores. I love that they're they're they're focusing and they're telling their they're encouraging you to buy local as well, which is something that you don't see very often. Right, a lot of a lot of these startup ventures, whether it be with Merch or whether it be any other items that they're creating. They usually want everyybody to buy from their Web store...

...and buy directly from US, right. So I really like that they're pushing out to to liven up and strengthen the closeness between players and their local game stores. I think that that's a really positive, really positive mindset that the guys over at critical role have, and I mean you can hear Matt talk about this all the time, which is like how his upbringing into this world was largely deal dealt with, you know, his local game store, his local community of nerds that banded together to play the D right. So it's it's really wonderful that they're encouraging that and also releasing more and more of their creativeness to the world. But I'm sure that we'll have lots to talk about. With regards to the DARRINGTON press, we're gonna, I imagine that you Couldta is definitely going to be a purchased game for our group. So we'll definitely get back once this is released in q one with giving them rob us of the game once it's out and given that they have a couple more games, will will likely have a lot more both talk about the right to the Dayton press and in the coming weeks. Actually, I'm pretty excited. We're getting closer and closer to the release of Tasha's cauldron of everything. So I've started to see that they're releasing a couple of inside the book, behind the scenes kinds of videos like they'd have done with a past releases. So I'm excited to dive into that in the coming days, but for now I think that Jordan. Yeah, please set that time. All right, it is the time, guys. We're going into the Dungeon Masters Guide. We are on page seventy two. We're talking about chapter three, free which is about creating adventures. Specifically, we're going to go through published adventures and the adventure structure today, or at least some of it, because this is a large section and it's going to be fantastic storytelling. I think is some of my well, my favorite part of DD in general, so it's a really interesting part for me here. So let's go ahead and get started with divining the DMG, guys. Page seventy two published adventures. Published Adventures are available for purchase. Obviously they've got all sorts of adventures out there that you guys can get it. Basically, the section talks about how with these published adventures you don't have to use them. You can always take villains from them, or you can use campaign settings or you can use, you know, story or whatever, whatever suits your needs. That's kind of like what they're trying to talk about here in this published adventures section. It also obviously is a way with published adventures. It's it's easy to just kind of get right into it, especially for newer dms and things like that. So I personally I would suggest, as a new DM, that you start with a published adventure and then and then you can start taking inspiration from that afterwards. I don't know about you guys, is what do you think about that? I agree, but I think that the section here is super important if you are a new DM running a published adventure. MMM, where it says a published adventure can't account for every action the character might yeah, Yep, if I had not now, I found this the hard way, or rather not the hard way, because I'm generally a pretty flexible DM. So when my players say can I do this ridiculous thing that the module doesn't account for, my immediate thought is just running that through. Is that possible? Yes, is it cool? Yes. Is that going to be fun? Yes, all right, sure, go for it. But if you're brand new to DD running this with no context as to how to really like shape your adventure, then you might be sitting there going well, you can you do this? Know, the book says nothing about that. So No, you're limited to like one of five choices that is mentioned here. Yeah, yeah, I mean the published adventures do you can be a little bit rail roady. I think some of them are definitely more so. I know a few of them are pretty open and they can. They can work well with the more flexible DM's, but again, I guess it depends on the group that you're working with too. Write. Yes, what do you think, Carlos? I mean for the most part with the published adventures it's a lot easier as a DM to...

