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Triple Advantage
Triple Advantage

Season 3, Episode 27 · 1 year ago

Ep. 51 - TOP TIPS FOR NEW DM'S #CLICKBAIT

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this week's episode of Triple Advantagec we discuss a subreddit on tools for your games, continue following the Dungeon Master's Guide through unique NPC's, and recount some of the strangest things found in the D&D world.

On this week's episode of triple advantage, we discussed a subreddit on tools for your games. Continue following the Dungeon Masters Guy Through unique NPCs and we re count some of the strangest things found in a dnd world. As always, follow us on our social media to see what we have in store for you. Enjoy the show. All right, hello, members of society. Welcome again. On this echoes of the Yatlons, I took some time in peruse one of my favorite subreddits. The find very interesting things so bring up to the guys. I often go on a dnd behind the screen. I think that it's a great subreddit for DM's all like to congregate and chat about their ideas and games and share content. So I found some things that we're actually kind of close to, things that I found interesting in the Games, and specifically this one called my eye because of my character thorn, in your horde of the Dragon Queens Journey of dragons campaign Britain. This is the five e mini fishing game. Essentially it's a bit of a dice challenge and, depending on the roles of you get, it lists how far you can cast a line, how long you have to reel a line and how long you might have to like snag the fish, all done through different and variant combinations of Die Rolling, with modifications based on your characters innate skills. This got me thinking of just pretty interesting, because a the character, thorn, that I have, loves to go fishing on downtime with some local doc workers and water deep and be. Have you guys ever introduced any sort of mini games inside of your games? I think that these are cool and you find these in a lot of RPG games, but essentially things like, let's say, your gambling stalls or, you know, even actual investments and whatnot that you might like want to add into your game. But have you guys ever thought about doing anything like that with your campaigns and, if so, what have that? What have those been? I've done so. I my players in my home grew have visited a very vegas esque placed a couple times and when they did, they were able to visit casinos. And I went online and it was a document that I have. I can't remember I got it from right it but I can't remember who published it. It's is a list of a ridiculous amount of casino games that can be played just by rolling dice, just by using a d six or a couple d sixes or you twenty. So basically I didn't even rep specific tables because, like, this place was so large in scale that I figured in some capacity they would have every game that was available. So I wasn't like you find x, Y and Z, I was like no, here's the list. What do you want to play? So then everybody kind of took turns play in a couple of the Games on there or session. It was a lot of fun. HMM. I won quite a bit of money there. Yes, you did, but have you ever ransom hoover rans me like that Jordan? I haven't run anything, I guess, yet, but I definitely do have plans to implement that kind of thing, especially for like so wild mount has like calendars with different like festivals and stuff like that. So if the players ever come across the town during a festival time of year, I will for sure have, like I have a list of different like festival events that I have prepared already for when they do end up there. Just for fun. I think it's a good way for the players to get more invested in the campaign itself and just to be like, Oh yeah, this is something that we can actually do in the world that's not just straight up like let's go and kill this monster kind of thing. You know, it makes them feel at it makes the world feel a little bit more well rounded, I think. So, yeah, it adds is little extra elements of fun and I think it's one of those things where, like, when you think about DD and you're hoping that you're getting this immersive campaign, it's one of the things that actually add on to you know, like extra mini games, right, and extra rules that your players can distract themselves with in the world, and I think that that's pretty interesting. I think this I've seen different variations of that. The fishing game just caught my attention just due to thorn and campaign, so I'm going to be setting this over to you, by the way. Written. But yeah,...

I like I've seen those, like world of warcraft has some of those, and I think it's always interesting to add these kinds of many games to dnd campaigns as well, because you want to use the dies right, like you don't want to be adding extra tools and one that might be required by players. So I think is pretty fun. It doesn't look I think the balance of them is that, like, for something like a gambling game, you can make the odds even for everybody, but some for something like a fishing game, you might want to like, you know, if you player with a Fisher, how do you tune these things to make it more accessible to those players that are already skilled in these kinds of things? But yeah, just something that I found that it's interesting and it's sparked an interesting just interesting ideas on my head. I want to get you guys as thought on that. The other cool thing that I found is somewhat of an an item compendium. I'll I send you guys the links, so you guys, if you guys, can open it up. Someone user made the lute shop and we'll be posting these on our twitter after so everybody could find these tools and little read a post essentially. But the lute shop essentially creates a or random loot table or rolls for on a land random lute table and it populates items on your web page for you to use. So if your players ever visit new stores or whatever, you could just clickly, like you can just click new item and it'll reroll you some new interesting item that this shop keep might have in their store. I really like items like this because it does give it that world, a little bit of that depth that you're looking for right and like no, no, no shopkeeper is going to have the same set of stores and or so the same set of items are their stores. But it also raised another question, which is how unique do you guys make your source in your campaigns? Because we think about games like Pokemon, for example, every mark almost has the same kind of things, changes by region slightly. But in DND, are you expected to have magical, wondrous shops that have new and unique items every or do you have so much generic shops? Finding on your game world? What do you guys prefer? Definitely depends on the game. I can't remember why I was reading this recently, but I was recently reading about the commonality of magical items and people talking online about how you shouldn't really have magic shops in traditional dd rules is written because magic items are supposed to be rare and super hard to come across. And even potions. I remember reading like, you know, if you can find like a potion of healing, like it's probably not just going to be a matter of paying for you're probably going to have to do something else on top, because that's how valuable they are. And I'm thinking about that and I've never played in a campaign like that. I've always been able to buy potions in most places have some kind of magic shop, and that's that's how I like to run it too, because, like, magic items are the coolest and I want my players to like see them and not necessarily to have them all right away, because that might be a little game breaking. But if they can, if they can see them in aspire towards them and eventually save up and buy them, then I think that can be a little cooler than like eighteen sessions in they're digging one out of the EUBBLE and they're just like, I have no idea what this is, but yeah, I I tend to prep though, for shopping sessions. So I don't I don't know that a lute table would be the best. I wouldn't put it to the best use. I'm sure other people would love that, but I I like to prep my shops in advance with their own unique items. I would probably use it, honestly, be because if I don't know it just it depends on how far the players get in a in a in the session, I guess, if they can make it to another town then and then they decide that they're just going to go shopping. Maybe I just haven't prepped the shop yet for that because it's not one of the first things that I generally speaking do. So for me to just throw in a couple of unique things on top of the normal general stuff, I think is a perfect way to do that because it adds a little bit of labor and it doesn't require too much extra thought. Obviously, if, if I'm if it's like a larger town or like it's a real magic shop, then I'd throw in like then I'd have to prep that kind of thing. But for just random shops and things like that, maybe maybe some of them, like a general store, does have a couple magical items. I can think of. Like my players are currently in Serin Lea, which is isisle cross in wild mount and it's known for collecting artifacts...