...prep for them the because you don't have to balance the creation side of yea. So I think, yeah, they can be a little bit Railroady, mainly because you want the story to progress forward and, for example, in to move annihilation, where, let's say you guys don't get a guide right, there's really no direction for me as a DM to say, Oh, obviously this is the path through the jungle, right, characters that have never been here. This is how you track the lost city of Omu, who is like who in the book is constantly referenced as You know, ancient not that many people know it exists, for that lost city. It's lost. It's yeah by, you know, this golden trail of dust that's going to be always visible to the players. So I think as a DM, it's really important to you know at least the way I chose to run it, which was to always have some sort of NPC character in each zone that I kind of defined on the map, right, and they would kind of guide you to the next zone. Now, are those MPC characters in the published content or did you make that up? These characters are in the book. I didn't have okay characters. I just as a DM, I chose to expand a little bit on what their function was in the campaign. Now that's only because, like, I take a lot of inspiration from video games when I try to run my games, just because it's the easiest thing I can reference. It. Lets me make the most decisions, let's me make decisions quickly and the table. If I can just easily reference it to some sort of game mechanic that I've experienced before. So I figured that. Yeah, like in a lot of video games you have, like I was thinking, like in kingdom hearts, right, like how you have the ai that's kind of always with you and you can kind of go to them for like a tip on where to go next, right, like a nabby per se for your characters, right, and this made sense to get you guys from location to location, but the same time the finesse is finding how to like get you guys to choose, you know, to go that way, got home because they're like one of the one of the clear things that was written in the book is that the locations don't have to be where they are on the map. Right, like you, as a DM, can choose where your players are, like if you're going east, like, well, maybe you're going to a shrine, maybe you hit a swamp, but, like it depends on what the DM is feeling at the time, which makes it a little bit easier, but maybe not. A lot of adventures have that mobility, right, like if you have if you're playing a campaign on the swords coast, right, like okay, well, the cities are on the map. The cities aren't going to magically move right. So that might actually change how your players need to interact with the game. So I think, like in in Oh move, for example, it was it's too broad almost right, like it's too broadness, since that if you're playing with new players, while they don't they have, they have an overload on how many options they might have. Right, if you're running, but you if you run a too railroady right, well then it's it's a little hard to justify, like hey, okay, well, we're in this jungle. Why do we always have to stay by the river, like you know, why don't? Why do we always have to follow this one path? So, at least in that particular module, they were very clear, but letting you know that locations should change. I chose not to do that. I chose to just have this like expedited travel time, right, which is you're choosing to go somewhere and you're going to make it to the next location. That your plate, that your characters are aware of going right, like you hear of names, you're going to find your way there. Now, is that you know? Does that really increase the threat of getting lost in the jungle now, but that's not really something that I wanted. You has right, so I chose to kind of omit that. But again, going back to like the modules themselves, I think it's it's important that they do tell you that, like yeah, like, your players aren't going to follow you know, exactly the same thing, right, like even if you're running like the starter set right, like yeah, first thing is you go into the Goblin cave. Well, okay, well, we can skip that completely. We can go to fanil it, but okay, that's actually written in the book. That's that's that's that's a counter for so yours at DM. Go, okay, I just start here, you know, in this section. Like what of use? What if, all of a sudden your players go this doesn't really like I don't really know how to approach this. So let's let's storm the manner...

...right away. What it's like? Okay, well, you guys are all level one right now, like, Oh shit, like you're gonna die. Like. So those things are what you have to develop as a DM. I think, like those are the types of things where you, as a DM, need to play lots of games to understand better. Like I use the flip back to like some sort of game mechanic that I might know to answer those questions, but that's not directly in the book. Right. So that's that's kind of where you might get lost as a player later on. I think the later on. Now I see source books as just source books. I don't really see like if I'm looking at like the the yawning portal, right, like that is a published book with a couple of mini adventures in it, but I see that more of a guide on. Like okay, these are more dungeons I can add on to a campaign or add on to story or this is more thematic and for nation, on a region, right, like, versus like, Oh, this is a full campaign from start to finish, which I mean. Sorry, I like, like, like to the to the artists that are designed and create these start like these stories from start to finish. It's, you know, I guess it's part of the game, right, like it can work and adapt it. Yeah, you know, but it is, it's got, it's expected. It's expected, honestly, for these kind of creator creations, right, but the people are going to make it their own right and that's kind of fun. of DD. So I think in some way, like for me, when I first started dming, the books were very helpful with regards to organizing where things are and we're people, what people might be able to do. I immediately lost that comfort once players started taking choices onto their own hands, right. I had to think of something very quickly to account for that. Yes, but now I just see source books as source books inspiration. prepublished adventures are just sort of source books for me for knowledge of magic items, knowledge of the Mata cultures and whatnot. But yeah, Yep, and that is exactly what they say you should do here. So that's good. What's