...and things like that throughout like it's in brand new like adventuring market essentially, where they go and they collect random artifacts from the AORIAN disaster, I guess, crash site. So it would make sense for them to have random little trinkets and things like that that that people come back with and don't necessarily use or maybe they just, you know, sell it off kind of thing. So for that kind of place, like yeah, if they had like a general store, then yeah, I could throw in like a couple magical items that have been picked up randomly along the along, along the road or whatever. So it makes a lot of sense that way. But yeah, like for the bigger towns, I'd have like a specific magic shop that has his items. Back to your point, they're braiden about like rules as written. It like magic shops don't exist in d indeed, that's an interesting thing. I'd never even really considered that. It would have to be a very low magic setting, I think, because spell scrolls and potions are things that can be created with fair ease, assuming, you know, there are wizards. They can they can write down, you know, those kind of scrolls pretty much whenever they want, as long as they have the money for it. And if they set up a shop they can have in income and then just create, keep creating more spells and scrolls and things like that. So it makes sense that spell scirls at least would be available, and same with the potions, you know, pothecaries and stuff like that. So it doesn't really make sense to me to not have magic shops. But maybe for like, you know, really enchanted items and things like that, like weapons, maybe it makes more sense for people to find it. But I've always thought that that's kind of a weird thing too. It's like, okay, so you went to this random dungeon and there happens to be a ridiculously powerful item that was left behind there. When was this created? How is it created, and did people just lose the ability to create these kind of items, and if so, why? Interesting story plots in general, though, I think that you're right, though it's definitely setting dependent the amount of magical items that you might have available to your world. I would definitely change between something like Veron and the swords goes and the flavor of magical items to write. Like you never on, you'd have more like mechanized artifies or kind of items, and I would imagine that leaves and so it's coase you're going to have your final raw vanilla magic items. One thing about the shops, though, that's interesting to me is that I've actually like in the tub of an Ilation campaign that I've had a very limited exposure to running shops, and that's just by the nature of the location. And one of the things that I found that I like about shops is that they provide you with the items information most of the time, right, unless it's like some guy that just found a random thing that they're now selling, most shop owners will know what these magical items do. Let me tell you what a party that doesn't have identify. I've been like trying to give you guys items without the Schewness of this is definitely a curse item in dd but it's kind of hard to do that as well when you guys can't identify any of these items and are lost in this jungle and you kind of have to Yolo everything. Right. It's it definitely gives a different feel to using magical items, I think, and I especially because you know the area is, you know, cursed and dangerous and set are etcter se are. You're going to have a predisposition to think that every single item is going to be seventy five percent chance that it's very bad, right. Yeah, and that's just by the nature of it, right, and I can't avoid it because I don't have many shops to be like, oh, this is how you use this long lost magical item that no one's ever found because it's been in the fucking jungle for decades. But because of that, I really do, I really do like these tools in particular just because I love being you. Utilizing your compute power to make your dming easier, as always, something that I that I'm all for. It's an easy way to I see it as a great way for DMS to quickly, you know, if you're good enough, with like the improvisational aspect of the game right like that. Just prompting you with a full like picture of an item and a small little description of what it could be is enough for some people to actually riff off and create a little twist to their story. So I love tools like this and I personally like to uuse tables as much as possible or...

...use table mechanics as much as possible. I know the last campaign that I ran I had a little bit of a mishap because I was like rolling dice and searching for the spells you could find in the magical spells girls at the same time. But sometimes the stream reveals information behind the screens it like that. That's the kind of stuff that, for me, I wouldn't want to prep beforehand, right because it would seem kind of weird to me that, like, Oh, I know my players are going to pick for random or like up to four random scrolls from this room. Therefore I'm going to have exactly what they're going to be drawing. That seems a little bit too locked to me, especially given the nature of the event and one. So I love tables and I like to use tables as much as possible. But what's your guys as disposition towards tables? If item tables, for example for shops, are not what you would use Bratin, do you use them for encounters? Do you like random tables a sort of idea, you know, because you could go, you could build a shop, you could build an actual encounter builder, you know. Would you use something like that or do you more like to prep your campaigns fully, iron them? I like to prep my campaigns fully. I've used tables. I find that tables to me are almost like a limit on what I can do. Like, as soon as they start bringing in tables, it feels like I'm restricted to whatever's on those tables. So I like to bull plan wherever I can. I've used tables before, mostly in one shot scenarios where I'm not and the parties not overly invested necessarily in what they get, because I've tried to if I've my homebrew party just killed a dragon recently and so they got like, obviously a ton of golden stuff in a ton of currency that they would you expect to find it a dragon hoard. And then they also got, like one of our rogues got like a cool tool for thievery, because that's what she likes to do. Are Goliath just got a big magical great acts from his tribe because that was thematic to where we were. Our warlock just got a very specific spell scroll that he's been looking for because it asked me up front, like can I get my hands on this at some point? Yes, so I included that in there. So that's a situation where like I feel like they were actually invested in the lute and the lout, like it was something meaningful and like they'll each there's not each of them that's a big party, but like at least three of them walked away with something like very nice that they'll actually enjoy using versus, like maybe they will, maybe they won't. Versus, I found like a one shot. If you do a one shot there's a good ense that you might not ever use those characters again and that the items in gold or inconsequential. We've done a couple of things in our home groups collaboratively to kind of eliminate that with the carrying over a loot from character character in one shots. But on the whole I think that in a Oneshot, if you're going to use a table, that's the place is. Then you can just roll and it's like, Oh, this is what you find. It's like, oh, cool, and then if it's if they use it, they use it. If they don't, then there's like a fifty chance I'll never see that character again anyways. So right, yeah, for me, I I'm mostly on the same lines as braid in there. I like prepping things specifically because I find that most of the time I like to have thematic I like to have the themes kind of match whatever it is that I'm trying to push for in the campaign or whatever it is that the players seem to really enjoy. Kind of thing. An fior to use a table I would essentially make the table out of the things that I want to see or the players want to see, you know, a combination of that. I'd make my own table, using only items that I think are cool, instead of using a randomized table that I get from somewhere else. If I am using a randomized table, it would be for something like an encounter, if if they're traveling to the particularly, I'm not the kind of encounter that you think of, that you're thinking not like a not monsters or anything like that. I wouldn't do that. I don't think I would do it for something like, okay, so they're coming across this, you know, this ice bridge or something like that, and you know, maybe there's one of four different, you know, particular particularly difficult sections of this bridge that to make it across, and I would like rolled on a table to see like, okay, which parts are, you know, where's the difficulty in this part? You know, is it? Is this the problem with the bridge? Is this the problem with the bridge, or is that? You know,...

...it would be the same for like, you know, if if you've if you're in a ship and you hit a rock along the way, maybe I'd roll a table to see on a table to see how much damage it really did or, you know, what parts of the boat needs to be fixed up kind of thing or something along those lines. I wouldn't use it, yeah, for really anything too important, I guess, mostly just for randomizing effects, I guess, more so than encounters against it's a better way to put it. So your you'd more like them for flavor elements then, yeah, actual story and or sure, game play on months. Yeah, yeah, so, like I wouldn't roll it on a table to see whether they get hit a rock kind of thing. I'd roll on a table to see what that rock does to the ship, because it's just flavor at that point. Right, okay, yeah, I mean my stance on the on the tables is largely the same. I love tables and I think that we this conversation led me into some some other areas here and I really want to explores how you guys like to think of items in general and like manage the I mean it's different as we run individual player camp. anyways, this might be a topic for another week, but the last last interesting thing that I found was essentially a guy. Oh God, word at the page. Go hold on. The tips yes, it was. It was six tips on teaching new DD players and I just want to give you us thoughts on what you guys think, because as we move on to a more open, community based game, this something that we're gonna have to consider more and more. So. Tip Number One, host a session. Zero, I think agree. Five are we can all agree that this is a pretty hot tip and valuable interactions always come from this. Yep, it's number. To run a mock fight. Sessions normally have at least one fight and some kinds. It's important for players to know how to fight their characters. So before a session and even with the other players, you run a moth fight, focusing on initiative, movement and rolling to hit. It's interesting. I like that. I mean you could easily do that like in game two, but it like it depends on whether you're running with experience players and new players at the same time. I guess like if everyone's new, it doesn't really matter. Yeah, then you can just run it with the campaign. Just make sure it's a easy enough encounter, right. Yeah, like you can still have it in the campaign, but, like running a mock fight, if it only takes like fifteen, twenty minutes. Sure, like you could just set up a super easy and counter that's like hey, do this, then you can do this and then do this kind of thing. Yeah, and just have them run over the super basics. But like, as soon as they get into a real fight, you know, rolling to hit is not the only thing that's going to come into play. You've got spell SAFETYC's, you've got you know, like actual spell choosing kind of thing, you've got actions like dashing and dodging and well, yeah, I mean the game is going to have all of the actions and available mechanics of the game always like yeah, but in general, I think how would you run then, a very introductory session to make it like one of the things that I think that we can all agree with is that the encounters and combat AC counters take the longest time. Yes, and by a nature that's because players aren't necessarily prepared and players don't sometimes know what it is they're doing. I was like a character choice, but also they don't know what they can do. I think this is justing like the first part that when players are brand new to the game and you don't know the general things that you have available to you, for in combat, what would you introduce and and something like that. So what would your would your key points beat right, because you can't be teaching everybody every single mechanic. Yeah, so I had a player in in my campaign who started the game off basically with zero knowledge. He he gave me. He was like, I'm going to be an amnesiac character that, you know, doesn't really know what he's doing, and so I was like, okay, we will play around with that. So he came in with, you know, like zero knowledge about how the game mechanics work and all that kind of stuff. I gave him a character sheet and then basically what I had him...

...do was I said, okay, describe to me what it is you want to do right now, and he's like, okay, I want to run up and then I want to like bash this person and then make an attack here and then like do this and that and this, and I was like okay, so that might take multiple turns or whatever, but yes, you run up and you can make this bash followed by this attack. I would need you to roll a dtwenty here and add that bonus that I've written down there on the on the paper that that's right beside the attack thing and he's like, okay, I can do that, and so you just have them describe the scene and then you throw in the mechanics that makes sense for the actions that they're trying to accomplish. Yeah, I really got a purge by live. Yeah, I think so. It's I came across. I was reading about certain DM's like to get more descriptive actions out of their players, and that was one of the main things that they talked about, which was more of like a goal setting approach, which is like what is your goal in particular situation? What are you trying to accomplish, and let's build the mechanics around them. Exactly what you just said. So I totally agree with that for sure. I do agree with the writer in general, though I do think that running and mock combat AC counter can come in really handy and it definitely, I think it goes hand in hand with their third point here, which is have their sheets handy. Yeah, so have your players you, as a DM, hold your players character sheets or use I'm pretty sure that we all constantly have access to each other's character sheets when we play. Um, yeah, baby, you have all of ours, or it I have? Oh, no, God, no, no, you don't have all our courages. No, I have yours, I have yours and I have met. Oh, I mean, I don't want my players character sheets either. I I mean for the one guy, I created his sheet, so I knew the numbers and I'm fairly good at memorizing that kind of stuff. Numbers come easy to me, so that was that's not an issue generally speaking for me. So when I created, I mean I literally created the character sheet for one and I helped create two of the other ones, and the others that are in my campaign were like veterans that knew what they were doing. So I just assume that they know what they're doing. So, yeah, the numbers come fairly easy to me, so I just memorize them. Well, I use pretty much dandy beyond to keep truck over character sheets, except for one player who refuses to use the YEP, I'm to make it a requirement for my campaigns going forward. I make it so much easier on my o to be able to just track changes and you guys items. I can literally move shit around behind the scenes. It's perfect. I personally enjoy it quite a lot. Again, I'm a sucker for online tools that make my dming easier. Place to number four place NPCs to allow for ease of role play. I totally agree with this tip, because I think most players aren't comfortable with the role play aspect of the game for the most part. That's one of the more difficult things we're able to get used to. And Yeah, I think this is a great way for you to have a way to interact your players in game instead of trying to let them all figure it out. A special if you have a brand new party of six people have never played this game before, but another one, which is a but in addition to this, I will like to add that creating characters that have bonds with one another will also help reduce this arp anxiety as well. What are your guy stops? I like the creating bonds with each other. I think that's a better way to increase the role play than creating mpcs. NPCs can work. Maybe it's just because I was blessed with character with players that are really into the role play aspect, so it was easy to get them together and to get into that whole play style of it. So it's great that way, but it they also had bonds between them already going into it, because I kind of, you know, pushed for that. I was like, Hey, create a character, try and create like a bond with, you know, one other person or whatever. Maybe we can make some exciting backgrounds together kind of thing, because that's always fun. Having a solo character is is good sometimes, but I've I do find that the the duo back stories are usually better and creates a better enviroronment for role play. So...