move on here to the adventure structure. So this is the basic structure for any given adventure. You're going to have a beginning, a middle and an ending. The beginning of adventure is a hook to get players interested. A Good Hook piques the interest of the players and provides a compelling reason for their characters to become involved in the adventure. This, I think, is one of the hardest parts of any adventure, especially at the beginning. I think later on it's a little bit easier to hook people into like new adventures as they've come across a bunch of different information, but when you're first starting off an adventure with a new group of people, it's I've always found it's really hard to find a compelling reason for them to go to different places or do different things. I don't know about you guys. Do you guys have that problem too, or am I just crazy? I know that that's something. If, if readers and hope or listeners. If readers, if you're reading this podcast, if our listeners have read our written content, one thing that we like to do is include at least three hooks into our into our prepublished adventures, because, especially looking at the fact that I started off my homebrew campaign as a fun little adventure and were now like, you know, drugs and assassins. Not Everybody has the same placed out and not one hook is going to hook every single group. Yeah, so I think it's important to have if you're writing an adventure, I think it's important to have a couple of different hopes, I tend and to have one that's kind of altruistic, one that's more loot focused and one that's kind of somewhere gray in the middle. Interesting. I like that. What about you, Carlos? How are you for hooks. Um I think it's gotten easier as we've all gone better players. Initially it was a little bit difficult because it was like a control thing with regards to D M and Wi's, like okay, I have like I prep for this. Right, like my hook for this session might be that you need to like, you know, save the town or whatever. But right, you didn't really take an interest to the town. Shit, like, what the fuck do I do now? Yeah, so, initially I found that it was a little bit difficult to get the plot hooks in right now into annihilation. You guys could walk away, I guess, but yeah, that's it, that's that would be the adventure. Let's say, you guys can't do that. I I was like, all right, well,...

...this is it. I like, yeah, I wouldn't know where to go from there. At that point. I think I would just sort of, you know, expedite to twelve years in the future to see what happens, and you know from there. Yeah, world, yeah, it's because you didn't take that fetch quest hey, I mean sometimes it do be like that. There are consequences in actions. But yeah, I always find that finding compelling reasons for for the start of an adventure is always difficult. So definitely don't feel bad if you feel the same way. It's it's you'll get better at it and the players will start to feel more connected to the story as a whole as you move forward. So it's just getting past that initial like, Oh, okay, we're random people who just met kind of thing. I've always found it's good to have some sort of story for your character in in advance and then have that connected to either a place or another person, preferably another player. That way there's some sort of connection to the world and then you can kind of go from there, at least when I'm building a story. But I'm a very event paced based person, story based person, so that with. I think it'll go over that a little bit later in the book here, but let's move on. The middle of an adventure is where the book of the story unfolds. With each new challenge, the adventures must make important choices that have a clear effect on the conclusion of the adventure. So maybe rumors of treasure were a trick to lure them into some sort of a death trap. Yeah, ran to dustups, goes. Yeah, perhaps the socalled spy and the Queen's Court is actually a scheme can concocted by the monarch or self. You know, you just the middle of the adventure is when Shit hits the fan, like things start to change and new goals are set by the players because of the events that have happened in the story. I always enjoy, I think, the middle part of the adventure because that's when a lot of the story comes out and people start to get really into it, or at least I do. I know some people are a lot more focused on the combat aspect of things that way, so it's not as important to them the middle part as, let's say, the end part where you face off against the big bad but I always enjoy the story aspect of things. So this is this is definitely my favorite part. We talked a little bit last week about subverting expectations as and subverting what your players are expecting, and I think that this is where that would happen in the story. Yes, yeah, it's kind of like we're where the truth comes to light and what they thought was going on isn't really what's going on, and now they've got to readjust the reality according to exactly the bill. The beginning is definitely the part where it's like okay, everything is as it seems, and then the middles like Oh, you were wrong the whole time. Everything is changed, or one part has changed, we were off about one little thing even would just be a great subversion. So you can be like, oh no, this kind of has implications for all this other stuff. HMM. One thing is sorry in general. Sorry, like in general, though, like that comes with like this is where the game kind of separates from you running a game and you also being a storyteller, right, which takes time and you need to develop with experience. Yes, it does mention here that you need to remember that the characters are the heroes of the story. So never let them become mere spectators watching as events unfold around them that they can't influence. I don't think I've ever seen a situation where my characters couldn't influence in some way. I mean obviously, like certain events are going to happen, but how they happen can change and or what the characters do with that event afterwards is also, you know, completely up to them. So yeah, just make sure you're leaving openings, I guess, is what it's trying to say, and not just saying Oh, story, story, story, story, Oh, you guys are still their story, story, story, like you have to let the players also be a part of that story, because they're they're telling it almost as much as the DM them. Slight addendum to that. The players are the protagonist hero. Yeah, I mean,...