...yeah, I would say that it's a it's a complete play style thing. I don't love that. I mean I don't dislike that. I think it's cool when characters come up with a unique backstory, but it's not it's not a requirement for me by any means. No, yeah, I think I think there should be freedom to just kind of craft however you want. For sure. I just pushed for the duel because it's fun, and I mean, like I say, pushed. I was like, Hey, this is a good idea. If you create this, you don't have to, but you can, and I think it's usually fun. And then players go oh, oh, that's a thing I can do. Yeah, okay, usually they'll get on board with it. But what about the MPC's for easing a role play, though I know bring you like to introduce a lot of NPC's in your campaigns. Everybody that we talked is pretty unique. Yeah, in your world's it's fun. I think it's one to interruct with the different characters and I but I think that's also like part on the DM to write like, if you like, to also make voices RP and nothing going to introduce many more characters that you can sort of slip into the cloak of a different, you know whatever, persona. That's what I like about mccason game, at least it. It's like one of the one of my favorite things about dnd is the fact that it gives me an excuse to create random characters I can just play as like almost throughout the entirety of the campaign. Number Five, be excited when your players succeed. Yeah, I think it's one of those your I wouldn't say it's the most fun dming when you're like trying to actively kill your players. I think that's the wrong goal for DMS and I think if that's your goal, you're probably not going to be happy when your players role natural s and that's going to show and that's probably going to deter people from wanting to succeed in the game itself. So heart agree on this one as well. Thodds guys. I mean yeah, just do it. Be excited. Which one of you you're on? You're on the same team, even though you're being the antagonist, I guess, like, yeah, you're acting as the antagonist to the characters, but really you're still on their journey, their team. So you want to create a good environment for that, for your players in and it's for fun. So just do it. Be excited. Yeah, and point number six is have patience, and definitely I will agree. When you're teaching anybody anything new, you got to have patience with them. You can't just expect people to just get things right off on the first on the first got. You can't expect everyb be a combat expert. Can't expect everybody to be ready, but for the love of God, if you have been playing this game for a year or so, you could be more ready to play. And, FTF, I have gotten frustrated with butterers who play that don't pay attention at this point. It's a double edged sword. Yeah, be patients, but be sure to know when you're being too patient. Yes, because, yeah, I gotta move the story forward. I'm fifty sessions into a campaign and I still like we just figured out last week that one of my players didn't know how to adjust their armor class. So they've been sitting at like eleven armor class or something like that since the start and they're like level nine as a rogue. Yeah, HMM, I mean those are things I could go under the radar, especially since it's like new characters for everybody right, like these are things that you might just have forgotten. But like I'm talking about more in general is like have patience, is in like if you're actively telling your players, like guys, come on, like I want like turns, kind of ready to go as they come to you, like that's just part of like the active playing of the game. Right. Those are things that I think can get frustrating for DM's and that's the hardest to have patient since, in my opinion, new players oftentimes just will not have actions in the game. They will sort of refrain from taking serious action due to just choice paralysis. Yeah, so just be ready. It's players, please get your turns right now. I mean I think I says DM's we also have to remember what it was like to be new players in this thing. I remember having the hardest time grasping the difference between warlocks and regular spell casters and how spell slots worked. Just like I don't know what it was. I couldn't wrap my head around it at first, and now I think back and I'm like, why couldn't I wrap my head around this? is so easy kind of thing, right, but...

...it's it's something that I try to keep in the back of my mind when I'm sitting with new players. It's, you know, it's something new to them. They don't. They don't have years of experience with all this stuff. The mechanics especially, are are so difficult to have down pat unless you do the action over and over and over again. Right. So, yeah, now my players understand. Okay, they made a tax enough times. They understand how it works. You know. They know how to roll the die and add the modifier and then add a different modifier for damage as well, and that's a weird part to get used to as well. You know, why does my proficiency bonus get added into my attack role but not to my damage role? How does that work? Kind of thing, you know, so it's it's it's that. That's a that's a bit of a hurdle. Always it's the proficiency bonus. When does that get applied and when does it not? So, but it's it's good to remember that. You know, we were once that way as well, despite our faulty memories. I think of May because, like I remember, I like I got into this game and I pretty much started dming right away. So, like my experience, I think, is a little bit different in regards, like I've always approached this from a very rules based perspective. Like, I don't know, like, at least personally speaking, I feel like it if it feels a little different when you start the scam just as a DM versus as like a player as well. Right, I know, I think. I think at the beginning to we definitely played with the rules a little bit, like we didn't we didn't play it correctly, I don't think, at least as there were certain things. Think there is no correct or encourage one of it. Well, no, I mean a lot of it was, you know, the same as how the rules have it, but I think like we had issues with certain mechanics or something. I can't remember exactly. What it was. I think it's when it up going, oh, that's what it means, and then like I'm changing it up later, which is totally fine. We were new. That's that's the thing, right, like we were new. We had to have patience with ourselves, right, there was a level of comfort at the table, though it sound like it's like we were running this with like random people, and I think that this is this might be something that the article doesn't need to address right, because I think the assumption here is that you're dealing with new players, new random individuals, whereas we started already with some camaraderie in our group because we were already friends. So there's a different level of how much patience I need to have with you guys, versus randoms. Yes, that's true. I guess I haven't really played with random people. Well, I've been to one session where I played with random people, but that was it. Anyway, it was interesting, it's been fun topics and there's something I want to really explore next week in our conversation about the items. I started thinking about this and it's just another we're looking to essentially expand on. I'll tease it out so you guys in proper. But now that we're looking to expend into maybe community games and whatnot, how do we manage the global GDP of this realm and the money? Oh my God, not shift down later out? Yeah, if Wall Sterup bets taught me anything this last couple of weeks is it doesn't really matter. Next up, all right, all right, so, yeah, all right, let's let's get away from all the numbers talk here, guys, and let's move into the DMG. We're working on NPC creation, guys. Last time I went over a bunch of the different traits that you can include in your NPC's and we are now on page ninety one, just starting off with the monsters as NPCs, and then we will move on here and get into some statistics. Apparently we are getting into numbers. WHO, whoops. All right, let's go for it, though. So monsters as NPCs, named monsters that play a significant role in adventure, deserves some attention. You would give the same attention that you would give to a humanoid MPC with mannerisms as well as ideals, bonds, flaws and secrets. So it talks about how you could have a beholder, mastermind that runs criminal activities and stuff like that, and you don't want to use just the stuff that's in the monsters manual. So they give the example of considers ANA far, a beholder that runs an extensive criminal operation in water deep. So it talks about out the different like things that they given him, like the late stocks that are jointed like the legs of insects and stuff like that, and then magic rings that are all...

...over on each of the stocks. So and then it talks about how his ideal is greed and he craves powerful magic items and surrounds himself with a gold and platinum and precious gems. So his bond is to his layer and his flaw is his weakness for exotic pleasures. Finally, prepared food and scented oils and rare spices and herbs. So that Thar's was a bit of a Bougi Gut. Huh. Yeah, so it's they talk about how it's important to establish this kind of information because your characters can interact with this monster in in different ways than just I walk into the layer and I attack him kind of thing. They want the players to have the option to use that greed to their advantage. To trick him into things or to make deals with him, bargains, you know, you gotta. It's to give the players options more than just walking in and slaying the beast kind of thing, which which is a good idea. But again, this is for like important monsters for the most part. Unless your entire campaign is like this. I think it would be pretty difficult to pull off, though, and yeah, it might. It might deter a lot of combat. If every MPC had a fully fleshed out background. Would be interesting. Okay, so then it goes into MPC statistics. But actually, going back to that, do you guys have a lot of monsters with like ideals, bonds and flaws? The the the DGER Master's guide here focuses a lot on the ideals, the bonds and the flaws, because that's how I think they see you getting a one up on them the but they would also have useful knowledge and, like I have talents and that kind of thing. So I don't know, I would find those more important usually. But yeah, I use I use ideals, bonds and flaws for a monster MPC to the same capacity that I use them for my PC, which is not at all. Yeah, but I don't. I don't think that that's like I agree with the sentiment that, yeah, if you have like a significant monster, epee, if you're doing a dragon, if you're doing a be holder, if you're doing a vampire, you should have more interactability than the average know that you're going to encounter and you should give some thought into that. I've never, I've never said, I think I said this for the General NPC's as well. I've never subscribed to the fact that, like, you have to fill out every single one of these boxes every time you want to do these. I think if you have a general sense of all of them wrapped up in an actual character, beyond just like here's three bullet and talking points about what this character is, I think that's I think that's fine. I don't think you need to do this exactly so out of curiosity here, my are, my party, the party I'm in in your homebrew campaign, just recently defeated a dragon. was there a way that that interaction went down without combat, or was it always planned as a combat? I had planned for combat because I know you guys. There's no way that at least one third of that party was letting that turn into an RP and counter. They would have shot first, ask questions later. That's just how that goes be. But yeah, yeah, absolutely there was a way. Okay, I couldn't think of it in the moment. I was like, okay, we tried sneaking in and trying to take the necklace first, and then I thought about maybe trying to persuade this dragon. But honestly, what do you offer a dragon? Really? It's a good quasure. But all right, just just a curiosity. NPC statistics, guys. Okay, so when you give an NPC game statistics, you have three main options. You have giving the NPC only a few statistics that it needs. You have giving them the NPC of Monster Stat block or giving the NPC a class and levels. So the latter two options obviously require a bit more explanation the first one. If you're just doing statistics, they're just like yeah, throw on whatever statistics you think they need, such as insight or persuasion or deception or whatever it is that is their main skill, and then just have a random stat for that, depending on how good you think they are at it.