...you will get reigns are a thing, very, very great campaign. Everything ro is not a given. Indeed, I don't think spoken from experience or something bread way too much excepted. All right, the ending. This is the ending encompasses the climax, the scene or encounter in which the tension building throughout the entire adventure reaches its peak. A strong climax should have the players on edge, with the fate of their characters and much more hanging in the balance, the outcome of which hinges on the characters actions and decisions. Should never be a foregun conclusion and should never be a for gun push, for sure, and ending doesn't need to tie up everything in an eat boat. Story threads can be left hanging, waiting to be resolved in a later adventure. A little bit of unfinished business is a great way to have like a hook for your next adventure, especially if you're playing in a longer campaign or sure? All right, what do you think, Braden? Do We got time? Can we move on to adventure types? Is it? How long is it venture types? Aha, it depends how much of the well, no, we do. Yeah, there's a lot of wore next segment, but we do. Yeah, yeah, exactly. So I think I will hand this over to you, unless any of you guys have anything more to say about adventures structures in general. None from me, Carlos. Nope, I'm done. All right, then, next time we'RE GOING TO HEAD UP location base adventures. So look forward to that. But for now, Braden, take a wheel. Well on that case, this episode of triple advantage is brought to you by web of terror, a new old buttonw re release from the Royal City Society, taking your level five players on an adventure to find three missing hunters in the woods. What took them? Is it still there? Are you in danger? Yes, you are available now for purchase. Pay What you can on DMS guild, and now we can move on to talk of the town, where we ask you, the our listeners, the society, a question about the game as a whole, and we see what you had to say, the question for this week. Do you prefer playing weapons based classes or spell casters, and why? Jordan, you are going to have that probably half an hour's worth of answer on this one, so let's see that. Your first I got it. Okay. If I have to choose, it's spell casters, but I say that with a heavy heart because I really like the melee range characters as well. So I say spell casters specifically for the utility I enjoy the wizards and the bards and that kind of thing that can do lots of stuff outside of combat and play around with everything out there. or or the wizards, who are very combat oriented, but they use their spells for altering the battlefield as opposed to dealing straight up damage. If I want to deal straight up damage, I'm going to play as a Marshall Class, for sure. My favorite for that, I think, is the monk, because they're awesome. But otherwise, yeah, spell casters for sure. I love warlocks with their invocations. That's always a ton of fun. And Yeah, warlocks and wizards are my top two probably for those guys, it's hard choice, though. Can't believe you'd make me do this. All Right, Carlos, what do you think? I think personally I've had the most fun playing weapon users or just some melee characters. I think that part I got a player. I always like to kind of have this Jackie Chan type of character, which I can only really do with a melee character and the the it's just easier to sort of like ground what I want to do when I kind of have an awareness of my own limitations, you know. Yeah, it's really fun to be a spell castor into and to do that, don't get me wrong, but I just don't have as much fun like thinking of like a Combo when I'm trying to fight somebody, when I'm casting a spell right, and I think that's that's that's for me because of the limitations of spell casting right, like there are. I'd love for us to get into some rules about like mixing magic and spell combos. I think that would be really fun. But at right now, at the game right it's like you can't the action. Yeah, but I'm...