So using a monster STAP block, so appendix B of the monsters manual contains statistics for many generic NPCs that you can customize as you see fit, and chapter nine of this book offers guidelines on adjusting their statistics and creating new stat box. So they've got things like bandits and bandit captains and they've got cultists and Majes and and beasts of generic types. Lots of good stuff there in the monsters manual. You know the bringing was talking about earlier, just kind of I was just smulling that over and you mentioned that it's like if you're fighting a vampire, if you're fighting a dragon or whatever, right, like make the those encounters a little bit more serious. Yeah, but I that also depends on what kind of game you're running, right, because there's been plenty of video games that I've been playing where the first time you fight one of these enemies, right like the first time you fight one of the dark knots and is all though you're fighting them one at a time, but once you learn the mechanics on how you kill these monsters, they throw like four of them at you and then they're not really an important like enemy anymore. It's like, once your players know that radiant damage will just absolutely mole over vampires. You know, do they need to be important in PC's anymore? There's obviously is a like start, like I's, obviously like story base and what. Yeah, you're just saying creat it. You're treating importances as a mechanical thing. Importance is, yeah, very much in our P thing as well. A dragon would definitely has intelligence far and above that of your average mountain roll. So you're probably going to get additional options and additional opportunities to flex that intelligence in a session and you should be prepared for that. You should be prepared for your PC's to actually engage with that versus something that they might just rhyme both through. Listen, I get what you're saying, but also this is times back to conversation about a couple weeks ago. But anyways, there. You can move on to up the next topic. Turn. Okay. So, using class and levels, so you can create an NBC as just as you would a player character. So, using the rules in the players handbook, you can even use a character sheet to keep track of the NPC's vital information. So I'm not sure if you, if you guys, have ever created mpcs, like full character mpcs. Now have you guys know of played alongside them when the DM has created them? That I've never made one myself. Play NBC's with a big STAP block on them, like a chunky little almost the player kind of thing. I think player characters are really strong, though, so really avoid using player character classes for your mpcs if you yeah, HMM, it is interesting here in so the next thing they talked about is the different class options, which is in addition to the class options in the players handbook. There are two additional handbook class options, sorry, available for evil player characters and NPC's, the death domain for clerics and the oath breaker for Paladin's. Both options are detailed at the end of this chapter. So I've never used the death domain or the oath breaker. I always kind of forget about them until I you know, I know, actually I just I just forget about them, like because they're not they don't even show up in a lot of the like online player character creation, like help, I guess, the death domain and the oath breaker. At least I haven't seen it, or maybe I haven't really been looking for it. Maybe that's maybe that's a possibility, but I've always kind of wanted to try out one of them. So I don't know. Have you guys? You guys, you haven't used them. I assume either haven't used them. Oh, oath breakers pretty significant, though I tend to forget about death tomain cleric if I'm not actively looking at Clarence, which is not often. But oath breakers pretty significant, I think. I think, if I were do you, I think if I were to do that, I would be inclined to introduce him as like kind of like your rival and a campaign of sorts, just due to the the way the power levels get to match up between the characters. Obviously it's different with regards to like, like a party versus a singular character, right, but if you're thinking about like, Oh, you want to introduce an assassin into your campaign, while an assassinate with sixty six of bonus of bonus damage, is really gonna make this character resonate with your players if you're straight taking the sneak attack from rogues, right. So...

...you could definitely make some really strong antagonists with this method, but I'd be sort of shy to use it for every NPC all. So I wouldn't want to do that for every character. That I create just seems like a lot. No, not for every character. For sure it would. It would just be for maybe it have to be unique, right, like they have to be. I think. I think, maybe in my head I would reserve your player characters, like you're the class is available to pick players to like adventures in your game world, and I think that that distinction probably sets the right boundaries for where it's just like not everybody's going to be an adventure and you're not really going to be facing off full against a lot of other adventures in this campaign, unless you know, you have like a massive open world sort of evp atic running or whatever. But I think, like I love the battle Royale style things. We ran those a couple of times. I think those are always fun because it gives your part. I think it's a good like stress really for your party to write, because there is a part of the game where your rogue does want to go toetotoe with the barbarian right, and those are moments you can kind of like release that. But I think it's separate from the regular campaign. Yeah, for sure it is. It is interesting. I haven't used a player character and pc yet either. I think I think my brother has done it in a campaign before and he said he's just it didn't work out either because, like the character was too powerful and it just didn't make sense for his character to be so much more powerful than the others. And it just it. It kind of like means that there's another player on the field and that, if they're not evil, then that means you've essentially got another adventure in your group. So it can kind of just it just kind of adds on to the amount of time that you have to spend in combat and that kind of thing. So we kind of be kind of a cool like it was like Animas, shadow battles. We have to fight your dark self or whatever. Yeah, that'd be cool. We really put everybody on the level playing field. If, all of a sudden, I mean what a long combat encounter this would be. Mind you, you're pretty had to face off against itself. Yeah, depending on the level of characters. Yeah, the wizard just kills everybody anyways. Exactly dealing with this shit, but like that's that's the other consideration, right, like, if you're using evil characters like that, they're going to use them. They're gonna go for an assassinate on the weakest character and yeah, probably kill them right away. Pretty savage level gameplay. It talks about giving them challenge ratings here too. So it goes into equipment first. It talks about how you don't need an exhaustive list of equipment just just to use, like weapons in armor, plus any treasure that they mightn't be carrying, such as magic items and such. You can throw in essentially whatever you want. They're usually you can say, oh, I got this as an Airloom if it's too powerful for whatever level they are. So it's not a it's not a big deal that way. And then for chat. The challenge writing is interesting, though, because how you it's it's interesting that you can create a challenge rating for a player character. That that seems weird to me. So it talks about our and just be their level. No, well, that, well, that's the thing. It says. An NPC built for combat needs a challenge rating. Use The rules in chapter nine to determine the NPC's challenge rating, just as you would for a monster you designed. So I don't know what the rules are exactly. I've never looked into that, I guess, but maybe it has to do with the amount of hit points you have and maybe depending on whether you're spellcast or not. I don't know. I don't know what the rules are, but maybe they're. Get had to chapter nine. Yeah, yeah, then we'll figure it out. I've used that a couple times for modules that we've created just to come up with challenge ratings for things that the players have to fight in those. Okay, how would it work for a player character? It's IT's decently. Well, for a player character, you mean, like for a humanoid NPC, essentially, I I guess. But it's a character using when count class and levels from the players Hamvas, you'll see it gets weird. But yeah, okay, see when we gether sure. All right. So NPC Party memories. So NPCs might join the adventuring party because they want to a share of the lute or are willing to accept an equal share of the risk, or they might...

...follow the adventures because of some bond or loyalty, such as gratitude or love or whatever. Such mpcs are controlled by you, or you can transfer control to the players. So even if a player controls an NPC, it's up to you to make sure that the MPC is portrayed as a character in his or her own right, not just as a servant that the players can manipulate to their own benefit. Yeah, what do you mean? Players will always try to get the MPC to yes, touch the thing, pull the leaver, yes, walk across that Rickety Bridge. Yeah, for sure. Any MPC that accompanies the adventures acts as a party member and earns the full share of the experience points, which doesn't matter if you're using milestones. But yeah, that would suck to a certain extent if you're using experience points. I mean it's just experience points are just so limiting. Yeah, I think. Yeah, we all agree. I don't know the stuff this. Yeah, so when, when determining the difficulty of combat encounter, obviously make sure to include all NPC party members. So talks about low level followers here. So your campaign might allow player characters to take on lower level NPC's as followers. So this is interesting to me. So, for example, a Paladin, it might have a first level Paladin as a squire, or a wizard might accept a second level wizard as an apprentice. A cleric might choose or be assigned a third level cleric as an accolyte or bard might take on fourth level barred as an understudy kind of thing. So one advantage of allowing lower level characters to join the party is that players have backup characters if their main characters take some time off or retire or die with the disadvantage, obviously, is that you and your players have more party members to account for. So on top of that, since lower level Party members receive they receive an equal amount of XP. They will gain levels more quickly than the adventures and they might eventually catch up to them. And but also the main thing is that your players will have to protect these lower level NPC's because if you go into a full adventure, regular adventure your you might end up in a place where the monster can one shot them. So you're going to need extra healing and extra vivcation stuff. So it's just it's a it's it's questionable. It is cool, a cool thing. Like if you're already level let's say sixteen or something like that, maybe your character is at that point where he's like, I got to pass on my knowledge, right, you should start thinking about taking on that kind of apprentice type person. It's an interesting concept. I'm not sure how I guess mechanically speaking, I'm not sure how how easy it would be to do that. What do you guys think? I mean, that already sounds like a lot. The way I guess that I think of ABC's literally just like one of my players need who would be interesting to throw it at the time. Is this an important player or important character? And I go from there, like that's a lot more than I put into consideration from empathies. Maybe that speaks to like the way I play NPCs, though, like I have said that, like my obcs tend to be more like guides for the party than like, yeah, members of a living world per se, like right the way. The way I see it, though, like it could be like I could have players like, if they are high enough level, I might say, Hey, guys, create some more characters. Maybe it's a lower level one that you could take on as like an apprentice. Would you? Would you ever do that in your campaign? It's a neat idea. It so it's a bookkeeping issue, though. Eventually, eventually, it's just going to be like how much do I need to keep track of? And is your like if my players willing to take care? You know what, I would say it like if my player is willing to take care of something like that, like track the the MPC's that's then sure, kind of like how Trinket, like how Laura pretty much managed trinket right, right in critical role. If anybody hasn't watched that, and be surprised if you're haven't. But yeah, like I would say that I would leave it on the player to sort of manage that. I like, obviously I would help as a DM, but it's just extra things, right, like if a player is going to want to add an MPC just to have extra power, but then you're not really like if you're already not being ready with your character sheet four turns and stuff like, hard time saying that this is going...

...to be like a good use of time for anybody. Yeah, I can't help but like think that these that they would essentially become pack mules. If you were a high enough level, if you were like level, you know, seventeen, and you're taking on a level one character, it's like hey, carry all of our stuff for us. Make sure you've got healing potions on you, because, you know, if we go down, you got to run up there and you got to give us a healing potion and that's your job. Yeah, I'm squires second note. Yeah, otherwise stay out of our way. It kind of thing. Yeah, because because I think that's what it would come down to. But it would be kind of cool to have that, like, I don't know, maybe it could be cool to have that that MPC there as a or PC. I guess almost. It's almost a PC at that point as just like a an apprentice. I don't know, at the cool thoughts that, don't know how much I would actually implement it at the point where they're that much of a level disparity. It's just becoming everybody's favorite video game level, the ESCOL. Yes, everywhere you go for the rest of the campaign, just constantly trying to keep this level to wizard aspiring. Yeah, guy out of harm's way as you're fighting dragons. Now, I mean with with experience points, or if you're using experience points, that's where it might come in handy, because, you know, level seventeen going on fighting a dragon. You know, the party defeats the Dragon and now this level one character is boosted up to like level five seat, but because they've gained but then you have to use experience points. Yeah, exactly right. It's a flying system and I don't like it. Yeah, all right. How much time do we go? Like, think we're get fifteen minutes. Got It. Okay. So, Braden, why don't you take it away from me stop me from talking? All right, so let's do so. Let's do some talk of the town. That segment when we ask you a question and then we look at your answers to the question. Then we look at our answers to the question that we discussed. Are The answers question the question? Need to work on that. I'm tired. The question is, I'm also trying to get through this quickly. The question is, when is a time in your campaign that you had a very strange request from either of your player or another player at the table that you've been at, something that caught you like way off guard and made you go like why would you do that? And also, how does that work in the game? I mean literally every interaction with Newt in the tumbnilation campaign has been like that. You're welcome. That wasn't a compliment. Oh, literally, everything is poison, nothing is safe, and new chooses to put everything in his mouth. Yes, well, no, it's the inconsistency that gets me for nut because it was like he's terrified of everything, which is fine, and then we walk in and there's like no, in the middle of an ancient dungeon, there's just a meal there, and he was like yeah, I'm sure that's safe, I'm just going to start eating that judging. The thing is that that the big is is that my original character was someone who just went in and, you know, tested everything because he's way too curious and would just try things for no reason and he thinks it's fine. And then he got possessed by an ancient being that is super careful and super terrified of everything, and so that kind of also took over a piece of me. So my character is, you know, struggling between that, like you know, my my normal characters just try things and the other part of me says run away. So when in that situation, Leone had already tried the food and he was fine, so my natural, you know normal newt said, yeah, I gotta go for it now too. So I don't know, I'm trying it. It's hard, it's weird. So yeah, I got it, though it's super inconsistent and very, very weird was what's yours, Stordan? If that was Carlos is, I don't know. I guess I've had a player he was looking for things, I guess, in the shop and he's like, you know what kind of what kind of things are in this general store? It's like a backwater place, and so I threw out random objects and things like that and I let there was like a carved duck and he decided that that was the most amazing thing ever, and so he's picked up the is carved duck and now every time he goes into a place he's like, are there any more carved animals that I can find?...