...talking like more like interactions with spells and environment and spell right, you know. Yeah, so for that I think I want to say melee characters. Personally, I enjoyed playing more. I like how you say melee specifically and not range characters, because melee characters are way more fun. I mean like there, I don't I don't know, like with the rains, like okay, fire an air, I miss. Cool, but like, but maybe I'm it was like are go for an Uppercut, are go. Yeah, okay, I go for whatever exactly. You know what's funny? I and I found that that I kind of get a better sense of that when I pre roll my attacks, like I'll still I'll still like do the same amount of attacks, but I'll just pre roll them so I know that, like, oh, that's like my first swing, I hit, I do this kind of cup move right then my second hit I miss and like that was a whatever. I've had a little bit more fun doing that recently, for sure. I'm a hundred percent with you there. So right in. What do about you, though? I'm definitely way more partial to the spell casting. I'm surprised. Yeah, anybody that's seen en of my twentyzero warlock characters. I I don't know. I like the I like the fantasy aspect of things. Like there are lots of TT RPGs where you can play a melee character or like a weapons base character and admittedly, there's lots that you can do with spell casting as well. That's casting. Is something that's like, I can't, you can't do it here in real life and do it here, which is not to say that I'm going to go out and start smashing people with a hammer here either, but but you could that I could if I was so inclient, this is getting to be yeah, no, I can't. I can't cast El Blast Irlm so. So I want to do it in the game, but let's take a look at what our society had to say about this. I A looking first at our instagram page. We had a comment from Dr Matt At. You, Wewelth, we're getting full on doctor's replying to our stuff now. He responded with spell casting. It often feels like it's easier to come up with creative ways to use spells. So almost the opposite of what you were saying, Carlos. He really likes, it sounds like, to slip into that role where he is like thinking up, all right, what crazy combos am I going to do? Exactly like, versus just defaulting back to the melee, but knowing that with the melee it's like, Oh, okay, I know what I'm going to do, and you can kind of come up with the better way of describing things. Usually with that kind of stuff, for sure, I find yeah, looking over at our twitter page at world either, sixty six replied with I prefer martial classes because I'm a big dumb dum who can't keep track of spells out. Thanks Nice, I like. But yeah, I I can relate, not not so much for the big dumb dumb part, but with the spells. Can Be hard to keep tracking. When you get into like wizards, who have like or I'm trying to think of which classes, then pretty much knows everyone is a default and they just got to select. Is that? Cleric, I mean wizards, are able to learn more spells than any other class. It's true. So event like, eventually wizards like and then that the points. Anything else? Say? Yeah, exactly, I know. Cleric's do have a lot of choice and they're able to switch their spells over long rest. That's the big thing for them. A lot of the other like other classes, like Bard, they learn a certain number of spells and then they can only change it when they level up, as opposed to a long rest. So the option variable for cleric's is a lot higher than something like a bird in a in a similar sense, I found the power associated with lots of spells, lots, to be overwhelming. We see like amount of spells known aside. I started playing a sorcerer for the first time and going from warlock disorcer and suddenly having access to all these different spell slots. MMM, I was overwhelms, like this is so yeah. So I jump into combat, I use them all within about four rounds and then I up. That was a lesson in what not to do. That's what can trips are for, unfortunately. But there's also I always find material components is...

...so hard to keep track of. If and like verbal and somatic things, like if you have to keep back of that kind of thing for your game two, that's always a tricky one. It's hard that. I don't it's an extra thought process in there. Yeah, it's very component. Isn't so bad, but the verbal and somatic is so little. Yeah, yeah, the especially the verbal part, like if you're in an area where you can't talk or something like that, and you've got this spell that requires verbal components and you don't know that, you have to keep going and looking. Oh, does this require verbal component? Yes, it does. Okay, I can't use that one. WHAT'S THE NEXT ONE? Oh, YEP, this one doesn't need a verbal I can cast that one, but it's useless. It's, yeah, annoying, but I feel like maybe eventually you start to learn. I don't know, it's hard. What else do we got? The final comment of going to read is from our community discord from User Matt. I'm always partial to a bit of both if I can really enjoy playing a valid bard or a Pellett into this end and always wanted to go a blade singer, warblock a try it's wizard strout as well. Yeah, they're the half caster. wrote a half castor. I know so. So you've designed a couple half casters in your time, Dan. I am not super into the value rough caster. It's like to go one or the other. Yeah, I mean I get that, and it's usually I find because the half castor is generally speaking, don't have as much options. That right, like your utility is decrease, for sure, but you usually trade it out for something like combat prowess. So, for Paladin's they've got the divine smite and honestly, it is ridiculously powerful. If you can get divine smites off like it's insane. It's insane how much damage you can do as a Paladin, as you know. And then you see it, start seeing crits on them and stuff like that as they smite, and it's just like, okay, Yep, that you're like a rogue, except you've got, you know, a lot. You're a lot tank here and you've got healing and you've got, you know, all these other things that make you yeah, the one downside is you've got a code you have to live by. All is your an oath breaker. But exactly then you can go oath breaker. You'll get my players more ideas. But I believe that that is all that we have today for talk of the town. Listeners out there, let us know what you think it. Keep an eye to our social media for the next talk of the town question, for our newest releases and just to stay engaged with us. We'll see you next time.

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