And so, you know, it's kind of like this quirk, but it's not really that strange. I don't know. I guess I haven't run into enough situations yet that I question why someone is doing something, at least in my current campaign, or things that I can think of off the top of my head. So but yeah, it's fun. It's fun I like. I like that randomness to it. I've got to what the people say. I've got to that are kind of tied. The first one is when one of the my homebrew players tried to tame the lochness monster. Yeah, yes, because they were fighting. They're fighting dinosaurs and it was like a fight and they were clearly like teamed by these creatures that they were fighting and they're doing their best to survive and he was just like taken his turns to like try and talk when down so that he could have a pet dinosaur, as these things were like aggressively trying to destroy the boat that they were on. It didn't go so well. The other one is that. Okay, so we all have like players that like they get really stuck in a routine and you really just kind of hope that they like it's like every single turn. It's like I do this, all right, that's my turn, and it's the same action every turn and you kind of hope that, like, you know, they they actively look for other situations than like other things that they could do to try something a little bit different and shake it up. I have, are you crazy? I have a player that is the exact opposite and does nothing but the most random out there. This is an unlimited game and choices whatever I want it to be by action. So yeah, I was running. He's I can't think of a time where he's made an attack in combat, ever, because he's constantly trying to do something else instead. That's impressive, but difficult, bizarre. No, myve like, I I'm stuck with what to do with that one, because, like, I like that he's actually trying to get out right, yeah, to do the most with like this. This is unconventional and maybe it'll work. But also, guy he is. He is like detrimental to the team and they're the other players are starting to get super frustrated. We were running, we were running kringles wondrous workshop, available now from the real city of society. One of the tests that we were running for that. I was running with this group and they're all they're all like very new players and they've been really excited to get into DD and I've been really excited to like show them all about DD. And it got to the final boss fight and everybody started launching arrows and one of them launching spells at this this construct version of Santa that they were fighting, and he's just like that. You said there's gifts in the corner. I was like yeah, he's like I'm just going to take my term, I'm going to run over and just start like rage, like unwrapping all of these as fast as I can to see what's inside of them. I was like, okay, your party's gonna die, and he's like a he's a rogue dude, like he's the damage dealer. So yeah, that was that. But let's look at what the society said on twitter. At Brew, Brew Bomb, at Brew Bom. Okay, yeah, this was them. His lawful, neutral, skink, rogue assassin obsessed with getting stabby points right as the group is about to execute their well thought out plan. Rowe said. So. Anyways, I leap up onto this stalactite and leap onto the leaders back to perform a backstab and he died. That's that. To me, is like borderline, like chaotic stupid, like now, border light. That's chaotic stupid, like that's that's not it's definitely one of those like I no longer care about this character, mom. Well, that's not yes, outside the box thinking. That's Oh, my player like especially. It's like like he pointed out that his players took some time to like come up with a well formulated plan and that as they were going to execute it, like he just went in did this thing. Why? I don't know. I don't get it is Yolo, that's Yodo, that's you only die once and it's right. Now we have a couple over on our discord from User Matt. Perhaps not the stranges, but certainly left me scratching my head in wonder at a player refused to do anything other than roll stats for their characters, despite the campaign using point by. After losing their first PC after...

...only a few sessions, that's a story in and of itself, they asked me to roll the stats for their new PC. I rolled terribly and offered to bump up some of the stats, as it was now well below the minimum range I had set ability scores for my game. They refused. Created a rogue Paladin with their best stats being thirteen, a plus one. He was surprised Pikachu face when they later got upset when they couldn't hit anything at level eight with a plus four as a melee character. Ha Ha, ha ha. Yeah, that reminds me on we're doing the avalon campaign, the short lived avalon campaign, that good one. I want to get back to that. The Bard that I honestly had some pretty good ideas for the game world and it's it'll all make come don't worry. But the the bard that one of the papers is the players made it. have like eight HP a level one. I'm like, all right, but he knew what he was doing too. Is One of the more experienced players. But hope so. Fine. Yep, my Mike, my character in Braden's campaign, has a negative one constitution modifier. That's just the shame. Enough got it was an in this campaign that Matt's talking about. I have I have ten AC. Yeah, we all were, we all make we all make bad decisions, but like I and Jordan to like we both made these conscious decisions, but we're not like shocked when bad thing. No, and it's like wait, what do you mean? You give me? I have ten AC. No, yeah, we're so what do you mean? I'm down? I only have twenty eighth P at level nine. Yeah, what do you mean? The one attack completely wipes me out of the fight? Yeah, it's the it's the shock. Is supers. Yeah, it's the shocked thing that. Guess me, it's like the it's the confusion as to why you can't do anything, because because you handicapped yourself. Yeah, supply. And then finally we have from User Blue Basil had a campaign where the players thought that they had found some flaws in the economy and asked that they could create a monopoly on Ale in the region, with plans to rack in thousands of gold well at Super Low levels about three they came up at this because part of the campaign they had rated a large brewery and storehouse in a remote area of being run by thugs. This is this is the best comment. Luckily for me, I was pretty confident that a free market would compensate for any of the scams they were planning to run, but they went pretty in depth into calculations on profits and margins. The free market comment got me. That's funny, but can you imagine like sitting there listening as your players like sit down and detail a plan to just derail the entire gold economy in your game? Yeah, yes, actually, I've been talking about world and stability of the coin in your game world's Britain. There's really want to talk about this, by the and yeah, I've played in a couple campaigns with Lou beazel before and his friends always come up with the most interesting conversations as to like how they can come up with the most like outside the box physics kind of discussions on how to do something in the campaign. It's like comes down the amount of calculations that are done, like based on the volume of a fireball and things like that. It comes up more often than you would think. Yeah, it's it's really funny. I have I mean you know that one of our players in our campaign, he has a staff of staff that allows them to redirect flow of water and niece constantly asking. He's like, well, you know, x thing is like ten percent water. What if I just said? What if I he's trying to recently on a dragon's as blood beender baby and recently like a dragon's acid breath. He's like, you know, acid is like whatever. Percent Water, like not this ascid. It's not. Yeah, magical acid bitch takes the DSIXA. You're six D six damage. Yeah, physics and chemistry guys coming into magic. It's in basic man, are two different face. Thank you. Anyways, that brought me back. That does it for this week's episode of triple of each. If you want to be in our next episode, involved in the discussion, go over to our social media pages. That is, real city society on Instagram, royal city social on twitter. The links to our community discord can be found in both. Please join. We've been having some great times over the recently and besides that, keep it locked for a new episode of triple advantage next week.

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